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ARKANSAS CITY TRAVELER
ROLL FROM APRIL 23, 1879, THROUGH DECEMBER 27, 1882.
[Starting April 23, 1879.]
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 23, 1879.

NATHAN HUGHES, PUBLISHER.

[AD: O. P. HOUGHTON.]

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, April 23, 1879

GENERAL DRY GOODS,
OLDEST AND CHEAPEST "CASH HOUSE" IN THE VALLEY,
Stock always complete and prices low. Call and see us.
O. P. HOUGHTON
(Successor to Houghton & McLaughlin.)
New Brick Corner,
ARKANSAS CITY, KANSAS.
BOOTS AND SHOES,
HATS, CAPS & FURNISHING GOODS
CARPETS, CLOTHING, NOTIONS.
[EDITORIAL PAGE: THE UPPER ARKANSAS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, April 23, 1879

THE UPPER ARKANSAS.
We publish this week J. D. McKown's report of the upper Arkansas river to Maj. Charles R. Suter, Corps of Engineers, U. S. A. Also the endorsement of the latter officer and recom mendation of the work to Brig. Gen. A. A. Humphreys, Chief of Engineers, U. S. A. The same was forwarded to Hon. M. R. Leonard, by our Congressional delegation, and left with the TRAVELER for publication. Senator Plumb writes a very interesting letter on this subject, and will spare no pains in securing the necessary appropriations for this purpose.

REPORT OF MR. J. D. McKOWN, ASSISTANT ENGINEER,
U. S. ENGINEER OFFICE,
St. Louis, Mo., January 27, 1879.
Major: I herewith respectfully submit the following report of the examination of the Arkansas River from the mouth of the Little Arkansas River to Fort Smith.

In accordance with orders received from this office, I proceeded to Wichita, Kansas, and commenced the examination of the river at the mouth of the Little Arkansas.

The latter stream empties into the main river a short distance above Wichita, part of the water is diverted from the natural channel to supply a mill, but again comes into the main river some two and a half miles below the city. The Arkansas River is very tortuous in its course, that portion from Wichita to Arkansas City passing through a prairie country, and has very little timber on the banks, a thin growth of cottonwood and willow prevailing.

The bed of the stream is very wide for the amount of water running, and is of a light sandy nature, quicksand prevailing in a large degree. In many places where the current is strong, there is a thin layer of gravel over the sand, which once broken through, shows the soft sand underneath.

As we go down the river rock becomes somewhat frequent, rock ridges often crossing the stream, sometimes almost amounting to rapids, and leaving but little room for passage of boats at low water.

I had the advantage of seeing the river at a very low stage of water and in its worst condition. At no time during the examination was there a rise of more than six inches, and that lasted but a few days.

Miles.

From Wichita to Arkansas City 65

From Arkansas City to the State line 14

From State line to Grand River 236

From Grand River to Ft. Smith 94

TOTAL: 409 Miles

The small amount of money available rendered rapid work necessary, and hurried reconnaissance was all that could be made. On such information as I could obtain, I respectfully submit the following approximate estimate of the cost of improving the river for steamboat navigation at low-water.

The Little Arkansas River empties into the Arkansas about three quarters of a mile above the bridge at Wichita. The bed of the main stream is from 600 to 800 feet wide from there to the bridge. The slope of the river from the mouth of the Little Arkansas to a point 1 mile below is 8.03 feet; high water mark at Wichita from the best information obtainable is 7.45 feet above low water, but as the landing would probably be below it, it need not be taken into consideration.

From Wichita to El Paso, a distance of some 15 miles, the slope of the river is about 3 feet per mile, or 45 feet for the whole distance. The bed of the river is generally wide, and to within 2 miles of El Paso needs a continued series of dikes and dams to contract it to a proper width, which would be about 150 feet. This would take a dike of 600 feet every half mile for 13 miles, or 7,800 feet in all. About 2 miles above El Paso the river narrows down to about the required width, with not less than 3 feet of water in the channel. This extends for nearly 2 miles.

About one-half mile above El Paso there is a rocky reef extending across the river, running out from the left, where there is a rocky bank. The expense would be but slight to place it in good boating order: $2,500 would be sufficient.

From El Paso to Oxford the distance is 25 miles. The difference of level between the two places is about 69 feet, giving a slope of 2.75 feet per mile. This piece of river is a continual series of comparatively short bends, and the water being forced on the convex side of them, forms a good channel in most places. It will require about 78,000 feet of dam for this distance, or 312 feet per mile.

About one and one-fourth miles above Oxford there is a brush and rock dam which is built for the purpose of throwing in a race or ditch, where it is used for mill power. The dam is a slight, irregular built affair, angling down stream.

The difference of the level of the water above and below it at the left bank is 1.37 feet. The right bank here is about 40 feet high and of talcose slate.

At Oxford there is a pontoon bridge. A roadway built to it is made of rock, brush, and prairie hay, the latter predominating, and seems to make an excellent dike, closing the river in to about 150 feet, and making a good channel along the bluff for about a half mile.

Some 4 miles above Oxford the Ne-Ne Scah Creek empties into the river, adding something to the volume of water.

Brush for mattresses is quite scarce on the river from Wichita to this place; but there is but little doubt that the tall, rank prairie grass, which is indigenous to this region, and grows in great abundance, could be used to advantage in the work by mixing it in with the brush, and in all probability would be economical.

About three-fourths of a mile below Oxford the river widens out and is full of bars. At five miles from Oxford, the banks on the right are high and contain considerable loose slate. The river bottom is of rock, but there is a fair depth of water: from 2-1/2 to 6 feet. About fourteen miles above Arkansas City, the banks on the left are about 30 feet high, of sand and clay, underlaid with loose rock.

The slope of the river from Oxford to Arkansas City, a distance of 25 miles, is 65 feet, or 2.6 feet per mile. There will be necessary for this piece of river about 16,500 feet of dike and dam: 660 feet per mile. The approximate amount of water in the river at Arkansas City is 575 cubic feet per second. At this place there is a wagon-bridge about 600 in length, with the lower chord 20 feet above low-water. A draw would be necessary to allow the passage of boats. In the present state it is an obstruction to navigation.

From Arkansas City to Kaw Agency, the distance is 44 miles. The fall of the river between these points is 110 feet, or 2.5 feet per mile.

It will take about 16,500 feet of work to improve this part of the river, or 375 feet per mile.

The river banks are becoming better timbered, and the river improving. Walnut river empties about six miles below Arkansas City and adds a fair amount to the volume of water in the river.

Below the Walnut the river changes somewhat in character. The banks and bluffs are higher and more rocky, the bed of the river more narrow, and timber more plentiful. Oak, hickory, pecan, walnut, blackberry, and many other varieties are common. Cottonwood, of course, is always to be found on the banks and low grounds. Below and near the State line, and a few miles farther down, about the mouth of Chaloca Creek, a quantity of loose rock, apparently piled up during freshets, shows itself in the river. Some of this rock should be removed and a dam thrown in to concentrate the water. About $3,000 would do it.

On this piece of river, from Kaw Agency to Salt Creek, the distance is 62 miles. The slope of the river is 136 feet, or about 2.3 feet per mile. It will take about 28,000 feet of dam to improve it, or 451 feet per mile. On this part of the river snags are becoming more plentiful. Between Kaw Agency and Salt Creek the Salt Fork empties; it throws in considerable water.

From Salt Creek to Black Bear Creek, a distance of 15 miles, the river is wide and bad, and will take about 14,000 feet of dam to improve it, or 933 feet per mile. The slope is about 2.2 feet per mile, or 33 feet for the distance of 15 miles. Black Bear Creek comes in on the right, and adds something to the amount of water in the river, even when very low.

From Black Bear Creek to Cimarron River, the distance is 62 miles. The bed of the river is very wide and sandy, sometimes getting as wide as 2,000 feet. It will take some 20,500 feet of dam to improve this part of the river, or 500 feet per mile. The slope of the river is about 1.8 feet per mile, or 112 feet for the distance of 62 miles.

The Cimarron or Red Fork of the Arkansas comes in on the right, and contributes a considerable amount of water to the main river. Its deep red tinge is in strong contrast with the muddy water of the Arkansas, and the waters running side by side some distance before mingling have a marked and unique appearance.

From the Cimarron to the mouth of Grand River the distance is 87 miles. The slope of the river in this distance is about 152 feet, or 1.75 per mile. It will take about 38,000 feet of dam to improve this portion of the river, or 437 feet per mile.

About 3 miles above the mouth of Grand River is the bridge of the Missouri, Kansas and Texas Railroad. The length is 800 feet; there are four spans of 200 feet each, and the lower chord is 34 above low-water. The bridge is a strong and handsome structure, built of wood and iron. It has no draw, and may be considered an obstruction.

About one-fourth of a mile above, the mouth of the Verdigris empties and makes quite an addition to the volume of water. The Grand River discharges still more than the Verdigris, and together they make a very perceptible difference in the main stream.

Below the mouth of the Grand, the river changes very much in its character. The bed of the river is not so wide, the channel much better, and the bars and banks contain more gravel.

From the mouth of Grand River to Greenleaf's Creek, about 28 miles, generally good; 5,000 feet of dam will suffice for this distance, but it is almost impassable in places on account of snags, which in some locations almost fill the water-way.

At Greenleaf's Creek the river was closed with ice, and the examination had to be abandoned. But as Mr. Albert had made a survey of that part of the river in 1869, his report will give information concerning it. The distance from Grand River to Fort Smith is 94 miles, and I should think that $150,000 would be sufficient as most all of the work would be in shallow water.

SUMMARY.
Locality. Distance, miles.

Wichita to El Paso: 15

El Paso to Oxford: 25

Oxford to Arkansas City: 25

Arkansas City to Kaw Agency: 44

Kaw Agency to Salt Creek: 62.5

Salt Creek to Black Bear Creek: 15

Black Bear Creek to Cimarron River: 41.5

Cimarron River to Grand River: 87

Grand River to Fort Smith: 94

Total: 409 miles.

Locality.

Wichita to El Paso: 7,200 Linear feet of dam.

El Paso to Oxford: 7,800

Oxford to Arkansas City: 17,000

Arkansas City to Kaw Agency: 16,500

Kaw Agency to Salt Creek: 28,000

Salt Creek to Black Bear Creek: 14,000

Black Bear Creek to Cimarron River: 20,500

Cimarron River to Grand River: 38,000

Grand River to Fort Smith: _______

Total: 149,000 linear feet of dam.

Locality.

El Paso to Oxford: $3,000 Cost of rock excavation.

Arkansas City to Kaw Agency: $3,000 Cost of rock excavation.

Total: $6,000 Cost of rock excavation.

Locality. Cost.

Wichita to El Paso: $32,400

El Paso to Oxford: $38,600

Oxford to Arkansas City: $76,500

Arkansas City to Kaw Agency: $77,250

Kaw Agency to Salt Creek: $126,000

Salt Creek to Black Bear Creek: $63,000

Black Bear Creek to Cimarron River: $92,250

Cimarron River to Grand River: $174,000

Grand River to Fort Smith: $150,000

Total: $826,500

Add for contingencies and Engineer expenses: $73,500

GRAND TOTAL: $900,000

The Arkansas River passes through the Indian Territory, from the southern boundary line of the State of Kansas, to Fort Smith, Arkansas, a distance of about 330 miles by river. Little trade could be expected from the Territory except in the Cherokee Nation, between Fort Smith and the Grand River, where perhaps some business might be done.

That portion of the country tributary to the river in Kansas, from Wichita to the State line, is rich, fertile, and well cultivated, and would derive great benefit from the opening of the river to navigation. Very Respectfully, J. D. McKOWN, Assistant Engineer.

Maj. CHAS. R. SUTTER, Corps of Engineers, U. S. A.

In accordance with your instructions of July 8th, 1878, I have caused a reconnaissance to be made by Mr. J. D. McKown, assistant engineer, of the Arkansas River from the mouth of Little Arkansas to Fort Smith, and a copy of his report thereon is herewith submitted.

Except in the upper portion before mentioned, the navigable low-water depth is about the same as that of the Arkansas River between Little Rock and Fort Smith, and it would of course be useless to attempt to get a greater depth until the balance of the stream was correspondingly improved.

The estimates presented by Assistant McKown are for removing snags and rocks and so contracting the width of the stream as to give at low-water a depth of about 2 feet, but this estimate is only a rough approximation at the best, and no work on this scale should be undertaken, even if deemed advisable, until a thorough survey of the stream has been made, the cost of which is estimated at $16,360.

I am, however, of the opinion that by removing the snags and constructing slight dams at some of the worst shoals the navigation would be so much improved as to render it as good as that between Little Rock and Fort Smith, and this would seem to be all that is worth doing until the general improvement of the river is undertaken. The cost of this work would be about $100,000, which could be expended in one season.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

CHAS. R. SUTTER, Maj. of Engineers.
Brig. Gen. A. A. HUMPHREYS, Chief of Engineers, U. S. A.

[FROM WINFIELD CORRESPONDENT.]

Arkansas City Traveler, April 23, 1879

It seems so singular that any intelligent clod-hopper should even question the advisability of voting more bonds. We have now only $144,000 of railroad bonds, $50,000 County bonds, eighty school districts with bonded indebtedness, ranging from $500 to $10,000, and bridge bonds enough to impoverish Jay Gould. The pulpit took up the howl two years since and screeched itself hoarse preaching to ignorant farmers the God given truth, that bonded indebtedness was the true way to eternal glory. Every town lot man, banker, lawyer, and doctor took the mania, and carried the "North and South" road. Then all went lovely until one fine morning they found the Emporia road in jail; electioneering money gone, and the under lip of howling, blatant Priest and Levite hung six inches below their chin.

Something must be done, town lots down, and many will have to go to work unless some other bait can be thrown out to catch gudgeons. "Lord help me and my wife, my son John and his wife, us four and no more," was offered up before toast at many a table. Their prayer was answered by the Santa Fe. A shout went up, "Why had we not thought of it before! I always knew that would be the first road into Cowley."

The Atchison sent its agents into every corner of Cowley, for the old screechers were about played out. The fresh actors succeeded in proving beyond a doubt that to give $144,000, and pay seven percent, was a genuine speculation, as the taxes would pay principal and interest in twenty years. Figures won't lie. And the Mayor of Topeka came to Cowley as an opponent of bonds; but would be just a little pleased if we would only vote these, as it would make Topeka, and in the course of his three hours harangue, convinced everyone that if the road was built, the trade of Cowley would go down the river, and the poor innocent soulsgood sturdy farmersrushed to the polls and by a rousing majority gave the Atchison road $144,000. Now we have her sure, "Hurrah for the engine." But stop a moment, friend: "A rose by any other name smells just as sweet."

The Legislature meets, and one member from this county had the manliness and independence (All honor to E. C. Manning) to offer a bill, the effect of which was that a farmer could retain his sacks after giving the road his wheat. "That bill must be killed or we will not build the road," says the General Manager and President of the Atchison road. Delegation after delegation left Winfield and Arkansas City to kill the bill, and to the eternal disgrace of every member who voted against it, be it said they succeeded.

Nothing more was said of the road, or thought of it, until up comes another proposition to give some other road anywhere from $65,000 to $150,000. Now the engineers begin to work, or at least one man with a wheel barrow, is running a line into Sumner, then he will shoot back to Winfield, thence, if he lives long enough, south to the State linecrossing the Arkansas river three times in going fifty-five miles.

In all seriousness, fellow farmers, can you afford to be thus taken in many times more! Can you afford to give of your hard-earned taxes to corporations that can "bulldoze" your Legislature for or against any legislation that may be for your interest?

Are you willing that a few men shall be enriched at the expense of your families?

Are you willing longer to be made the butt of ridicule, and branded as a set of apes that can be cajoled into voting anything that some codfish-smelling Yankee may suggest?

MORE ANON,
*****
[PERSONALS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, April 23, 1879

King Berry is up from the Pawnee Agency.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 23, 1879

C. R. Mitchell returned from Topeka last Friday.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 23, 1879

Patterson sold his fine driving horse to a party in Winfield for $140.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 23, 1879

Laf. McLaughlin is building a room between Matlack's and Channell & McLaughlin's office.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 23, 1879

Eight teams from Benton County, Arkansas, camped on the Walnut last Sunday on their way to Arizona.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 23, 1879

Prof. Eph. Mowry with his jig dances and vocal sweetness entertained the audience at the Literary last Friday night.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 23, 1879

We again call the attention of the dads to that horrid goose pond at the northwest corner of the old City Hotel. Fill it up. It adds nothing to the beauty of Summit Street.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 23, 1879

Died. The sudden death of Mr. Benjamin Haywood, of Topeka, on the night of the 18th, April, is announced in the Commonwealth. The deceased was a brother of our townsman, R. C. Haywood, and was a highly respected citizen of Topeka. His remains were taken to New York for interment.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 23, 1879

The Daily Telegram says we oppose that L. L. & G. road because it is coming to Winfield, and that we would tear our shirt if it was coming to Arkansas City. Quite a mistake, my boy. We would not give a cent for a garment in that condition. We are not at all envious of Winfield, and are proud that she is in Cowley County, though we can see no reason why the people who reside outside the corporation should not enjoy a breath of air. Our motto is "Live and let live," and we think there is plenty of room in Cowley for both towns, even were they much larger. We have no desire to do injustice to others, and our imagination is not morbid while we see in the future both towns growing into one, with a Grand Central Depot in Posy Valley, and ships from all nations rolling the waters of the noble Arkansas!!!!

Arkansas City Traveler, April 23, 1879.

PAWNEE AGENCY, INDIAN TERRITORY, April 14th, 1879.
Ed. TRAVELER:

The Steamer Dardanelle landed at this place today on her first trip up the Arkansas. She is a small boat, built especially for the upper Arkansas trade: draws eight inches of water empty. The steamer belongs to Cotton Bros. & Co., Dardanelle, Arkansas, who are engaged in running a large flouring mill at that place. One of the firm is Captain on the boat, and means to load her down with wheat to supply his mill. Yours truly, T. E. BERRY.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 23, 1879.

An assault was made upon Mr. Hiatt, Superintendent of the boarding school at Pawnee Agency, on Sunday 14th inst., by R. S. Ball, a former employee. Mr. Ball had been discharged from the service and ordered off the reservation for ungentlemanly conduct by the Commissioner of Indian Affairs. Mr. Ball believed that Mr. Hiatt had been instrumental in effecting his dismissal, which belief led to the assault above mentioned. Having accomplished his purpose, Mr. Ball fled, and expressed himself as ready to die in preference to being arrested. Indian Police were put upon his track, but failed to overtake him. Agency people believe that Mr. Hiatt would have been murdered had he offered any resistance, his assailant being well armed.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 23, 1879

On Thursday last, we made a visit to Salt City; and in company with Mr. Wm. Berkey, went down to the renowned springs just north of the town, and there saw one of the grandest fountains of mineral water that exists on this continent. Within a small space, covering less than fifty square yards of surface, flow four strong veins of water such as sulphur, magnesia, iron, and salt. These springs have been brought into notice within the last year, and we predict that within a short period their reputation for health giving qualities will be renowned throughout the west. In conversation the other day with one of the Santa Fe R. R. officials, we were told that these springs, if properly advertised and improved, together with good accommodations for the public, would become of more value than anything of the same character in Colorado. About three hundred yards from the springs, across the county line, salt is now manufactured and a large volume of very strong saline water runs to waste. Near the latter place, springs of a high temperature exist, too hot for human endurance. We are informed that persons who have suffered with skin diseases have found almost immediate relief, while diseases of the kidneys, and the organs of digestion, have been restored to health in a miraculously short time. If steps are taken to improve this property, the public will have cause to rejoice while the owners will be richly remunerated for their outlay.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 23, 1879.

The Legislature passed a law of considerable importance concerning schools, of which the following is the substance.

The district board, each board of education, and each and every school district board shall require a uniform series of text books to be used in each branch of study in each school; but each board shall determine for itself, within six months from the passage of this act, the particular series of text books which shall hereafter be adopted and introduced in pursuance of the provisions of this act by said boards. No change shall be made for a period of five years from the date of the introduction of any particular series of text books, unless four- fifths of the legal voters of any district shall petition for a change in the series of text books adopted; but no member of the said boards, or either of them, nor any teacher, while employed as such teacher, shall act as agent for any author, publisher, or bookseller, nor shall any member of the said boards, or any of them, or any employed teacher, directly or indirectly, receive any gift, emolument, or reward for his or her influence in recommending or introducing any book, school apparatus, or furniture of any kind whatever.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 23, 1879

The improvements at the Central Avenue Hotel are being pushed forward, and the rooms that have been overhauled now have the appearance of solid comfort, while the bedding is as clean as virgin snow. Ye traveling men, give the Central Avenue a call, and you will have no reason to longer snub the accommodations to be found in our city.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 23, 1879.

Re-Opening service at the M. E. Church next Sabbath morning at 10-1/2 o'clock. And re-organization of the Sabbath School at 3 o'clock p.m. All are cordially invited.

L. F. LAVERTY, Pastor.
Arkansas City Traveler, April 23, 1879.

The Indian scare can't make a scare, and those who started the thing find lean picking and are trying to make the impression that we stole the dirty old rooster. When we take things, my boy, we want those that don't stink, and that we can handle without pinching with a pair of tongs.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 23, 1879.

There will be preaching next Sabbath afternoon (April 27th) at three o'clock in the Stony Point Schoolhouse. After which if the way is clear, a Union Sunday School will be organized.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 23, 1879.

Remember the Ice Cream Social at Dr. Griffith's next Friday evening, April 25th. All are cordially invited as a good time is anticipated.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 23, 1879.

STRAYED. One Bay Filly, 3 years old, about 14 hands high with color marks. A reward will be given for the return of the same to JOHN HARMON.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 23, 1879.

The man who carried off my umbrella from the Presbyterian Church a week ago last Sunday evening will please return it. D. BERGER.

[KANSAS NEWS - FRONT PAGE.]

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, April 30, 1879

A new locomotive for the A. T. & S. F. road has just been completed at the Baldwin locomotive works. It is called "Uncle Dick," and weighs 65 tons and is said to be the largest locomotive in the world.

[INDIANS: SITTING BULL AN ALIEN.]

Arkansas City Traveler, April 30, 1879

SITTING BULL AN ALIEN.
The secretary of war has issued instructions to Gen. Sherman to capture Sitting Bull in case he crosses the frontier, and to hold him as a prisoner of war. Sitting Bull and his band have voluntarily subjected themselves to the authority of Great Britain and ceased to be subjects of the United States. They will not now, even with peaceable intention, be permitted to re-cross the frontier.

[EDITORIAL PAGE.]

Arkansas City Traveler, April 30, 1879

Several articles have appeared of late, in the public press, tending to encourage squatter sovereignty in the Indian Territory. A letter from Cornelius Boudinot (who generally flies off at half cock) is also published for the purpose of creating a false impression in the public mind. The act of Congress, establishing the metes and bounds of the Indian Territory, has never been repealed, and is yet the law of the land. That act prescribes that the Territory is set aside for the sole and exclusive use and benefit of Indian tribes, and expressly prohibits the settlement therein of any other race. The statutes of the United States also make it penal offense for any white person not an employee of Government to locate therein without special permit from lawful authority.

Although it is a fact that some of the five nations ceded to Government large tracts of land that they formerly acquired from the same source, the original bill creating the Territory covers every acre within its limits, and the treaties thus made expressly affirm that all these lands shall be used on the part of the United States for settling Indian tribes.

If we turn to the early history of this Territory, we find that less than fifty years ago it was uninhabited by any of the five nations, and was known as the Territory of Arkansas. Indian wars, then so common on this continent, rendered it necessary on the part of the general Government to remove the five nations beyond the encroachment of civilization, and hence this territory was formed.

In the early history of the war of the rebellion, two parties arose among the Indians in the Territory, and the full bloods, or Pins, as they were designated, went into the Federal army, while the half breeds were mustered into McCullock's Southern ranks. In the battles that were fought at Pea Ridge, Flat Rock, Cane Hill, and Prairie Grove, the five nations were auxiliary forces and sent a summons of death into many a soldier.

At the close of the rebellion, the question arose whether the rights of the Rebel Indian in the Territory were not confiscated, and to settle the dispute, the treaty of 1866 was made. That treaty also recites that the Indians shall forever possess and enjoy a perfect right and title to all lands lying within the limits of said Territory.

The ceded lands of twelve or fourteen million acres that squatter sovereignty proposes to cover with her broad wings, cannot be taken for colonization while the Government recognizes the old treaties.

In 1874 Congress passed a law that no more treaties shall be made with any Indian tribe, but left passed treaties undisturbed.

The Forty-fifth Congress passed a law that it shall be unlawful for the Interior Department to remove into the Indian Territory any tribe of Indians from New Mexico or Arizona, the Sioux included. But during all this time it has created no right for white men.

About the time of the first settlement of this reserve, some three thousand people went down onto the "Outlet," and made settlements. They remained undisturbed a few months only, when Government resolved to put them out, and destroyed all improve ments.

With this experience, it looks to us that it is a game of hazard that no wise man will play to settle on lands that can only be held by force, and where the incentive to mob and riot so plainly exists.

Whether the policy of the General Government towards the Indian is wholly right or all wrong has been argued by learned men from opposite standpoints, and the question remains unsettled. That the Indian can be taught, and has mind to comprehend a superior condition far above his crude nature, is no longer a question for argument. But whether his advancement in the next decade will meet the requirements to enable him to cope with white settlements that are pressing him on every side admits of serious doubts. The commerce of the "New West" is reaching out, and is making demands for greater room. Our railroads are asking for a right of way through the Indian lands, and seem determined to open up a new era of things. Of this we feel assured, that if the Government takes no steps this season to remove those now going on to these lands, a general rush will follow after autumn harvest that no Congress will feel disposed to drive out. We shall see.

[PERSONALS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, April 30, 1879.

George Whitney starts for Colorado next Monday.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 30, 1879.

Dr. Loomis is confined to his house with sickness.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 30, 1879.

Dr. Shepard was confined to his house with sickness several days last week.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 30, 1879.

Dr. Reed was severely ill last week, but has so far recovered as to resume practice.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 30, 1879.

The Arkansas river got its back up last week and is now on a gush. Look for boats up any day.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 30, 1879.

C. M. Scott was at the Cheyenne Agency on the 21st of April and all was quiet among the Indians.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 30, 1879.

The veranda recently added to the Central Avenue Hotel gives it a homelike pleasant appearance.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 30, 1879.

The school desks for the schoolhouse at the Ponca Agency passed through town Monday last.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 30, 1879.

Rev. Fleming writes to us that he intends to rusticate among the mountains at Nickelesville, Pennsylvania, for a season.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 30, 1879.

Capt. Walton and crew, of the Cherokee, took their departure on Thursday last for a voyage down the Arkansas.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 30, 1879.

Government freight from Wichita to Reno was let last year at $2.15, but this year at $1.52; St. Beard obtaining it at that figure.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 30, 1879.

Several emigrants passed through town last Monday intending to take claims on the lands embodied in the old Creek Survey.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 30, 1879.

The ranks of the Militia company in Bolton Township are nearly full and Capt. Huffmaster has received his commission from the Governor.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 30, 1879.

We are informed that Mr. A. A. Newman has received another flour contract of about one and a half million pounds, to be delivered in the Territory.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 30, 1879.

Denis Harkins, of Bolton Township, is the champion farmer. He plowed and planted to corn, forty-five acres of ground, in less than twenty-three days.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 30, 1879.

Mrs. Lorry, of Bolton township, left us a very nice bunch of asparagus last Thursday.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 30, 1879.

The woodwork on the Cowley County Bank building was done by E. R. Thompson, who keeps a lumber yard, and is prepared to build you a cottage or mansion.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 30, 1879.

The Surveying Corps of the Cowley Sumner & Fort Smith R. R. came into town last Friday and ran a line from the east side of the town on to the State line.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 30, 1879.

Hon. A. B. Lemmon has sold his interest in the Winfield Courier to his father-in-law, D. A. Millington, who will continue the publication of the Courier, as formerly.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 30, 1879.

Mr. Henry Tisdale, the mail contractor, gave us a call last week, and informed us of his intention to thoroughly repair the old City Hotel this summer, and rent it to a first-class landlord.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 30, 1879.

The new building opposite the TRAVELER office, designed for the Cowley County Bank, is finished, and ready for business where in another year will be seen crowds of cattlemen obtaining exchange for longhorns.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 30, 1879.

Miss Rouzee, residing in Beaver Township, is an artisan of high order, as her work at Eddy's Drug Store will fully attest. Those who wish to preserve the shadow of life on canvass, should examine this specimen, as it will stand the test of the critic's eye.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 30, 1879.

Maj. John D. Miles, Agent at the Cheyenne and Arapahoe Agency, reports that the Indians are quiet and well disposed, and at the time of the reportsome two weeks agothat the Indians were disorderly, and about to start on the war-path, they were plowing and planting corn. Nothing like an appropriation to make things lively.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 30, 1879.

James Morgan, who has resided here for several years, was attacked with hemorrhage of the lungs about a month ago and his condition is yet serious. Mr. Morgan, while in health, depended upon his daily labor for the support of his family, and now that his health is lost, he is deprived of all means of support. We hope our citizens will see to it that the comforts of life are furnished them.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 30, 1879.

DIED. In Bolton Township, April 26th, J. W. Ryan, of consumption.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 30, 1879.

A Government ferryboat will soon be placed on the Salt Fork at the Ponca Agency.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 30, 1879.

Seven teams loaded last week at Schiffbauer Bros. with supplies for the Territory.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 30, 1879.

A three mile grade north of Winfield, on the Cowley, Sumner & Ft. Smith R. R., has been let to contractors.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 30, 1879.

The young folks will celebrate May day in Grandpa Endicott's grove tomorrow afternoon.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 30, 1879.

Peter Pearson is selling furniture cheaper than any other dealer in the county.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 30, 1879.

Your attention is called to the special ad. of W. D. Mowry. Will thinks he can do better by you on the Packard Organ than you can do elsewhere.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 30, 1879.

The President has issued his proclamation warning all those going into the Indian Territory for settlement that the military forces of the U. S. will be called upon to speedily and immediately remove them therefrom.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 30, 1879.

Divine service was held in Stony Point schoolhouse last Sabbath by Rev. McClung. A large number were present. After service a Sabbath school was organized.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 30, 1879.

J. K. Stafford, who has a ranch on Chikaskia, was nearly washed away during the recent high water. The water arose in his camp in the night and he and his family were obliged to retreat to high land though losing some of his effects. He now thinks of returning with his family to this place.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 30, 1879.

On and after May 1st, mail from Wichita will arrive and depart daily. Sunday's mail will be distributed on Monday morning.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 30, 1879.

Messrs. Peters & Cooper, who have been wintering cattle on Wild Horse creek, in the Territory, have driven their stock up on Chikaskia, and have some 500 head of as fine beeves as one could wish to see. These gentlemen have been remarkably lucky, not having lost a single head during the winter, and in getting their stock in such good shape so early in the season.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 30, 1879.

Editor Traveler:

Permit a member of the "White Church" a little space for explanation to Mr. Berkey and friends of temperance.

Up to May of last year, the Trustees of the First Presbyterian Church had been often worried into granting the use of the building to tramp showmen, minstrels, and political meetings, and as is usual in such gatherings, much waste tobacco was expectorated on the floor and about the seats, and the filth of it was a grievance to many members. A year ago the Ladies Society of the Church taking the matter in hand thoroughly cleansed and beauti fied the house. It was then re-dedicated to the worship of God, and the Session of the Church and congregation agreeing to the same, resolved to hold the Church for religious worship alone. This was published in the TRAVELER at the time, but seems to have been forgotten. We have Pearson's Hall in the city, and spacious school rooms. Why are these not used for temperance lectures.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 30, 1879.

NOTICE. To all whom it may concern. All persons are hereby notified not to sell goods on credit to my wife, Effie Aumann, as I will not be responsible for the payment thereof, she having abandoned me without any cause. WILLIAM AUMANN.

[PRESIDENT'S PROCLAMATION: KEEP OUT OF THE TERRITORY.]

Arkansas City Traveler, May 7, 1879 - Front Page.

KEEP OUT OF THE TERRITORY.
The following proclamation was issued by the President on the 26th.

WHEREAS, It has become known to me that certain evil disposed persons have, within the Territory and jurisdiction of the United States, begun and set on foot preparations for organized and forcible possession of the settlement upon lands of what is known as the Indian Territory, west of the State of Arkansas, which Territory is designated, organized, and described by treaties and laws of the United States and by executive authorities as the Indian's country, and as such is only subject to occupation by Indian tribes, officers of the Indian department, military posts, and such persons as may be privileged to reside and trade therein under the intercourse laws of the United States; and

WHEREAS, These laws provide for the removal of all persons residing and trading therein without express permission of the Indian department and agents, and also of all persons whom such agents may deem improper persons to reside in the Indian country.

Now, therefore, for the purpose of properly protecting the interests of Indian nations and tribes as well as the United States in said Indian Territory, and of the duty of enforcing the laws governing the same, I, Rutherford B. Hayes, President of the United States, do admonish and warn all such persons so intending or preparing to remove upon said lands, or into said Territory, without permission of the proper agents of the Indian department against any attempt to so remove or settle upon any of the lands of said Territory. I do further warn and notify any and all such persons who may so offend that they will be speedily and immediately removed therefrom by the agent according to laws made and provided, and if necessary the aid and assistance of the military forces of the United States will be invoked to carry into proper execution the laws of the United States herein referred to.

In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed. Done at the city of Washington on this, the 26th day of April, and year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and seventy-nine, and of the independence of the United States one hundred and third. R. B. HAYES.

Wm. R. EVARTS, Secretary of State.

[EDITORIAL PAGE: R. R. WITHIN THE NEXT NINETY DAYS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, May 7, 1879.

HO! FOR ARKANSAS CITY, KANSAS!
THE R. R. TO BE BUILT TO THIS PLACE WITHIN THE NEXT
NINETY DAYS!
Croakers and Soreheads get off the Track or you Will Fall
Under the Wheels of the Old Santa Fe!
Hurrah for the Busy Mart of the South West!
Sixty-nine car loads of R. R. iron have arrived at Wichita, to be used on the extension of the Cowley & Sumner R. R. to Arkansas City. With the improvement of the Arkansas river, and the railroad finished to this place, Arkansas City will soon become the most important point in the Southern tier of counties. Having no east or cross road to cut through our city, with way stations every few miles to divide our trade, business will concentrate here, and soon this will become the great Emporium of the South West. Mind that!

[EDITORIAL PAGE: THE STEAM BOAT]

Arkansas City Traveler, May 7, 1879.

THE STEAM BOAT.
The Steamer "None Such," the first boat of the season from the Lower Arkansas, reached this port of entry last Wednesday evening. She is a light draft boat, drawing but eight inches, with side wheels, and designed exclusively for the upriver trade. Capt. Cotton tells us that he met the rise in the river about sixty miles below here, though he feels confident that he could easily have made this port with his trim little steamer, at low water mark.

He passed the Steamer "Cherokee" on her way down, near the Pawnee Landing. The steamer will remain here for two or three days when she will load with one thousand sacks of wheat and return to the lower country.

The "Fletcher," the "Big Rock," and the "Water Witch," are all billed for this port on the mountain rise, and will bring up shingles, lumber, etc., and return with wheat to supply the Dardanelle and Little Rock market.

This is an enterprise that will develop our country, and the beautiful part of the scheme is that Congress is disposed to give us the requisite aid to improve the navigation of the Arkansas without bonds or pledges. As No. 2 wheat is always worth one dollar at Little Rock, farmers can sow a broad acreage this fall, feeling reasonably certain that our home market will, in the future, reward their industry.

[EDITORIAL: INDIAN TERRITORY.]

Arkansas City Traveler, May 7, 1879.

The grand rush for the unassigned lands in the Indian Territory is assuming gigantic proportions. If it should prove to be the method of forcing the Territory open to settlement, it will also demonstrate the fact that a comparative minimum number can set at defense the will of the Government, and throttle its very existence.

[PERSONALS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, May 7, 1879.

ARKANSAS CITY POST OFFICE.
Departure and Arrival of Mails.
WICHITA. Leaves Daily 7 A.M. Arrives 7 P.M.

SILVERDALE, OTTO, AND MAPLE CITY. Leaves Wednesday and Saturday, 7 A.M. Arrives Tuesday and Friday 6 P.M.

KITLEY, GUELPH, AND SOUTH HAVEN. Leaves Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday, 7 A.M. Arrives Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday 6 P.M.

EUREKA. Leaves Thursday, 4:30 P.M. Arrives 4 P.M.

SALT CITY AND CLAREDALE. Leaves Saturday 6 A.M. Arrives Friday 6 P.M.

Office hours7:30 A.M. to 9 P.M. Sundays from 12 to 1 P.M.

Money Order and Register Department open from 8 A.M. to 6 P.M.

NATHAN HUGHES, Postmaster.
Arkansas City Traveler, May 7, 1879.

A. A. Newman returned from the East last Thursday.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 7, 1879.

E. P. Kinne called last Friday and handed in complete returns of election, as follows: For 1593, Against 410.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 7, 1879.

The rains last week swelled the rivers and creeks bank full. That accounts for the delay of nearly twenty-four hours of last Wednesday's mail.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 7, 1879.

Mr. Mantor, the father of the big boy, Tom, has moved onto East Summit street. We miss the old gentleman very much as he was a near neighbor and a good one.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 7, 1879.

DIED. April 29th, 1879, a daughter of S. and Emma J. Cattrell, from being bitten by a rattlesnake. Aged 1 year 8 months and 19 days. She was bitten about 3 o'clock p.m., and died about 11 p.m. S. C.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 7, 1879.

We will bet a pound of the best bull beef in this market that the suit in the District court of Somers vs. Somers for divorce will not reach trial. Pat. had an offer for the farm last week and came down Saturday night with prayers and promises that enabled him to wind his arm around the neck of the old lady and trot her home. Pat. married seven years ago, but he and Betsey have been out before, this being the annual suit between the parties for divorce.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 7, 1879.

The M. E. Social will meet at the residence of Mr. French next Friday evening, May 9th. All are cordially invited.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 7, 1879.

Mrs. R. C. Haywood left for Topeka last Thursday morning, where she will remain with Mr. Haywood while he is engaged in settling the estate of his brother.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 7, 1879.

A. W. Patterson has repaired and refitted his saloon in modern style. Those acquainted with the business inform us that Pat. has the best rooms in Southern Kansas.

[EDITORIAL PAGE: MILITARY FORCE ALONG INDIAN TERRITORY LINE.]

Arkansas City Traveler, May 14, 1879.

The General Government is placing military force along the line of the Indian Territory for the purpose of resisting invasion onto the unassigned lands therein. During the last few days quite a number of teams have passed through our city on their way to these lands. Government having arrested the tide of squatters flowing into the Territory via Coffeyville, Chetopa, and other points in the Southeast part of Kansas, there seems to be a preconcerted movement to rendezvous at, or near here, and all move together for the Territory.

This looks to us like a hasty unwise step. The Government is resolved to put all invaders out of the Territory, and we advise all who are not seeking a pitched battle to keep out of there. Those who really desire to test the strength of Uncle Samuel can go in on their muscle and take the consequences.

The old fraudC. C. Carpenterwho has led so many of our people into this ambush is a sore backed, crooked legged, cross-eyed cuss. Every old Kansan knows his record for the last fifteen years, and they know him to be a fraud from his inception. Now we will say to all readers of the TRAVELER, don't be led off by any such a creature. You can't afford to bring upon yourselves the trouble and loss his followers will surely meet. Carpenter has fled to parts unknown, and is not to be found by the military when his company is so desirable.

Whenever Congress is disposed to pass an enabling act to organize a Territorial Government, it will be time enough to change your residence. Those who go before this event, will surely come to grief.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 7, 1879.

A Scheme of Plunder.
The New York Sun, Democratic, denounces the invasion of the Indian Territory by lawless white men in very bitter language.

It says:

"A scheme of plunder and villainy, greater and bolder, perhaps, than any other that has even been deliberately conceived, perfectly organized, and effectively put in operation since the United States came into existence is now in active progress, with its headquarters at Kansas City, its tools in Washington, both in the lobby and on the floor of Congress, and its agents in every part of the Southwest. The name and purpose of the Oklahoma Ring have been vaguely familiar to the public for several years. The development of this Ring's plan to steal the Indian Territory, to grab millions of acres of Government lands, crowding out the civilized tribes and building colossal private fortunes upon the ruins of Government treaties, has come to that stage where it is necessary that full light be let upon its iniquity."

The Government declares its intention to maintain the laws and prevent the invasion of the Indian Territory. General Sheridan instead of General Pope as first announced will take active measures to enforce the treaties in accordance with the President's proclamation. Twelve hundred troops will compose this first command. More will be forthcoming if necessary. The Capitol.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 7, 1879.

The Auditor of State has just forwarded to Washington a list of 225,000 acres of indemnity school lands. The claim of Kansas for the sixth and thirty sixth sections Indian reservations is the first and only one of the kind allowed to any State.

[EDITORIAL PAGE: ARTICLE RE STEAMER JOHN G. FLETCHER.]

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, May 14, 1879.

The river is on a stand with 9 feet and 7 ft., 10 inches, by the United States gauge, but from reports above there have been very heavy rains, so we can look for a big river, and planters can take it in time.

The steamer "John G. Fletcher" left the levee this morning and went up to the Cairo and Fulton railroad landing for 50,000 feet of lumber for Arkansas City, Kansas. She also will take other freight and passengers. It will be a pleasant trip. So passengers going to Colorado or Leadville will find it to their advantage to consult Capt. Hennegin. He also takes freight for Dardanelle, Webb City, Fort Smith, and Fort Gibson, leaving on Thursday at 5 p.m. It will take two weeks to make the round trip, the distance being 850 miles from Little Rock. Capt. Hennegin will have the pleasure of taking the first boat through of her size, for which he deserves great credit. Democrat.

[MORE ITEMS ON EDITORIAL PAGE.]

Arkansas City Traveler, May 14, 1879

NOTICE. Anyone knowing the whereabouts of Francis X. O'Brien, a printer, formerly of California and Nevada, but more recently an employee of this office, will confer a great favor by sending his address to the undersigned. When last heard from he was en route to Winfield, Wellington, or Arkansas City.

G. A. MARTIN, Publisher, Herald, Wichita, Kansas.
Arkansas City Traveler, May 14, 1879.

The wheat in this part of the country is totally ruined. It is beaten into the ground and broken off, until the once verdant fields look blank and bare as an autumnal forest. The loss is irreparable, and falls with crushing weight on our farmers. Wellington Press.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 14, 1879.

The following is a fair estimate of the average yield of agricultural products in Cowley County.

Winter wheat, 22 bu. per acre; Rye, 32 bu. per acre; Corn, 42 bu. per acre; Barley, 25 bu. per acre; Oats, 35 bu. per acre; Oats, 35 bu. per acre; Buckwheat, 20 bu. per acre; Potatoes, Irish, 120 bu. per acre; Sweet potatoes, 175 bu. per acre; Castor Beans, 16 bu. per acre; Flax, 11 bu. per acre.

Sorghum, 125 gal. per acre; Cotton, 200 lbs. per acre; Tobacco, 700 lbs. per acre; Broom Corn, 800 lbs. per acre; Millet, 2.62 tons per acre; Hungarian, 2.62 tons per acre; Timothy, 1.25 tons per acre; Clover, 2.50 tons per acre; and Prairie hay, 2 tons per acre.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 14, 1879.

Camp Detachment U. S. Troops.
ARKANSAS CITY, KANS., May 13th, 1879.

All parties intending to settle in the Indian Territory are hereby notified that such settlement is contrary to law, and if attempted, will be followed by forcible expulsion therefrom.

W. W. BARRETT,
Lt. Colonel U. S. A.
Commanding Detachment.
[PERSONALS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, May 14, 1879.

Col. Whiteman is up from the Ponca Agency.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 14, 1879.

Why don't the young folks organize an Archery club?

Arkansas City Traveler, May 14, 1879.

Several new houses going up in the north part of town.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 14, 1879.

Dr. Reed has completed his new house just west of town.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 14, 1879.

Prof. Wilkinson and wife spent a few days in the city last week.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 14, 1879.

"Ten Nights in a Bar-Room" next Friday night at the M. E. Church.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 14, 1879.

A new sidewalk has been put down in front of the new Bank building.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 14, 1879.

Honors due Mayor Mitchell for the improved condition of Summit Street.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 14, 1879.

R. A. Houghton, of Ponca Agency, spent a few days in the city last week.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 14, 1879.

A squad of soldiers are here to keep the invaders out of the Indian Territory.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 14, 1879.

That duck pond is finally filled up!!! Now let the city council drain that slough on the southwest of town, and benefit the health of the city.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 14, 1879.

The celebrated horse, Tom Thumb, was sold at sheriff's sale last Saturday for $40.50. Frank Speers was the purchaser.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 14, 1879.

Theron Houghton, Miss Hattie Houghton, and Mrs. R. A. Houghton made a flying visit to the Ponca Agency, returning Monday evening.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 14, 1879.

Gardner Mott has been appointed City Marshal in the place of Mr. James Morgan, who, on account of sickness, has been unable to attend to the business pertaining thereto.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 14, 1879.

A. H. Green, of Winfield, has been commissioned Brigadier General of the State Militia. Green knows how to run a first-class real estate agency, and we have no doubt he will do equally well in bleeding for his country.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 14, 1879.

James L. Huey, W. D. Roberts, and W. B. Norman have been appointed by the District Court of Cowley County the committee to condemn the right of way for the Cowley, Sumner & Fort Smith R. R. through this county.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 14, 1879.

Boys, Marshal Mott is on his ear, and is determined to preserve order in town. The Marshal has seen service at the front, and if you don't want to feel his war club around your ears, avoid bad whiskey, attend Sunday school, and repeat that little verse just before you slip between the sheets.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 14, 1879.

Hotel Arrivals.
The following is a list of arrivals at the hotels since May 8th, 1879.

CENTRAL AVENUE HOTEL.
Henry Elinger, Augusta, Kansas.

J. B. Blaker, Augusta, Kansas.

John Ryan, Augusta, Kansas.

R. J. Hans, Kansas City, Mo.

Dick Wagstaff, Kansas City, Mo.

W. C. Robinson, Leavenworth, Kansas.

Col. W. W. Barrett, U. S. A.

W. H. Whiteman, Ponca Agency.

B. Barnaby, Ponca Agency.

E. Harnnessy, Montreal.

Ike Levy, Sterling, Kansas.

B. M. Terrell, Winfield, Kansas.

Capt. Sanford, Winfield, Kansas.

O. B. Acton, Salt City.

Gen. C. H. Smith, U. S. A.

Gen. H. Cook, Agt., 19th Infantry, U. S. A.

Jim Wilbaurn, St. Louis.

ARKANSAS CITY HOUSE.
Jake Hunter, South Haven.

J. T. Warris, South Haven.

C. H. Redwood, Independence, Kans.

J. C. Evans, Winfield, Kansas.

Noah McCoy, Sumner County.

D. B. Newell, Independence, Kas.

S. R. Musselman, Grouse Creek.

Tip North, Belle Plain.

J. F. Capehart, Wichita, Kas.

M. F. Hastings, Wellington, Kas.

E. Turner, Harts Mills, Kans.

Mitchel, Ponca Agency.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 14, 1879.

The following is a list of new subscribers to the TRAVELER since our last issue:

ARKANSAS CITY
J. H. Randall

Wm. E. Hathaway

J. W. Pearson

L. B. Gorman

J. M. Felton

M. Stanton

Geo. W. Ford

Thos. Goatley

G. W. Maness

R. E. Fitzpatrick

M. C. Edwards

John Felton

G. M. Wagstaff

Geo. Russell

Scott & Chapel

A. R. Richmond

WINFIELD: C. P. Ward, N. Haight.

TANNEHILL: S. D. James, W. B. Anderson.

MAPLE CITY
H. S. Libby

B. Mathis

F. W. Nance

J. B. Schofield

J. A. Ryan

John Bobbett

O. P. Cessna

J. R. Lobsin

David Davis

A. O. Tolles

F. P. Myers

L. H. Kritsinger

SILVERDALE: E. C. Hawkins, John Algeo, Reubin Mackley.

OTTO: D. M. Jay.

RED BUD: J. B. Norman.

GRAYVILLE, ILLINOIS: Joseph Naylas.

HUNTSVILLE, ALABAMA: W. C. Wells.

PILOT GROVE, MISSOURI: A. E. Beeson.

BARDOLPH, ILLINOIS: E. D. Stevens.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 14, 1879.

What's become of the street sprinkler?

Arkansas City Traveler, May 14, 1879.

HOTELS crowded with strangers looking for locations.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 14, 1879.

The new verandah adds wonderfully to the appearance of the Central Avenue.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 14, 1879.

Joseph Schuster has opened a boot and shoe store in the Jim Mitchell building.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 14, 1879.

BORN. In Silverdale Township, to Mr. and Mrs. M. A. Musselman, a son, May 5th, 1879.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 14, 1879.

Mr. Hargis, of Wichita, was down last week with a view of locating a flouring mill in this vicinity.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 14, 1879.

Look out for the boat, John G. Fletcher, which will be up the last of the week. Read the notice of her departure in another column.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 14, 1879.

Judge Knight of Arkansas City has been appointed stenographer for the judicial district by the presiding Judge. A good selection.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 14, 1879.

Wm. Moore, Proprietor of the lime kiln southeast of town, started for Colorado last week to see the country and no more lime may be expected from him this summer.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 14, 1879.

We received a call from Mr. Manser on Monday last. Mr. Manser is a live real estate agent in Winfield and those who place their business in his care will make a good selection. Try Curns and Manser.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 14, 1879.

Mr. Sprague and T. A. Wilkinson, both of Winfield, went in for a knock down argument last week, and Tom drove convictions home to his antagonist. This results from the fact that Tom once lived in our city and has sand in his craw.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 14, 1879.

Keep it before the people that the Cowley, Sumner & Fort Smith R. R. will reach here the coming fall. The appropriation for the Arkansas river will be used in improving navigation this season, and hence, two highways to market will be secured. Now is the time to make investments of capital in this city, and those who take advantage of these circumstances will become the fortunate ones.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 14, 1879.

LISTING PEOPLE WHO PARTICIPATED IN THE DRAMA "TEN NIGHTS IN A BAR-ROOM" GIVEN AT THE M. E. CHURCH, FRIDAY EVENING, MAY 16, 1879, FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE M. E. CHURCH.

C. H. SYLVESTER, E. F. BANTON, C. M. SWARTS, J. A. LEONARD, C. M. McINTIRE, C. L. SWARTS, S. B. REED, MISS NELLIE SWARTS, MISS HATTIE HOUGHTON, MISS EMMA MITCHELL, MISS LAURA GREGG.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 14, 1879.

We had the pleasure of meeting Mr. Gillelen and his bride last week at Topeka. Mrs. Gillelen is a niece of Mrs. Gov. St. John and brings to her new home the many charms that render life delightful.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 14, 1879.

Mr. Bohle, of St. Louis, flour Inspector for the Government, is at the Central Avenue. R. B. is a businessman and can inspect more flour in a single day than you can eat in a thousand years.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 14, 1879.

We are in receipt of letters from Senator Plumb and Hon. Thomas Ryan expressing views very decidedly against the movement of those who contemplate settlement in the Indian Territory and advising all who wish to avoid trouble to decline going there as it is a direct violation of law.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 14, 1879

DIED. Clarissa Alda Cattrell, daughter of S. and Emma J. Cattrell, May 9th, A. D. 1879, aged 3 years 9 months and 19 days.

This is the second daughter that Mr. and Mrs. Cattrell have lost within the last eleven days. The death notice of the first child appeared in the TRAVELER last week as our readers will recall, from the bite of a rattlesnake.

[EDITORIAL PAGE: COUNTY COURTHOUSE.]

Arkansas City Traveler, May 21, 1879.

The question whether we shall put up for repairs on the courthouse will soon be presented to the County Commissioners for their decision. Five years ago this same courthouse was constructed at a cost to the taxpayers of Cowley County of thirty one thousand dollars. Has this debt against the county yet been paid? We think not. And the question that will sooner or later address itself to the mind of every taxpayer at the rate we are plunging headlong into debt is simply whether we will possess the ability to pay. No doubt it is good policy to provide a vault, where the records can remain secure from theft or fire, and this can be done at no very great cost, but it appears to us that the correct policy for a wise people to pursue is to begin to pay off our debts before we saddle additional ones upon us. The clamor for public improvement is generally the first that is heard in a new country and when the necessities of the case demand it or the surroundings justify it, then it is a wise policy. But to stand ever ready to increase taxation simply because some other town or country has done the same before us is in our opinion, the direct road to ruin. We have counties in our young commonwealth with an experience in building and improving beyond ability to pay, that it will be wise for this county to avoid. We are now at the toll gate. Before we go further in that direction, suppose we commence to pay up.

[LETTER FROM C. M. SCOTT: TERRITORY MATTERS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, May 21, 1879.

Territory MattersLetter from C. M.
EDITOR TRAVELER:

At your suggestion I will give you a few brief items from the land of the red man, from which I have just returned after three weeks absence, a ride of 600 miles on horseback from Arkansas City to Camp Supply, via way of Cheyenne Agency and Fort Reno, Fort Bennett, and up the North Fork of the Canadian into the Pan Handle of Texas.

All through the northern part of the Territory we met bone hunters gathering buffalo bones for sale at Dodge City and Wichita. They usually take down corn and bring back a load of bones for which they get $7.50 per ton. I don't know what they get for corn, but it retails at $1 per bushel all through the northern part of the Territory and at 2½ cents per pound, or $1.50 per bushel at Camp Supply. We conversed with several owners of large herds of stock that declared their intentions to make Arkansas City their headquarters this fall.

James Steen was on the road with 900 head of ponies, and is probably at Caldwell now. Others were behind him with from one to three hundred head. All horned stock looked a little thin on account of the hard winter, and grass was short for want of rain. Young stockyear- lings and two year oldscould not be bought; there were none for sale but thousands on the range. On our way back we visited the camp of the Patrol Guards and found them active and ready to meet the wayward Cheyennes, but there is none to meet except those that freight from Wichita to the Agency.

The roads were almost lined with immigrants to Harper and Barbour counties, and wild schemers on their way to Leadville.

Deer, elk, turkeys, wolves, and antelope were numerous, but the buffalo were all in New Mexico, and will not be seen within 200 miles of Arkansas City before July or August, when they will range north.

The Indians were all quiet and peaceable, and many of them planting corn and putting up fences. Occasionally a white whiskey seller ventures in, but Agent Miles has the reputation of knowing a rogue at first sight a mile off, so it is not often attempted.

You may wonder that we ever returned under those circumstances; but we did, and found the town improved to such an extent we hardly knew it. Yours, C. M.

[EDITORIAL PAGE: RIGHTS OF INDIANS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, May 21, 1879. Editorial Page.

Rights of Indians.
A new and curious habeas corpus case has just terminated in the U. S. Court at Omaha.

Standing Bear, with twenty-five other Indians of the Ponca tribe, had been removed to the Indian Territory against their will. They escaped and went North, were arrested by the military authorities of the United States, and are being taken back.

At Omaha the Indians sued out a writ of habeas corpus, and were brought before the United States Court. During the examination Standing Bear was allowed to address the Court on his own behalf. A correspondent of the St. Louis Republican says that "his oration was marked by its intense feeling and eloquence. It was a strange sight to see the red man in all his gorgeous attire defending himself and followers before a court of justice. Standing Bear is a man of rare ability for an Indian, and during the reading of the Court's opinion today, he was present with his handsome wife, Susette, and others of his tribe, and at the close of the reading they received their liberty and congratulations of friends with feelings of great joy."

The opinion of the Judge was exhaustive. We quote the concluding paragraph. He said:

"That Gen. Geo. Cook, the respondent, being the commander of the military department of the Platte, had the custody of the relators, under color of authority of the United States and in violation of the laws; that no rightful authority exists for the removing by force any of the relators to the Indian Territory as the respondent has been directed to do; that the Indians possess the inherent right of expatriation, as well as the more fortunate white race, and have the inalienable right to `life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness,' so long as they obey the laws and do not trespass on forbidden ground, and being restrained of liberty under color of authority of the United States, and in violation of the laws thereof, the relators must be discharged from custody, and it is so ordered."

Under this decision, there is nothing to prohibit the Cheyennes, the Poncas, the Nez Perces, and other tribes now held by force in the Indian Territory from immediately taking up their line of march for the North. The District Attorney has given notice of an appeal, but the courts set the Indians free to go on their way rejoicing during the meantime. Commonwealth.

[PERSONALS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, May 21, 1879.

Pay your poll tax.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 21, 1879.

James Huey is a candidate for treasurer of Cowley County.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 21, 1879.

C. R. Haywood and wife returned from Topeka last Thursday night.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 21, 1879.

Mr. Snow starts a new barber shop on the North side of the Green Front.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 21, 1879.

Several parties from Winfield are preparing to go into business in this city.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 21, 1879.

Gen. McNiel, U. S. Indian Inspector, was at the Central Avenue Hotel over Sunday.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 21, 1879.

DIED. Of consumption, May 14th, at his residence in Arkansas City, James Morgan.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 21, 1879.

A new stock of hardware is to go into the building formerly occupied by Kellogg & Hoyt.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 21, 1879.

Why doesn't the Mayor put up a new block on the opposite corner from the TRAVELER office?

Arkansas City Traveler, May 21, 1879.

Daniel Hunt and wife called and left a year's subscription for the TRAVELER last Saturday.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 21, 1879.

S. P. Channel is the boss gardener of the city, dining on new potatoes and green peas on the 16th.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 21, 1879.

The Small trial for the murder of Starbuck occupied the District Court the whole of last week.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 21, 1879.

The reputation of Dr. M. R. Leonard's grape wine is on the spread. The demand for this article is increasing, and its good qualities are proverbial.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 21, 1879.

A full blood Kaw Indian brought butter of his squaw's manufacture to the Agency market one day last week. Good time to read this local is on an empty stomach.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 21, 1879.

Mr. Ridenour has moved his stock of jewelry into the room on the south side of Channell & McLaughlin's real estate office.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 21, 1879.

A company of Cavalry from Ft. Reno reported to Col. Barrett, commanding the detachment here in camp, at 6 o'clock p.m., Saturday last. Those who love their country are fond of seeing the boys in blue.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 21, 1879.

Sheriff Harter was in town yesterday looking up delinquents.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 21, 1879.

Joe Sherburne has returned from his long absence in purchasing Ponca cows. Joe is in luck.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 21, 1879.

Mr. James W. Wright, of Oxford, called and informed us that Mr. James Stan had reached Bluff Creek, South of Caldwell, with 940 head of Texas ponies, and would be glad to meet all his old friends.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 21, 1879.

The people over in Bolton held a picnic in Moore's grove last Saturday afternoon. In the evening a dance took place at the Bland Schoolhouse and everything passed off lovely.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 21, 1879.

Miss Lilly Walton was seriously injured a few days ago at the Pawnee Agency, by being thrown from a horse. We hope she may soon recover. Through her efforts the school at the Agency has made proficiency that is truly wonderful.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 21, 1879.

Mr. and Mrs. Temple, of Missouri, left Winfield in company with Pres Walker last Thursday afternoon to come down to Mrs. Elizabeth Wright's, and at the turn in the road, near the house, the buggy was upset and the parties thrown to the ground. Mrs. Temple received considerable injury. A messenger was dispatched to the city for a physician.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 21, 1879.

The party who swore out a warrant for the arrest of some of the squad, for assault, obtained a fine of seven dollars against them. Squire Christian took the view that it was a breach of the peace to draw blood on a fool and entered the above fine. Our view has always been that when a man (or a woman for that matter) starts out on a raid, itching for trouble, the place ought to be scratched.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 21, 1879.

The trial of Small for the murder of Starbuck resulted in the conviction of the defendant of manslaughter and five years in the State prison. Five years for deliberate murder? This is a disgrace to Cowley County. Why, the cow thief was sent up for four years and six months, and yet the life of a fellow man, in Cowley Co., is worth but a trifle more than three cowsso say the jury! Small's own testimony, before a competent jury, is strong enough to convict him of murder. We say, if we have a law, let us live by the law, as good citizens; but it is just such verdicts as this against Small that gives a complexion of justice to vigilantes in hanging the culprit and the jury to the same rope. We have had enough of this in Cowley Co. It is time to stop.

[EDITORIAL PAGE: COWLEY & SUMNER R. R., ETC.]

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, May 28, 1879.

Keep it before the people that ground will be broken for the grade on the Cowley & Sumner R. R. between Arkansas City and Winfield by the first of July next. The boom is heard all along the line that Arkansas City, with her superior advantages for trade and her close proximity to the Indian Territory, is to become the boss town in Southwest Kansas. Bear it in mind, ye who are in search of the best locations, that no town in the Southwest has as bright prospects in the early future as this city. With the Santa Fe road at this place, controlling the shipment of vast herds of Texas cattle and a home market for everything the farmer produces, the growth of the town will be hasty and healthy. There will be no towns east, west, or south to spring up along the line of the road to divert and divide our trade at stations on an East line, as ours is but one road, and trade will naturally center at the termini.

These are facts that the thoughtful man will consider before he invests in hopes of profit. It has been the history of most towns, that cannot count their population by thousands, that the cross road has been their doom. The town that builds a lasting trade must have few rivals, and tributary to it, must be a productive country.

This is the situation at Arkansas City. On every side is spread out a garden as beautiful as Moses saw in the Promised Land. Come and enter it.

[JIMMY CHRISTIAN - ATTORNEY FOR KEOKUK, CHIEF OF SAC AND FOX.]

Arkansas City Traveler, May 28, 1879.

THE RIGHTS OF INDIANS.
The decision at Omaha, that the Indians have the same right to go where they please as whites, brings to mind a similar decision by the Supreme Court of Kansas, some ten years ago.

Keokuk, a Chief of the Sac and Fox tribe, wanted to go to Washington to see his "Great Father." The Indian Agent said Keokuk should not go because there was no appropriation to pay his expenses. Keokuk said he would pay his own expenses and started, and got to Lawrence, where the Agent had him arrested and brought before a U. S. Commissioner who put him in jail, as Jimmy Christian, his attorney said, "with thieves, robbers, and other vile characters." After a few days he was discharged under a habeas writ. He brought suit in the District Court for false imprisonment. He got a judgment against the Agent, and the case was taken to the Supreme Court of Kansas. Judge Kingman, in rendering a decision sustaining the judgment of the court below, said he could find no law to make it an offense for an Indian to go to Washington if he wanted to and paid his own bills.

He said that under no law, human or Divine, could he be subject to arrest and imprisonment by anyone. The opinion concluded by saying: "His rights are regulated by law for redress, it is not in the power of any tribunal to say you are an Indian and your rights rest in the arbitrary decision of executive officers, and not in the law." The case is reported fully in the 6:h Kansas reports, page 94. Commonwealth.

[THE STEAMER "CHEROKEE."]

Arkansas City Traveler, May 28, 1879.

From the Headquarters of the Arkansas.
The little steamer Cherokee made its appearance at our wharf on Monday last from Arkansas City, Kansas, 444 miles above this place by U. S. measurement, Captain McClaskey in command with a crew of eleven men. The Cherokee brought 800 bushels of fine wheat and reports the river low, yet navigable for small boats. She met the John G. Fletcher above Webber's falls, discharging her lumber and preparing to return. Had the Fletcher started a week sooner, she would have reached Arkansas City without trouble and sold her lumber at a fair profit and could have brought 20,000 bushels of wheat down on the June rise. Good wheat is worth from 50 to 60 cents at Arkansas City, and here about $1.00. The wheat brought here is of a superior quality. Arkansas City is in Cowley County, Kansas, and has about 800 inhabitants. Winfield, the county seat, has about 2,000; population of the county is about 18,000. There are four papers in the county, three Republican and one Democratic, the reverse of this county, which has three Democratic papers to one Republican. This in a great measure is an index of the kind of people there, and accounts for the rapid development of that region, which was a wild country but half a dozen years ago.

Ft. Smith New Era.

[REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, May 28, 1879.

Real Estate Transfers.
M. G. Troup, Co. Clerk, to Channell & McLaughlin, lt. 9, block 24, lts. 14, 13, and 2, blk. 146, lt. 28, blk. 145, lt. 1, blk. 146, lt. 27, blk. 143, lt. 15, blk. 128, lt. 15, blk. 129, lt. 24, blk. 67, lts. 15 and 16, blk. 103, lts. 26 and 27, blk. 59, lt. 16, blk. 27, lt. 24, blk. 48, lot 29, blk. 59, lt. 25, blk. 48, lt. 8, blk. 24, lt. 15, blk. 27, lt. 14, blk. 52, lts 1, 5, 6, 7, 13, and 12, blk. 24, lts. 15 and 16, blk. 48, lt. 14, blk. 24, lts. 1, 3, 8, 27 and 28, blk. 50, Ark. City.

H. H. McLaughlin to S. P. Channell, und. 1/2 lt. 9, blk. 8, Ark. City.

Channell & McLaughlin to W. S. Houghton, lt. 13, blk. 69, Ark. City.

Same to Ida Patterson and Cora Gibbs, lt. 9, blk. 80, Ark. City.

U. S. to L. S. Kibbe ne 1/4 s26, t30, r4.

G. A. McKee and wife to P. G. Rude, lts. 16, 17, 19 and 20, blk. 13, Lazette.

F. M. Small and wife to W. P. Hackney and J. W. McDonald, n 1/2 of nw 1/4 8, 32, 6.

S. T. Suenson and wife to M. Johnson und. 1/2 lts. 10, 11, 12, blk. 113, Winfield.

N. J. Fullerlove and wife to Schiffbauer Bros., lts. 24, 25 and 26, blk. 72, Ark. City.

John Headrick to H. Buckley, e 1/2 of nw 1/4 of se 1/4 and lt. off n side of sw 1/4 of se 1/4 s33, t32, r4.

S. Harrington and husband to S. M. Libbey, lt. on se 3/4 nw 1/2 27, 32, 4.

D. H. Sleeth to W. M. Sleeth, lt. 26, blk. 81, Ark. City.

M. A. Millington and husband to J. M. Wallis, lt. 9, blk. 111, Winfield.

H. J. Sanford and wife to Max Solton, sw 1/4 of ne 1/4 and nw 1/8 of sw 1/4, 2, 31, 5.

S. D. Pryor and wife to Jas. Call, se 1/4 27, 33, 4.

G. Mott and wife to J. M. Holloway, lt. 22, blk. 132, Ark. City.

A. A. Newman and wife to J. M. Holloway, lts. 9 and 21, blk. 132, Ark. City.

Jas. Call and wife to Chas. Thomas, se 1/4, 27, 33, 4.

C. L. Harter, Sheriff, to J. C. McMullen, lots 4, 5 and 6, s1, t35, r3.

S. E. Hunt and husband to W. S. Houghton, lts. 14, 15 and 16, blk. 132, Ark. City.

McGuire and Crippen and wives to G. W. Armstrong, se 1/4, 22, 32, 6.

C. Davis and husband to E. J. Ferguson, lts. 13 and 14, blk. 128, Winfield.

T. McIntire and wife to W. S. Houghton, lot 11, blk. 132, Ark. City.

Abbie Tales et al to W. M. Sleeth, lot 8, blk. 71, Ark. City.

H. Atkinson to B. Snow, lots 26 and 18, blk. 142, Ark. City.

S. P. Channell and wife to T. H. McLaughlin, undivided 1/3 of lots 3 and 4 and e 1/2 of s.w. 1/4 s7 t35 r3.

G. Mott and wife to G. M. Wagstaff, lots 24 and 25, blk. 79, Ark. City.

M. G. Troup to W. M. Sleeth and H. P. Farrar, lot 11, blk. 80, lots 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 12, 13 and 14, blk. 19, and lots 1, 2, 3, and 4, blk. 16 and lot 9, blk. 55, Ark. City.

M. G. Troup to W. M. Sleeth and H. P. Farrar, lot 11, blk. 80, lots 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 12, 13 and 14, blk. 10, and lots 1, 2, 3, and 4, blk. 16 and lot 9, blk. 55, Ark. City.

M. G. Troup to Channell & McLaughlin, lot 26, blk. 27, lot 4, blk. 28, lots 1, 2, 3 and 4, blk. 56 and lots 12, 13, and 14, blk. 139, and lot 16, blk. 52, lot 7, blk. 67, Ark. City.

J. N. Fuller to W. S. Houghton, lots 15, 16, 17 and 18, blk. 65, Ark. City.

H. M. Kinsie and husband to Channell & McLaughlin, lot 13, blk. 68, Ark. City.

S. E. Hunt and husband to H. M. Kinsie, lot 13, blk. 69, Ark. City.

[PERSONALS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, May 28, 1879

CHEW Jackson's Best Sweet Navy Tobacco.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 28, 1879

Trot out the sprinkler.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 28, 1879

Butter 15 cents a pound.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 28, 1879

Green peas in the market.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 28, 1879

Garden sass in good demand.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 28, 1879

Another wedding on the tapis.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 28, 1879

Wheat ninety-eight cents in Wichita.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 28, 1879

Dr. Shepard returned on Friday last.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 28, 1879

The present term of school closes Friday.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 28, 1879

The Strawberry Festival was well attended.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 28, 1879

City crowded and overrunning with strangers.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 28, 1879

Two more cottages nearly completed on the east side of town.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 28, 1879

S. P. Channell presented his wife with a Mathenshek piano.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 28, 1879

Mrs. L. H. Gardner started for Leadville, Colorado, Tuesday last.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 28, 1879

The man who took the turning plow from M. R. Leonard's, last April, will please call at this office.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 28, 1879

The mountain rise is on its way down the Arkansas, and is already raising the waters at this place.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 28, 1879

A heavy shower of rain fell here on Monday afternoon, saturating the ground about four inches.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 28, 1879

LOST. On last Thursday, a gold cuff pin. Anyone finding the same will confer a favor by returning to this office.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 28, 1879

A little more paint on Summit Street will add much to its appearance. Suppose the Mayor puts a coat on the Meat Market.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 28, 1879

Will Stewart has gone to Parsons to reside. The people of Parsons will find him a lively man and a good citizen.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 28, 1879

If the man who examined the empty razor case at Schiffbauer's on Monday last will return, he can see the razor he desired.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 28, 1879

The steamer, Cherokee, was at Ft. Smith on the 19th. She will there discharge her cargo and return up the river immediately.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 28, 1879

The contractors on the Cowley, Sumner and Ft. Smith R. R. are advertising for men to work, offering to pay $1.50 per day. No need of tramps.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 28, 1879.

The body of an unknown man was discovered in the Arkansas river at Wichita last week. The brain of the unfortunate victim was pierced with a bullet.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 28, 1879.

We met Dr. Davis at Winfield last Saturday, and the pleasure of other hours passed with him were recalled to memory. The Dr. is a genial companion and a type of Kentucky's noblest sons.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 28, 1879.

Theron Houghton started for Wisconsin last Monday, where he expects to join his wife and go on a visit to Maine. He has our best wishes for a pleasant trip, and we know that he will return feeling that the New West has charms for him.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 28, 1879.

A Card. I take this method to return my most heartfelt thanks to the many friends of my deceased husband, James M. Morgan, for the kindness and assistance rendered him in his last illness, and for the sympathizing benevolence extended to me in the hour of my greatest sorrow. SYDNA A. MORGAN.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 28, 1879.

A new billiard hall in town. No whiskey!

Arkansas City Traveler, May 28, 1879.

NOTICE AL. HORN'S new "ad" in another column.

AD: CITY BOOT & SHORE STORE.

I desire to call attention to the Assortment of BOOTS AND SHOES,

That I have in stock at present, which I propose to sell at so small a profit that the people MUST BUY! I ALSO MANUFACTURE BOOTS AND SHOES, and keep constantly on hand a large Stock of the best Leather, and GUARANTEE GOOD WORK And satisfactory prices. Fashionable and durable work assured in all cases. REPAIRING NEATLY DONE. Call and see me and be convinced. AL. HORN.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 28, 1879.

We are pleased to see our young friend, Judge Knight, back again to remain with us until the August term of Court. Judge Campbell could not have made a better selection as stenographer for his district.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 28, 1879.

Information has been received from the Contract office, P. O. Department, Washington, that they will receive bids up to July 10, 1879, for carrying the mail from Arkansas City, via Ponca Agency, Pawnee Agency, and Sac and Fox Agency to Okmulgee, 190 miles and back, twice a week. Time through, 60 hours. Blanks and other information will be furnished at the office in this city. Service to commence October 1st, 1879. NATHAN HUGHES, P. M.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 28, 1879.

On Thursday last a large party of grangers gathered on the banks of the Walnut, southeast of the city, and passed the day in fishing. As A. A. Newman has placed in his dam a fish race, the finny tribe came down the river in shoals, and it looked as though the last fish in the Walnut had come to the angling. About two barrels of fish were caught when the party returned to their homes satisfied with their days work.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 28, 1879.

MARRIED.
McCLENAHAN - THOMPSON. In the United Presbyterian Church, on the evening of 21st inst., by the Rev. S. McClung, assisted by the bride's father, the Rev. R. S. McClenahan and Miss Mattie H. Thompson, daughter of Rev. David Thompson.

BELL - FRANSISCO. At the residence of the bride's father, May 24th, 1879, by Rev. W. H. Rose, Mr. J. Lawrence Bell, of Silver Dale, Cowley Co., Kan., and Miss Lotta R. Fransisco, of Arkansas City, Cowley Co., Kan.

CAPRON - CROCKER. By Rev. Platter at Winfield, Wednesday, May 21st, Mr. Manley E. Capron and Miss Ella A. Crocker.

HERBERT - CHAMBERS. At the residence of the bride's father, in East Bolton, this night, John Herbert and Miss Mattie Chambers. The occasion will require the services of two officiating clergymen.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 28, 1879.

Work is progressing on the railroad grade south of Wichita. Five miles of grading have been let between this place and Winfield.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 28, 1879.

All members of Co. C. (Bolton Militia), are requested to meet at the Bland Schoolhouse on Saturday, May 31st, at 2 o'clock for the purpose of signing the muster rolls.

R. HUFFMASTER, Captain.
Arkansas City Traveler, May 28, 1879.

Mr. Gooch will commence today to cut fifty acres of wheat on his farm east of town.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 28, 1879.

FOR SALE. The best pair of mares in Creswell Township. Also, a light harness. Terms Cash. Inquire at this office.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 28, 1879.

New Goods expected at MANTOR & BLAKENEY'S.

[EDITORIAL PAGE.]

Arkansas City Traveler, June 4, 1879.

D. W. BUSHYHEAD, Treasurer of the Cherokee Nation, we are informed, has established an office at Caldwell, for the purpose of collecting taxes on cattle and other stock grazing in the Indian Territory.

We advise the stock men to resist the payment of this tax, and, if necessary, to make a case and test it before Judge Barker, at Fort Smith. We have been through this question, from head to foot, with the Solicitor of the Interior Department, and think we are as well informed on this subject as any agent of the black and tan Cherokee Council. We received a letter from one of our delegation in Congress yesterday morning stating that the agent was already in trouble with the Department, and will not get out soon. Don't pay a cent. We have not space this week, but will say more in our next.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 4, 1879.

It is estimated that there will be 200,000 head of cattle driven from Texas to Kansas this year. The larger part of them are young steers, from one to two years old. They will probably reach the Arkansas valley about the middle of May.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 4, 1879.

[Report from C. M. Scott.]
THE TERRITORY AGAIN.
EDITOR TRAVELER:

I have just completed another little jog into the Territory, and will relate what I saw.

Gen. McNeil was at Ponca Agency on the 22nd, and may go down to Oklahoma to advise the settlers on the North Fork. Troops from Camp Supply and Fort Sill have already been there, and the result was settlers were strung out all along the road on their way back, cursing the country, the soldiers, and above all, the Kansas City Times, and its "pal"Carpenter.

Agent Howarth will not take charge of the Pawnees, but enjoy himself visiting the Agencies all around. A few years wrestling with the ague at Kiowa and Comanche Agency satisfied him that the Territory, generally, is not a healthy location.

About sixty of the Pawnees are out on a buffalo hunt, and forty are visiting the Wichitas.

We cut across the country from Pawnee to Kaw Agency, making the trip in a day's ride. It is a much nearer route to Arkansas City, and fully as good road as by the way of Ponca.

The Osages were counciling, on our arrival, but we did not stop to hear them. They have a great many ponies. Some very fancy; but few for sale.

Gov. Joe's camp is near the mouth of Salt Creek, about five miles from the crossing point of the Arkansas. The Arkansas ford at Salt Creek is a good one, although the water was four feet deep in the channel.

Up Salt Creek we saw millions of the "fourteen year locusts." In the creek beautiful fish could be seen grabbing at flies as they fell on its surface.

Crops on Grouse creek are looking splendid, and everything has the appearance of thrift.

All cattle men, as well as others, will have to leave the Territory within the next sixty days, in compliance with the order from the Interior Department at Washington. So much for the white settlers rushing in and making fools of themselves, and bringing hardships upon stock men.

[NOTICE: RELATIVE TO REPAIRING BRIDGE ACROSS ARKANSAS RIVER.]

Arkansas City Traveler, June 4, 1879.

NOTICE.
To the People of Bolton and Cresswell Townships:

Your officers having refused to pay for the lumber used in repairing your bridge across the Arkansas river, we have purchased lot No. 1, in section No. 1, upon which the South end of your bridge rests, and there never having been any road laid out across said lot No. 1, to your bridge, we have closed up our land at the end of the bridge, and, after next Monday, no person will be allowed to cross said land; and all persons crossing said land will be prosecuted to the full extent of the law, unless the said lumber, and all expenses, shall be fully paid us in the meantime. Respectfully, HACKNEY & McDONALD.

June 3rd, 1879.

[PERSONALS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, June 4, 1879.

C. M. Scott has gone to Topeka.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 4, 1879.

Several arrivals by stage Sunday evening.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 4, 1879.

J. C. McMullen and family were in town last week.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 4, 1879.

Colonel Whiteman of Ponca Agency was in town Monday.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 4, 1879.

BIRTH. Born to Mr. and Mrs. Rothwell, on Friday the 21st, a daughter.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 4, 1879.

Albert R. Green, of the Kansas City Journal, gave us a call Thursday.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 4, 1879.

A detachment of cavalry left camp here Monday morning for Coffeyville.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 4, 1879.

Benedict Bro's. are putting up a new set of Fairbanks Scales in front of their hardware store.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 4, 1879.

Lucius Norton started for St. Louis on Monday, where he intends residing the coming summer.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 4, 1879.

It is reported that several more companies of soldiers are to be sent to this place in a short time.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 4, 1879.

Parties are constantly arriving in town looking for farms and business locations.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 4, 1879.

A large force is at work on Summit Street and Central Avenue, grading according to the survey.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 4, 1879.

Rev. J. S. McClung will preach at the Starry Point Schoolhouse, next Sabbath afternoon, at half-past two o'clock.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 4, 1879.

We are pained to learn that Col. Barrett was stricken Sunday with an attack of epilepsy. He is now convalescent.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 4, 1879.

There has been an interesting combat the past week between the new street sprinkler and the dust. The conflict is not yet decided.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 4, 1879.

An epidemic has broken out among the horses. It is an aggravated form of distemper. Capt. Nipp has lost six and Jacob Keffer four.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 4, 1879.

The enterprising proprietors of the Central Avenue Hotel are still making improvements, having built a new fence around the premises.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 4, 1879.

Charlie Coombs, one of our boys, is at work on the Daily Telegram. Charlie is a good typo and should have a situation in accordance with his merit.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 4, 1879.

Rations are being forwarded from Wichita, and other points, to the troops stationed here, and the probability is that they will remain here for some time.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 4, 1879.

Mr. John Hoenscheidt, of Winfield, has been in town for the past few days locating the grade on several of our streets. He was assisted by Mr. I. H. Bonsall.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 4, 1879.

We have received a communication from the Hon. A. Walton, of the steamer Cherokee, in which he states that wheat is selling for $1.00 per bushel, corn 60 cents, and new potatoes $1.50.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 4, 1879.

Marshall Mott was kept busy last Thursday tying teams that were left standing on the streets. He says someone will be made an example of if it is not stopped. Let offenders beware!

Arkansas City Traveler, June 4, 1879.

A. A. Newman is loading a wagon train for Ft. Sill and Wichita Agency.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 4, 1879.

A permanent grade is being established on Summit and Main streets, Central, Eleventh, and Twelfth avenues. A thing which ought to have been done long before this.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 4, 1879.

The rain on the line of the Santa Fe last Thursday night was very heavy. At Irwin the town was blown away, and fifty people killed or wounded.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 4, 1879.

A team of horses at the Meat Market ran off last Wednesday, that had been left without hitching. They made a slow race, and after passing around a block, were easily captured.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 4, 1879.

A quarry has been opened on Dr. Carlisle's farm that contains as fine curb, and flag stone, as can be found in the State. This is fortunate for our town, as the supply is sufficient for the demands of a large city.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 4, 1879.

As an indication of the increase of business in our city, the Cowley County Bank purchased a single piece of exchange yesterday of the value of twenty thousand five hundred dollars. How is that for one day's work, eh?

Arkansas City Traveler, June 4, 1879.

Baseballists are considerably interested in the formation of a club. At a meeting Saturday the preliminaries were arranged and prospects are favorable to a permanent institution. It is a healthy amusement, and one in which our boys excel.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 4, 1879.

A large number of dwelling houses are in process of erection, and mechanics are all employed, even driven with business. Before another season comes around, at the rate improvements are going on now, Arkansas City will have doubled its population.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 4, 1879.

There will be an informal meeting of the citizens of School District No. 2, on Saturday, June 7th, at 2 o'clock, for the purpose of taking into consideration the hiring of a teacher for the next school year. BY ORDER OF THE BOARD.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 4, 1879.

The contract to grade the Sumner & Cowley R. R. has been let from El Paso to Arkansas City, and General Manager W. B. Strong said to us last Saturday evening that the road would be completed to this place by the first of next November. Hurray for the Iron Horse.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 4, 1879.

Baseball. The Jack Oaks of Creswell and the Winfield nine played a match game of baseball last Tuesday, at Winfield, which resulted in the disastrous defeat of the Winfield nine, the Jack Oak's winning the game by a score of 64 to 7.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 4, 1879.

Judgment was rendered in the criminal cases at the late term of the District Court as follows:

STATE VS. FRANK MANNY: fined $350.

STATE VS. FRANCIS SMALL: sentenced to 5 years in the penitentiary at hard labor.

STATE VS. DAVID CREEK: 4 years in the penitentiary.

STATE VS. HENRY MOUNT: fined $100.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 4, 1879.

A Texan with too much tanglefoot fell into the hands of Marshal Mott last week. The Marshal found it a task to handle with ease, the dead weight of two hundred pounds avoirdupois, and finally called to his aid the muscle of others. The man was taken to the lockup, and the next morning brought before the police court, and his services secured for ten days on the street in default of the needful to pay the fine.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 4, 1879.

A number of emigrantsforty all toldunder the leadership of Colonel Bell, Carpenter's right-hand man, who had settled near Ponca Agency, were removed by a detachment of Colonel Barrett's command. They arrived here Friday evening. Bell, in company with some of the other emigrants, returned to get their stock, permission having been obtained from the commanding officer. Should they, or others who have once been removed, enter the Territory again, with a view of settlement, their wagons and utensils will be burned and their stock confiscated. Most of the emigrants are from Missouri.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 4, 1879.

School closed last Friday with a good year's work done. Mr. Sylvester has given the very best of satisfaction in his management of the school. He has succeeded in doing, what very few teachers are able to, that, of establishing a true and lasting friendship between himself and his pupils; and has won by his gentlemanly conduct and assiduous attention to the duties of his school, a host of friends. We hope to welcome him back again next year.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 4, 1879.

NAMES OF PUPILS, DISTRICT 53, TEACHER: L. E. NORTON.

Maggie Sample, Rose Sample, Annie Coulter, Clara Lorry, George Hunt, Frank Lorry, Frank Bland, Ruth Voris, Fred Lorry, Mamie Schnee, Marion Hunt, Mary Lorry, Clyde Akers.

[REPORT FROM AMOS WALTON RE THE "CHEROKEE" STEAMSHIP.]

Arkansas City Traveler, June 11, 1879. Editorial Page.

FROM THE CHEROKEE.
FORT SMITH, May 29th.
EDITOR TRAVELER:

Supposing a desire on the part of the friends of the Cherokee to hear something in regard to the trip and our experience on the river, I propose to write in brief, until I can give them a more thorough knowledge of the facts developed by our experience.

We left Salt Fork, or Ponca Agency, at which place I joined the crew, on the 26th of April, at half past one o'clock, and landed in the mouth of Poteau at half past five o'clock on the morning of the 19th of May: our actual time, about 21-1/2 days. We laid up whole days, without moving, according to my diary, 8, and detained two days, one upon snags, where we had a good channel but accidentally struck our bow upon one and drifted upon more; and one whole day at the mouth of Verdigris, by missing channelmaking 10 days without running. I estimate, also, three days lost for lack of appliances and some experience in the river, and think now, that if we had the same trip to make again, we could make it in about eight days. Although the river was low, our soundings generally run over two feet. Some of the worst river was for about 15 miles below Bear creek, where it spread out very wide, with numerous channels. I think our worst bar was at the mouth of Cimarron, where the water spread evenly over the whole rivera smooth, solid bar, but sounding two feet. Taken altogether, we are satisfied that the river can be utilized as a means of transportation to our city and our producing community.

As you advance down the river, the timber grows better and extends farther away from the riverthe Cedar begins to make its appearance on the bluffs, and we begin to see some thing that looks like coal formation, cropping out from the banks.

About 12 miles above Childer's ferry, on Old House creek; 3 miles from the river, is a four foot vein of splendid coal. This is on the left bank of the river. Further down, on the right, and just above Childer's ferry, is a vein of the same depth, which has been worked. Either can be worked without any difficulty.

Below this, again, on the farm of Napoleon Moore, we dug, from the bank by the boat, some very fine coal, which we used in the forge and furnace. These first outcroppings our smith called good coal. We have specimens and intend to take a ton or two back with us.

As we go on down, we find the river growing better in the length of the runs without crossingsometimes narrow and deep for six or eight miles, with high banks on either side, and sometimes breaking away from the river in a gently ascending slope covered with grass and thinly scattered oaks. The scenery alone is worth the trouble and hardships incident to a trip down the river.

We have been kindly received and well treated by the people of Fort Smith, and part of them are fully alive to the importance of working up a river trade, while some seem to have grown rich here and feel that the country is far enough advanced for all their purposes. The town is a small one in population, considering the amount of territory covered. Many of the premises take in two acres of ground, and you can walk around among these country homes for hours, finding splendid old oaks for shade treescedars, flowers, and blue grass for adornment. When you first see the town, you see only the main street, and expect a town of about 1500 inhabitants, but after you have traveled for hours around in the suburbs you conclude they have what they claim, about 6,000. They have four newspapersthree Democratic and one Republican; seven churches; one fine furniture and chair factory, splendidly furnished with machinery, and anxious to work up a trade with us. They have a great many business houses and no specialties; they keep everything under the same roof that people want or call for. Their busy time is after cotton picking commences.

We sold the wheat to Dr. Wall, who has a very fine mill about one mile out of town with all the latest improvements and capable of grinding 300 bushels a day.

I have been treated very kindly by the gentlemen of the press here, who are, as they always are, everywhere, keenly alive to the importance of opening trade with our country, and they promise hearty cooperation with us in our attempts to improve and navigate the river.

There have been two courts in session hereState and United Statesand I have had a chance to see that summary dispensation of justice we read of in the U. S. Courts. I have seen a jury take only three-quarters of an hour to condemn a man to death, that I, although hearing all the evidence, arguments of counsel, and charge of the Judge, would not have condemned at allonly a slight difference of opinion; one calls it justice, another says it is judicial murder.

To conclude, I have written this hasty letter to give you some idea, for the present, of what we have seen and done. I will say in regard to pine lumber, wagon stuff, furniture in the rough, coal or fuel of other kinds, we can make an exchange that would be of almost incalculable benefit to our country, and there is a market along the river for all our wheat, corn, and potatoes; and I am now satisfied that they can be successfully transported by the river.

I start up the river tomorrow. Yours, A. W.

["PLAIN TALK" RE LUMBER ACTION TAKEN ON ARKANSAS BRIDGE.]

Arkansas City Traveler, June 11, 1879.

Quaker Thoughts.
Editor Traveler:

I notice that the action that was brought against Creswell Township by the Attorney for the Chicago lumber company to recover the value of the pine lumber in the Arkansas Bridge has been abruptly dismissed.

The status of this Chicago claim seems to be of some interest to others besides Creswell Township. It appears that at the time the bridge was erected, Creswell Township was too deeply involved to vote bonds to build bridges so a subscription for this purpose was raised, and the work went on. But after awhile difficulties arose in collecting the monies subscribed, and those who had paid in, began to foresee that unless something was done to help the cause along, they would soon be left without money or bridge. What to do, in this dilemma, was the question. Finally, those who had managed to drag the township into debt, far beyond any authority of law, concluded they would hit it another slap and fix the balance of the needful upon the township! They were not long in persuading the Township trustee to look through his glasses at the subject, and although admonished at the time by the trustee of Bolton, that he was exceeding his authority, he promptly placed his official signature to a contract to bind, if possible, the township of Creswell to pay for the lumber!

Lawyers, who have no interest in the question, place the responsibility of the debt upon the trustee. Mr. Hackney, himself, stated in the hotel in this town that he would bring an action against the former trustee for the value of the lumber; but he was satisfied the defendant would shove his property into the hands of his wife and beat the plaintiff out of his judgment. Now, Mr. Editor, with these events passing before our eyes, is it justice, is it fairness, is it decency to undertake to shove this debt upon the people of Creswell? I answer No. Not so long as law can arrest it. Place the responsibility where it belongsupon him who created it. PLAIN TALK.

[REPORT FROM "CHRISTMAS" - SPRING CREEK TOWNSHIP.]

Arkansas City Traveler, June 11, 1879.

SPRING CREEK TOWNSHIP.
[From Special Correspondent.]
MR. EDITOR: I took a flying trip through this township some days ago, and was very much pleased with what I observed. Geographically, this township is centrally located east and west, and is one of the southern tier of townships, bordering on the Indian Territory, bounded on the north by Dexter Township, east by Cedar, and west by Silverdale. It is nine miles north and south and six miles east and west. It is also well watered by such streams as the Grouse, Little Beaver, Spring, Crab, and Skull creeks; well adapted to stock raising and farming.

I made my first appearance in this township near the junction of Skull creek with Little Beaver, in the southwest corner. Mr. Eaton and A. A. Wiley have fine farms at this point, and are engaged in the stock business largely, as well as all the farmers along the State line. It rather excited my curiosity to know how Skull creek received its name, and by inquiring I was soon satisfied.

Skull Creek was named by Mr. Alexander Tolles, he being the first to settle on the creek, taking this claim in 1870. One day while traveling across the creek bottom, he observed a skull, supposed to be the skull of an Indian, thereby the name came; what became of the skull I know not, but Tolles still lives here.

Mr. H. L. Libby has a farm on this stream. He is engaged largely in the stock business and is building a fine, large stone house this summer. He boasts of being a strong Greenbacker, and is one of the leading lights of the township.

Spring creek is in the southeast corner of the township, running south. There are many farmers here making good improvements, and many more coming in. Jr. J. R. Tobin has his farm on this creek, and is making many improvements. He is the senior partner of the firm of Tobin & Davis, of Maple City, builders and contractors.

Maple City is the post village of this township, and is a thriving little place. It is situated on the headwaters of Skull Creek, 4-1/2 miles north of State line. It is 16 miles east of Arkansas City. It is built on a rise in the prairie, in a good farming community. It contains a good store well filled with a general assortment of goods of all kinds. Mr. J. B. Schofield attends on all occasions, and solicits the patronage of the farming community. There is also a hotel, blacksmith shop, paint shop, and carpenter shop. Dr. N. M. Schofield is the physician of this place, and is also postmaster.

Grouse Creek runs through a small corner of this township in the northwest. Here we found Mr. J. N. Clayton hoeing corn among the stumps. This is the only Grouse Creek farm in the township. CHRISTMAS.

[PERSONALS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, June 11, 1879.

Nights cook, days warm.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 11, 1879.

Bring in your vegetables.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 11, 1879.

Keep that Street Sprinkler in motion.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 11, 1879.

We sold the Stage Co. the boss team of the line.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 11, 1879.

BIRTH. Born June 5th, to Geo. McIntire and wife, a son.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 11, 1879.

Judge Christian, and daughter, take in Wichita this week.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 11, 1879.

Hon. C. R. Mitchell was confined to his bed with sickness last week.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 11, 1879.

The City Hotel is to be repaired and rented to a first-class landlord.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 11, 1879.

The raid into the Indian Territory has blown out with the South wind.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 11, 1879.

Four families from Illinois arrived last Saturday to settle in this city.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 11, 1879.

The steamer "Cherokee" is on her winding way up the majestic Arkansas.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 11, 1879.

A large number of new houses are in course of erection in this city.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 11, 1879.

Frank Schiffbauer, and wife, went down to the Pawnee Agency last week.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 11, 1879.

Charles Parker is commencing to erect a large Stone Shop on Summit Street.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 11, 1879.

Mr. Bohle, flour inspector, is here inspecting the flour on A. A. Newman's contract.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 11, 1879.

DIED. A child of Mr. Johnson's, residing on the Coomb's farm, died last Wednesday night.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 11, 1879.

Henry Pruden and wife, together with J. J. Breene, left last Thursday for Dayton, Ohio.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 11, 1879.

John Stafford, of Winfield, has purchased an interest in the meat market, and will locate in this city.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 11, 1879.

Mr. Matlack has sold his large supply of wheat that he purchased of the farmers to A. A. Newman.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 11, 1879.

As war weather approaches, great apprehension is felt through the South of the probable event of yellow fever again.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 11, 1879.

A new firm from Winfield will open a stock of clothing in the building formerly occupied by the Cowley County Bank.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 11, 1879.

Still they come. Another Winfield man has opened a saloon on Summit St. Roll in boys. Now is the time to settle at the terminus.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 11, 1879.

Read the ad. of L. Lippmann in this number. Those in want of native lumber or frame timber will find at the yard in this city an ample supply.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 11, 1879.

Within the next thirty days we will publish the TRAVELER entirely at home. We have ordered new type and will soon appear with a bright new face.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 11, 1879.

Another Winfield mana tailor this timehas located in the shop with Joseph Schuster. Bring along your cloth and he will cut according to measure.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 11, 1879.

Some of the small fry started a slop stand at the right of the door of Patterson's saloon last Friday and dished up the cheap and nasty, pretty lively for awhile.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 11, 1879.

Rev. McClung is to remain with the First Presbyterian Church until next spring. Mr. McClung has filled the pulpit of this church for the past year, and has the happy faculty of making hosts of friends.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 11, 1879.

WANTED.
Twenty colored women, who know how to wash and iron and do general house work, can find employment in this city. Leavenworth and Topeka papers please notice.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 11, 1879.

A contractor was in town on Friday, looking over the R. R. survey, with a view of bidding on the work.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 11, 1879.

Lieutenant Cushman and a detachment of ten men arrived here from Coffeyville on Sunday last.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 11, 1879.

Schiffbauer Bro's. have built the largest corn crib in the valley, are paying the highest market price for corn.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 11, 1879.

We are informed that Charley Hollaway is now a partner of Dr. Loomis, and will mix at the old stand as usual.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 11, 1879.

We notice in the Kansas City Journal that the order for the removal of the cattle from the unassigned lands in the Indian Territory has been revoked.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 11, 1879.

The Sumner County Vidette will please bear in mind when reference is made to the far famed Medicinal Springs, at Salt City, owned by Hackney & McDonald, that their locality is in Cowley County.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 11, 1879.

Mr. Sylvester left for his home in Wisconsin last Monday morning. As this is the annual vacation of the public school, he expects to remain away about ten weeks, and then return with fresh vigor to commence his task anew.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 11, 1879.

We had the pleasure of meeting Lieutenants Leeper and Smith of the 4th cavalry last Friday. They are ordered by General Pope to report to the commanding officer at Camp Supply to combat any outbreak on the part of the Cheyennes.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 11, 1879.

Co. I, 4th Cavalry, passed through our city on Friday last. Capt. Himple is the commanding officer of this company. As the men were all mounted on grey horses, their appearance was quite attractive. This company was on the way to Camp Supply, via Ft. Reno.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 11, 1879.

Prof. W. D. Mowry has withdrawn from the employ of Dr. Loomis. He has been a drug clerk in this town for several years, and has made a host of friends. We are informed that he contemplates a visit to the mountains. We bespeak for him the kind consideration of those he may meet.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 11, 1879.

The L. L. & G. R. R. propose to build directly west from Wellington, into Harper County. This will leave New Caldwell to lay in the shade till the morning of the Great Resurrection. Good bye, sweet child, thou hast given up the spirit ere the morning of life tasted the sweets of this beautiful world.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 11, 1879.

Why doesn't someone burn a kiln of brick? Our town is starting to boom, and there is not a brick on the market. This would be a good investment for some man of small capital and a little energy. Brick we must have, and if there is not got up here, at present, to manufacture the article, others will come and reap the advantage. There is money in this, and immediate steps should be taken to supply the demands of those who will require brick to build.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 11, 1879.

Native Lumber at Parker & Canfield's, back of Benedict's. All bills can be filled promptly from Lippmann's mill, by leaving orders with Parker & Canfield. Soft lumber, $2.25; hard lumber and walnut, $2.75. Township bills filled, for bridges and culverts, and orders taken in payment.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 11, 1879.

NOTICE. Left my bed and board, Without any just cause, my wife Sarah. This is to notify all persons not to trust her on my account for I will not pay it. June 9th, 1879.

C. W. DRENNAN.
Arkansas City Traveler, June 11, 1879.

NOTICE. Taken up by the undersigned at Arkansas City, one hog. The owner can have the same by proving property and paying charges, June 9th, 1879. L. C. NORTON.

[EDITORIAL PAGE.]

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, June 18, 1879.

The railroad war between the Santa Fe and the Rio Grande R. R. has been brought into Federal Court and the Santa Fe Company is getting away with the baggage. This is just as we expected.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

The war between the railroads on passenger rates, running East, has reduced the fare from Kansas City to Chicago to fifty cents, and from Kansas City to St. Louis to one dollar and fifty cents, with a chromo thrown in.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

[Report by Editor Nathan Hughes on Visit to Territory.]
On Saturday last, we started, in company with Joseph Sherburne, Esq., on a short trip into the Indian Territory. We crossed the State line at Young's Ranche, and bearing southwest reached the mouth of Bitter creek about noon. Crossing the Chikaskia just below this point, we continued our drive in the same direction, and soon found that the trail we were traveling led to the late camp of James Bell and party.

It appears that Bell took a claim on the west side of the Chikaskia, and turned a few furrows of sod under the apprehension that, as a Cherokee, he could not be removed from the soil. But one morning, not long ago, an order came from Headquarters directing the military to remove Jimmy and his party, and a notice to that effect persuaded them that it was the better part of discretion to get up and dust.

They came into Arkansas City one hot day and cooled their fevered brow in the shade of a limb of the law. In the meantime, the Cherokee authorities at Tah-le-quah have sent a protest to Washington against Bell or other Cherokees settling on lands in the Territory west of 96 degrees of longitude, claiming that the treaty gives the General Government the sovereign right to take these lands on the OutletSixty miles in width, through to the Pan Handlefor the use of other tribes, and wishing to act in good faith, they desire to keep them free from any encroachment on the part of their people.

If the President and the army of the United States are not all brought up into the august presence of some Kansas justice for disturbing the peace of this party, we presume the question will soon be settled.

From this camp we drove across the prairie, traveling several miles between the Chikaskia and Salt Fork. About 2 o'clock p.m. we espied an ambulance at the junction of the rivers, and driving into the timber, we met Chief Joseph and his band of Nez Perces, just crossing the Chikaskia, from the east side, to take a rest on their new Reservation. As each wagon arrived at the west bank of the river, Chief Joseph fastened a rope to the pole, and with the aid of his men, assisted the teams in pulling the leads up the hill.

The first white man we met on the ground was C. M. Scott, who had volunteered to guide the tribe to their new Reservation. Crossing the river, we met on the east side Special Agent Hayworth, also Agent Whiteman, of the Ponca Agency, who will take charge of the Nez Perces. After resting about two hours we were invited by Col. Whiteman to a seat in his ambulance, and in ten miles drive were at the Ponca Agency. Here we enjoyed the hospitality of the Colonel and his accomplished wife, for which we are greatly indebted.

We found things at the Ponca Agency in a flourishing condition. The buildings already completed are neat and substantial, while the four new cottages in course of construction will add much to the comfort of the employees. The Poncas are hard at work, building houses and making homes, and on every side we saw evidence of prosperity. On the north of the Agency a field of over one hundred acres is planted to corn, and many small fields can be seen on the Reservation.

We think that the restless spirit of the Poncas can be justly attributed to the influence of whites at their old Reservation in the North. Certainly no tribe of Indians in the Territory has a more attractive agency, and no Reservation a finer body of land.

Under the supervision of Col. Whiteman, this tribe is gaining in livestock, the habits of industry are taught, and if undisturbed, in a short time will be an independent people. Sherburne & Houghton, the traders at the Ponca, are doing a good business, and with the addition of the Nez Perces, trade will be increased considerably. The loss of the interpreter at Atchison ten days ago is seriously felt by Col. Whiteman and the Indians. We met a number of employees at the agency, several who are residents of this town. On Sunday morning we started on our return, and with the cooling influence of a northwest breeze, our trip was a pleasant one.

[LETTER TO EDITOR FROM P. PEARSON.]

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

ARKANSAS CITY, June 16, 1879.
Editor Traveler: Allow me a few words to say that you was misinformed in regard to the Davis Family being charged double hall rent. I charged John Davis my regular rate $5.00, but not knowing exactly what he wanted to do he left, and as far as the colored troupe concern, I will just say thisthat I believe they have just as much right as any body elseand by the way they paid the hall rent ($5.00) without grumbling. They live at our county seat, and have organized a brass band, hence they gave entertainments in order to raise money to buy their instruments. If we are Republicans, let us be Republicans all over.

P. PEARSON.
We fail to see what Peter's hall or the colored band has to do with the Republican party.

EDITOR.
[REPORT FROM "SQUIB" - SOUTH BEND.]

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

Editor Traveler: Not seeing anything from this part of the moral vineyard for some time, I thought I would jot down a few items. South Bend has at last wakened from her long sleep, and now begins to mean business. A saw mill has arrived, and the sound of the whistle will soon be heard in that hitherto quiet part of the valley. The mill came from two miles north of Douglas, in Butler County, and is owned by J. Cook & Co. Wheat has been harvested in this part, and all in the stack. Corn is in tassel, and the farmers are happy. There are to be five new houses built this fall in the Bend. The Keck Brothers have built an addition to their new house on the Cook farm. SQUIB.

[FOURTH OF JULY GRAND CELEBRATION, 1879!]

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

GRAND CELEBRATION 4TH OF JULY, 1879!
Arkansas City, Cowley County, Ks.
The Citizens of Arkansas City have made arrangements to give the people of Southern Kansas a grand entertainment at a grove on the banks of the Walnut near town, with the following attractions.

---
The Programme for the day will be opened at 10 o'clock a.m., by music from the

Arkansas City Silver Cornet Band,
To be followed by an Oration and Public Speaking. BISHOP SIMPSON and CHAPLIN McCABE are expected to address the crowd.

INDIAN WAR DANCE.
The Committee have made an arrangement with a band of PONCA Indians from the Territory to give a War Dance, Scalp Dance, and other Indian amusements.

DRILL OF U. S. SOLDIERS.
Lieutenant Cushman, now stationed here, will Drill his Company of U. S. Regulars.

---
Various amusements will be provided for the pleasure of the crowd, to be used as required, as follows: Croquet, Foot Ball, Base Ball, Skiffs, Blind Fold Wheel Barrow Race, etc.

---
$5.00 will be placed on the top of a Greasy Pole, for anyone that can take it. A purse of $55.00 for the winner of a Sack Race.

---
RACES!
AT 3 O'CLOCK P.M. A purse of $50.00 will be paid for a one-fourth mile Running Race, as follows: 1st horse gets $30.00, 2nd $15.00, and 3rd $5.00. 10 per cent entrance fee will be charged to enter horses at this race. Open to all.

---
$5.00 purse will be given to the fastest trotting mule one-fourth mile race. Open to all.

$5.00 purse for the slowest mule one-fourth mile race. In charge of strange drivers. Open to all.

$5.00 purse for winners of a foot race of 100 yards, as follows: $3.00 for 1st and $2.00 for 2nd best.

$5.00 for fat man's race 100 yards. Open to all men weighing 200 or over. First man out gets the money.

---
Steamboat Excursion.
We are expecting the Steamer Cherokee from below, and if the river is in good beating stage, will give Excursions down the river through the day, with accommodations for everybody.

---
FIRE WORKS!
In the evening will be given the grandest display of Fire Works ever attempted in Southern Kansas.

The Celebration will conclude with a Social Dance, where every arrangement for the comfort and pleasure of the public will be made.

[ADS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

THE 4TH OF JULY
Will be Celebrated in great style at Arkansas City, Kansas.
HERMANN GODEHARD
Has received a full assortment of
FOURTH OF JULY GOODS,
Fire Crackers, Roman Candles,
SKY ROCKETS, TOY PISTOLS, FLAGS,
Cannon Fire Crackers,
Chinese Lanterns and an endless Variety of Candies.
Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

DRUGS! DRUGS! DRUGS!
At the Central Drug Store.
We have just received a large fresh supply of
MEDICINES, CHEMICALS, PAINTS, OILS, VARNISHES,
PATENT MEDICINES
-ALSO A FULL LINE OF-
Glass, Putty, Tobacco and Cigars,
PURE WINES AND LIQUORS,
In fact every article usually kept in a first-class Drug Store will be found at

J. T. Shepard's Central Store.
Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

NO MORE
CUSTOM GRINDING
AT NEWMAN'S MILL,
Until Further Notice.
June 11th, 1879.
Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

NEW FURNITURE STORE IN PEARSON'S BUILDING, SUMMIT STREET,
Arkansas City, Kans.
ALL KINDS OF GOODS:

PARLOR, CHAMBER, OFFICE, AND KITCHEN FURNITURE Of all Descriptions.

PICTURE FRAMES MADE TO ORDER.
All orders neatly executed by a PRACTICAL CABINET MAKER. Satisfaction guaranteed. Call and see my stock and examine prices. Latest style of Children's Carriages. Coffins always on hand or made to order. P. PEARSON

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

CURNS & MANSER, LAND AND LOAN AGENTS,
WINFIELD, KANSAS.
[W. CURNS, NOTARY PUBLIC / G. S. MANSER, NOTARY PUBLIC.]
Money Loaned on Long Time at
8, 9 or 10 Per Cent Interest.
Have a complete set of Abstract Books for Cowley County and the City of Winfield.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

ARKANSAS CITY HOUSE,
ARKANSAS CITY, KAS.
M. N. SINNOTT, PROPRIETOR.
ONE DOLLAR PER DAY.

This house has been renovated throughout, and has good stabling connected with it. Stage arrives and departs daily. Special accommodations to commercial men.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

Dr. Alexander's OFFICE: N. SUMMIT ST., ARKANSAS CITY, KANSAS.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

CITY RESTAURANT,
C. S. MAVIS, Proprietor.
BOARDING BY DAY OR WEEK.
Meals at all hours. Single meal, 25 cents. Call and see me.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

MANTOR & BLAKENEY, DEALERS IN STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES,
STONEWARE, FLOUR, FEED AND PROVISIONS.
Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

Dr. Van Doren, DENTIST. Office and residence in the Page building, upstairs. WINFIELD, KANSAS.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

LUMBER,
E. R. THOMPSON,
-DEALER IN ALL KINDS OF PINE LUMBER, DOORS AND SASH.-
Call and see me and get prices before buying elsewhere. Also Contractor & Builder.

Yard and Shop near my Residence in
ARKANSAS CITY, KANSAS.
Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

D. GRANT
-Has just opened in-
SCHIFFBAUER'S BLOCK,
Adjoining the Post Office, a Large Stock
-OF STATIONERY, Together with GLASS AND QUEENSWARE.-
Also a full assortment of LEGAL BLANKS, All of which will be sold cheaper than
Ever Before for Cash. Call and see me.

ARKANSAS CITY, KANSAS.
Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

CITY LIVERY, FEED AND SALE STABLE.
West Central Avenue, ARKANSAS CITY, KANSAS.
STANTON BROS., Proprietors.
GOOD RIGS, GENTLE TEAMS, AND CAREFUL DRIVERS.
Horses Boarded by Day or Week.
Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

CHAS. PARKER, MASTER MECHANIC.
WAGONS BUILT AND REPAIRED.
Also all kinds of Farm Machinery put into the best order.
A GOOD HORSE SHOER On hand at all times.
Shop, on the South Side, near the head of Summit Street.
Give me a call if you want good work at fair prices.
Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

Dr. B. MAYO, M. D., Physician, Surgeon & Accoucheur.
Office in the old Printing Room, Summit Street, Arkansas City, Kansas.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

PAT'S SALOON, NORTH SIDE OF SUMMIT STREET.
CHOICE LIQUORS, COOL DRINKS.
And prompt attention for the public. Also a number-one billiard table for the use of customers. Call and see me.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

If you want to see a nice yard walk, go and see Berger's. If you want the material for one, go to Mr. Wilson's 1-1/2 mile north of town, and if you want the work done in good style, call on the Pennsylvania stone cutter, W. L. KREBS.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

Trot in your Old Corn to Schiffbauer Bros. if you want to get rid of it this year.

Don't leave all your wealth for descendants to quarrel over, but spend some for Choice Groceries at Schiffbauer Bros.

BRING IN YOUR CORN. We want 1,500 bushels of corn, for which we will pay MORE THAN ANY ONE ELSE IN THE CITY, either in cash or in trade. Yours respectfully,

SCHIFFBAUER BROS.
Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

GO TO EDDY'S DRUG STORE FOR MACHINE OILS, ALL KINDS.
PURE WINTER STRAINED LARD OIL. CASTOR OIL.
A NUMBER ONE Good Article of Lubricating Oil.
WHALE OIL, Golden Oil, and WINTER STRAINED TALLOW OIL.
I have a large supply of Machine Oils on hand, and am selling them low. Call and examine the oils and get price before buying your Oil,

-AT EDDY'S DRUG STORE.-
Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

GREEN FRONT DRUG STORE.
DRUGS AND MEDICINES, CHEMICALS, PAINTS, OILS, VARNISHES, GLASS, PUTTY, DYE STUFFS, PERFUMERY, SPONGES, BRUSHES, SOAPS, FANCY & TOILET ARTICLES, PATENT MEDICINES. SCHOOL BOOKS A SPECIALTY. PRESCRIPTIONS Carefully compounded at all Hours. Drugs selected with care.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

NEW DRY GOODS, NEW BOOTS AND SHOES,
NEW GROCERIES.
A fine assortment of goods in all departments.
S. MATLACK
Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

E. S. TORRANCE, Attorney at Law,
WINFIELD, KANSAS.
Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

SPEERS & MANTOR,
[FRANK SPEERS / THOS. MANTOR]
DEALERS IN GROCERIES, WOODENWARE, GLASSWARE, HATS, CAPS,
BOOTS, SHOES, CLOTHING, GENT'S FURNISHING GOODS.
Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

CITY BOOT & SHOE STORE.
I desire to call attention to the Assortment of BOOTS AND SHOES, That I have in stock at present, which I propose to sell as to small a profit that the people MUST BUY! I ALSO MANUFACTURE BOOTS AND SHOES, And keep constantly on hand a large Stock of the best Leather, and GUARANTEE GOOD WORK and satisfactory prices. Fashionable and durable work assured in all cases. REPAIRING NEATLY DONE. Call and see me and be convinced. AL. HORN.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

NEW TONSORIAL ROOMS
(ONE DOOR NORTH OF GREEN FRONT)
ARKANSAS CITY, KAN.
R. SNOW, PROPRIETOR.
10 Cents a Shave or three for 25 cents. Call and see me.
Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

L. H. HOPE, JEWELER, WINFIELD, KANSAS,
Next to Jackson's Restaurant.
Clocks, Watches, Jewelry, Solid Silver and Plated Ware.
Largest stock outside of Kansas City or Leavenworth. Repairing a specialty. All work warranted. Engraving and stencil cutting tools sold at Kansas City prices.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

JOSEPH SCHUSTER,
Manufacturer of Boots & Shoes
Arkansas City, Kansas.
REPAIRING DONE ON SHORT NOTICE. Give me a call. The old Jim Mitchell building, on the corner.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

DAVID MERICLE,
ARKANSAS CITY, KANSAS.
ICE CREAM, LEMONADE, AND CONFECTIONERY.
MEALS AT ALL HOURS. GIVE ME A CALL. BOWEN BUILDING.
D. MERICLE.
Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

THE OLD RELIABLE RESTAURANT,
Wm. GIBBY, Proprietor.
Square meals at all hours at 25 cents.
BOARD AND LODGING $1 PER DAY
SECOND DOOR SOUTH OF OLD CITY HOTEL.
Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

9 AND 10 PER CENT MONEY TO LOAN BY
GILBERT & JARVIS, WINFIELD, KANSAS.
Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

GROCERIES, FLOUR, BOOTS AND SHOES.
L. McLAUGHLIN
Is Constantly Receiving the Finest Goods in the Market, in his line. No Establishment can UNDERSELL Him on Like Quality of Goods. But let it be DISTINCTLY UNDERSTOOD that he does not Deceive Customers By Selling them Cheap and Adulterated Goods. No Adulterated TEAS, COFFEE, SPICES, SUGAR or MOLASSES Found in His store.

EAST SIDE OF SUMMIT STREET
ARKANSAS CITY, KANSAS.
NOTE: MOST OF THE ADS THAT APPEARED IN THE EDITION WERE GIVEN

BUT THERE WERE OTHERS ALSO THAT I SKIPPED. MANY ADS WERE

GIVEN LIKE "PERSONALS" SUCH AS THE FOLLOWING...

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

MONEY TO LOAN For three and five years on first-class improved real estate, at 10 per cent, and small commission. HUEY & MITCHELL.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

Beautiful Calicoes, Handsome Dress Goods, Summer Shawls, Neck Ties, Torchon and Bretouni Laces, Summer Skirts, Gloves, etc., at WILSON'S CENTRAL STORE.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

A good clean Shave for ten cents at SNOW'S TONSORIAL ROOMS.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

FOR SALE. 80 acres of good land on State line convenient to timber and water, forty acres in good cultivation. Price $350 one half cash balance on time. To be sold in sixty days, if sold at all. CHANNELL & McLAUGHLIN.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

Holman's Liver Pad at EDDY'S DRUG STORE.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

FOR SALE. The best pair of mares in Cresswell township. Also, a light harness. Terms Cash. Inquire at this office.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

MRS. O. F. GODFREY is now prepared to do fashionable dressmaking at prices to suit the times, cutting and fitting a specialty. Residence, east side, formerly the Hughes place.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

500,000 Sweet Potato plants at Eddy's. C. M. SWARTS.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

Good Dried Apples, 5c. per pound. S. MATLACK.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

French Mustard prepared by the quart. Hermann Godehard has it.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

Wanted. Everybody to know that Hermann Godehard has opened his Ice Cream Parlor, "and don't you forget it."

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

Charter Oak and other StovesMore of them, and cheaper than ever before sold in Cowley County, at C. R. SIPES.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

MAX SCHRETZLER, TAILOR.
Will make, Mend, or Cut Men's Wear in the most modern and approved styles. Shop in the Mitchell building, on Summit Street.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

Don't fail to call and see O. P.'s new Dress Goods for summer and get prices before making your purchase.

WE HAVE JUST OPENED a complete line seasonable Dry Goods, Ladies', Misses' and Child's shoes, which will be sold at "very close margin." O. P. HOUGHTON

[PERSONALS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

The Drs. met at Winfield, to quiz, last Monday.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

Dr. Cormac, who once resided here for a few months, was in the city last week.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

H. O. Meigs, formerly of Arkansas City, is Deputy County Clerk in Harper County.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

The R. R. surveyors are locating the permanent survey between this City and Winfield.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

Mr. T. K. Finley and Mr. Holmes, of Emporia, were in town last week, looking after their interests.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

Our old neighbor, Max Fawcett, has a lengthy article in the Kansas Monthly on the resources of Florida.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

A tornado passed through the country south of Augusta on the 8th inst., destroying crops and killing several people.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

Mr. Tom Berry, and King, were up from the Pawnee Agency last week. They report everything quiet in that locality.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

Capt. Norton, who formerly resided at this place, writes from Florida that he has oranges on trees planted by his own hand.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

DIED. At the residence of I. Swickard in Creswell Township, June 16th, 1879, John Pruett, aged sixty-five years and five months.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

The Ladies of the United Presbyterian Society will give a blackberry festival early in the season. Further notice will be given.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

Miss Lockley left last Monday to visit her old home at Salt Lake. Joe sings "I want to be a Mormon in the New Jerusalem."

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

Pat has matched his horse, John Bascom, against Brown Dick, owned by Beach, of Wichita, at one hundred dollars a side, to run at Winfield on Saturday next.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

Read the new card of William Gibby's in this number. His house will be found just what is claimed for it and those who call, don't forget to come again.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

The traveling public will find teams fed and cared for in good order, by calling at Stanton's Livery Stable. Read their card in the TRAVELER and give them a trial.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

Charles Parker's card appears in this number of the TRAVELER. He is building a large Stone Shop where first class workmen are on hand to serve the wants of the public.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

Pat's card appears in this number. The public have pronounced in favor of a saloon, and those in need of something for the stomach's sake will find just what they are hunting at Pat's.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

Mr. Cryler, of Quincy, Illinois, has leased the old City Hotel of Henry Tisdale, and will take possession after the building has been thoroughly repaired and put in order for a first- class house.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

The committee appointed by the District Court to condemn the right of way through Cowley County, for the Cowley, Sumner and Fort Smith R. R., will commence work this week between Arkansas City and Winfield.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

A stalk of corn, of sixty days growth, measuring six feet in height, was brought into the TRAVELER office last Monday. This corn grew on sandy land but a few rods from the residence of M. R. Leonard. This is an average growth of one and one-fifth inches per day.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

Special U. S. Indian Agent Hayworth gave us a call on Friday last. He had in charge Chief Joseph's band, on their way to their new reservation at the mouth of the Chikaskia. Mr. Hayworth is an accomplished gentleman, and has done good service for the department. C. M. Scott volunteered as guide to the new reservation. The Nez Perces will be attached to the Ponca Agency, and this will somewhat increase the duties of Agent Whiteman.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

The races at this place on Thursday afternoon were very exciting. The east side carried off the purse in an easy manner. The Capron pony ran square and handsome, and led the race. The last heat was run by the Crawford "hoss" against the Rexford Canuck. On the last quarter the Canuck stumbledowing to corns in his feet, the jockies sayand lost the race. The old Government stallion, with an "I C" on his shoulder, ran like Ridenour's regulator, a leetle too slow. The Farrar pony came out groomed to a gloss, and ran through the track much to the admiration of the ladies.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

Mr. Frank Schiffbauer returned from the Pawnee Agency last week and he states that the report through the country to the effect that the Pawnees had joined the Cheyennes to go north is without foundation. Everything is quiet down there and the Pawnees are at home. The effort that is being made, on the part of shysters, to get up an Indian scare is too thin to alarm an old woman. "Let us have peace."

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

MENTION IS MADE OF HAIL STORM IN WICHITA...BREAKING GLASS IN MANY OF THE BUILDINGS. ALSO MENTION OF A TORNADO THAT STRUCK THE TOWN OF IRVING, BLOWING AWAY A FEW BUILDINGS.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

Mr. Schretzler, the tailor, who has located in the Mitchell building, has a card in this paper. We believe he is a good workman and his physical infirmities are such, that all who are in need of tailors work, should give him their patronage. Remember the unfortunate and help the man along.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

Capt. Walton, of the steamer Cherokee, hove into this port of entry last Monday morning. He reports leaving the boat at Ft. Gibson on the 10th, and gives it as his opinion that she will reach here in a few days. The steamer has on board pine lumber, shingles, and wagon stuff.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

Dr. M. E. Munger, of Manchester, Michigan, and Chas. Herran, Esq., of Bloomington, Illinois, gave us a pleasant call on Friday last. They expressed themselves as well pleased with Kansas, and especially with our town and surrounding country. Sensible men. Come again.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

Mr. Weil, of Kansas City, was in town last week. This gentleman is the publisher of a German paperThe Herald of the Westand we are told, by those who read the language, that it contains a very fair description of Cowley County.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

We wish to correct the statement that appeared in the TRAVELER in a late number, during our absence, to the effect that Capt. Nipp's herd of horses were in a diseased condition. We are informed that they are sound and healthy, and are for sale cheap for cash.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

After long confinement to the house from ill health, Dr. Loomis is to be seen at his place of business again. The Dr. is one of our best citizens and those who deal with him will find him an affable gentleman and straight as a gun.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

The Ethiopians of Beaver Township gave a concert at Victoria School House last Saturday evening.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

We notice a new pair of platform scales in use before the store of Benedict Bros.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

Gen. McNeil is at the Pawnee Agency.

[EDITORIAL PAGE.]

Arkansas City Traveler, June 25, 1879.

The junction of the Wichita, Arkansas City, and Wellington railroad has been located on the east side of the river in Gore Township, Sumner County, about nineteen miles south of Wichita and about twenty-five miles from Arkansas City. Geo. Litzenberg (Farmer Doolittle), has christened the place "Mulvane City." We understand a town is to be laid out, the shadows of whose steeples and the racket of whose business marts will make all contig uous points sick.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 25, 1879.

Mr. Ryan's "House Bill" for the relief of settlers on the Osage lands has passed that body. The bill provides for a period of five months in which to make one fourth payment and the remainder in three annual installments without interest. It also gives to persons who hereafter purchase these lands, the right to pay one fourth of the purchase money at the time of entry, and the balance in three annual installments without interest. Will the Senate pass the bill?

[EDITORIAL PAGE: WINFIELD ATTACKS WICHITA.]

Arkansas City Traveler, June 25, 1879.

A Doomed City.
The businessmen of Wichita are beginning to feel uneasy. The crops in many places in Sedgwick County are a total failure, and the crops in Cowley and Sumner counties, which in reality have made Wichita what she is today, will be transferred this year over their own line of roads, thus sapping that city of her heart's best blood.

We cannot feel very much sympathy for Wichita in her downfall, because she has always done what she could to hurt and keep away emigration from towns situated south of her. While it is right and proper for her citizens to resort to honorable means to obtain and hold emigration, it is not right for them to lie about and traduce their rival towns.

The citizens of that burg have spent a great deal of force in trying to ruin Winfield, now those who will be left with the bag to hold will spend more force trying to keep enormous taxation paid up. Wichita is a doomed city, and great will be the fall thereof.

We clip the above from the Winfield Semi-Weekly. Why should Winfield criticize Wichita? Has Wichita done worse than its Winfield neighbor? "First remove the beam from thine own eye, and then thou canst see clearly to remove the mote in thy brother's eye." When, within the memory of man, has Winfield let a chance escape to snap, with all the venom of a snake, at Arkansas City? She howls at Wichita for treating her with injustice while she is ever ready to practice the same treatment toward us.

Talk to the stranger who comes in our midst, and about the first thing he says is, "Why they told me up in Winfield that nobody lived down here, and that you are to have no railroad, as it will not be extended from their town until the right of way can be secured through the Territory." He looks around, and the first thing he discovers is the lie that was told him at Winfield. On every side he sees evidence of prosperity, and where he was told he would see a little burg of about two hundred inhabitants, he finds before his eyes an enterprising town of over one thousand inhabitants. Now, we have ever been ready to do ample justice to Winfield, and grant her everything she claims for herself, but she will do just as well to stop lying about her neighbors. Quite recently she has changed her tactics, and hopes for consolation in the report that "Arkansas City is to be the point for shipping cattle, but Winfield is to be the boss town of the southwest." Just stop that lying up there and you will soon observe that you resemble the boy who grew too big for his breeches: plenty to spank, but a sore place to rest on.

[PERSONALS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, June 25, 1879.

Mulvane is the name of the new town at the junction of the Cowley and Sumner R. R.

Six new buildings just completed, and six more on hand for contract. Let the good work go on.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 25, 1879.

Gen. McNeil, U. S. Indian Inspector, has returned from the agencies below. We are glad to see the General back.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 25, 1879.

There will be a meeting of the people at Bolton, at Bland's Schoolhouse, Saturday night, to discuss bridge matters.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 25, 1879.

Agent Whiteman says the Indians report that the "Steamer Cherokee" has passed on her way up the river. We now look for her certain on the 4th.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 25, 1879.

The surveying corps of the Atchison road have been quartered at the Central Avenue for several days. They now have the line permanently located to the city. The road will pass through the city on the east side.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 25, 1879.

On Sabbath evening as Mrs. Scott and Chapel were driving in the western part of the city, the horse became frightened, and making a quick turn, overset the buggy, throwing both out. The horse kicked himself loose from the buggy. There was no serious injury to either of the ladies.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 25, 1879.

Mr. Conway, just in from a trip to Wichita, says dirt is flying lively as far as Sand creek, and ties and iron going down from Wichita out. Our farmers are bidding good bye to their Wichita friends. They now say, come and see us at Arkansas City, and many of the Wichita men say we will.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 25, 1879.

CRESCENT LODGE NO. 133, A., F. and A. M., will take part in the Fourth of July celebration at Arkansas City, and hereby extend a cordial invitation to all Masons in good standing to join with us, also to lodges in this vicinity to join in the procession. By order of Lodge. S. P. CHANNELL, W. M.

I. H. BONSALL, Secretary.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 25, 1879.

The quiet of our usually peaceful city was somewhat disturbed on Saturday night, by the enacting of a scene on the street in which there were many actors. And which demonstrated the unrivaled ability of corn juice to get up a first class show. It seems that one of Uncle Sam's boys imbibed a little too much Rio, and in getting off his little speech, jostled a granger living up the Arkansas, who was in the same predicament. The granger being on his muscle so far as his tongue was concerned, immediately called the attention of the city marshal, who called to his assistance a posse comitatus, which he found in Ed. LeClare's room helping Ed. to celebrate the opening of stock in his new room. With the assistance of this posse, the arrest of one soldier was effected, and the marshal turned to catch the doughty granger, but he was nowhere to be found. And by the time the granger hunt was over, the soldiers had quietly retired some to their tents and some to the sidewalks leaving the city to the quiet and peaceful possession of the marshal. During the general melee the south end of Summit street was enlivened by a wordy war between a north side granger and a citizen in regard to taking up a runaway team, which was ended by the granger paying a good round price for the said citizen taking up the team. Law and order is now fully established. "Let her wave."

[PERSONALS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, July 2, 1879.

The market is flooded with blackberries.

Wanted. At the Kaw Agency, a good laundress.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 2, 1879.

Mrs. McClung has gone to Wichita to visit friends.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 2, 1879.

The Walnut River has been bank full for several days.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 2, 1879.

The editor started for Sac and Fox agency yesterday, to be absent about ten days.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 2, 1879.

Mrs. Land and daughter, of Indiana, are spending a few weeks at Grandpa Endicott's.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 2, 1879.

Lieut. Cushman has been quite sick, but we are glad to learn that he is now convalescent.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 2, 1879.

DIED. On Wednesday night last, at Arkansas City, infant son of Marshall Mott.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 2, 1879.

The band boys are losing no time practicing. We may expect some good music the Fourth.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 2, 1879.

Mr. Speed, of Winfield, was down last week.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 2, 1879.

MARRIED. Near Arkansas City, June 29, by Rev. J. S. McClung, Mr. Charles R. Murray and Eliza E. Briggs.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 2, 1879.

The Mitchell corner on Summit street has been sold for $800 to Mr. Matlack, and a new brick will go up on that corner.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 2, 1879.

Brother McLaughlin is building a new house in the southeast part of town. Mc. is pushing his views towards the depot.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 2, 1879.

Let it be distinctly understood that $10 will be charged for permits to sell refreshments on the grounds on the Fourth.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 2, 1879.

Gen. McNeil left last Friday for Iowa. The General always has a warm hand for a friend, and he did some shaking with our people.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 2, 1879.

DIED. The child of Aaron Arnett, of Guelph, about one year old, was taken suddenly ill Monday morning just after he had left for Wichita, and died in about two hours.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 2, 1879.

The new Agent for the Pawnees received his commission on the 17th ult., and is expected at the Agency in a few days. This time he is not a quack, but an ex-army officer.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 2, 1879.

Report says that C. R. Mitchell has gone to Topeka to master the question of locating the depot. It is time lost, Robert; that goose is cooked, and you must abide the consequences.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 2, 1879.

Mrs. Laverty left last Monday on a visit to friends in Iowa.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 2, 1879.

Greased Pole Exhibition.
Mr. Editor, I hope that the greased pole exhibition will be left out of the programme on the 4th, as no good can result from it, but possibly harm. A few years ago at Lawrence an exhibition of that kind was had, which resulted in the death of two promising and ambitious little fellows, and the lasting injury of two or three others. The winner of the prize died within 24 hours, and the most successful competitor within three days, by overexertion in trying to climb, encouraged by the cheers of the thoughtless crowd that was urging them to their own destruction and loss of health. The tears and cry of the father of one of the boys who related to me the cause of his son's death, I can never forget. Not being present, he could not prevent it. His boy came home, went to bed, but never got up. He lingered three days, then died. The blood almost burst from his face through the skin. I hope it will not be permitted to go on. JAMES CHRISTIAN.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 2, 1879.

The Semi-Weekly boils at the thought of ten thousand dollars for a public school building for the city of Winfield, and says that if you want to stop emigration, commence to vote bonds! You see, Brother Conklin, we are none of us selfish. It would hurt the city of Winfield to vote her into debt, but to create a debt to build another courthouse for the people of Cowley to pay is really a pretty thing. No, don't give ten thousand dollars for that school house to enlighten and ennoble the minds of countless numbers who are soon to make our laws and fill public places, but put the money into the courthouse and make cells and chains to protect society.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 2, 1879.

The Telegram feels sad at the thought of our city sending people to Winfield to rent buildings. Well, we regret it too; but the fact is, every room is full in this town, while parties are hard at work hauling down here some of those empty houses that you folks built, but failed to rent. They are much cheaper than to purchase the lumber. Why, man, your slur at the noble Arkansas is ungenerous. She bore the Aunt Sally upon her bosom last year, and when the boat reached here, you were mean enough to compel Newman to put in a fish race, to let her up to Winfield! Shame on you, can't our town have anything unless you feel like stealing it?

Arkansas City Traveler, July 2, 1879.

Mr. Gamp, from 12 miles west of the city, was in town last week with a part of a load of fine, large cheese, manufactured by himself and two brothers in Sumner County. Mr. Gamp says they have manufactured cheese in New York and Illinois, and that they understand the business thoroughly. He says they cannot make quite as good cheese as they could in New York, but fully as good as they could in Illinois. He feels sure they can make the business a success.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 2, 1879.

Mr. Ed. Hewins, of Chautauqua, last week crossed 1,500 head of Texan cattle at the Rock Ford, below Shiloco. This is but a part of Mr. Hewins' drive, and he says that there will be a good many thousand cattle driven to the line of roads east of us. He also says that the cattle are fattening very uneven this year; many herds have scarcely any cattle in condition at this time.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 2, 1879.

Mr. Bush, of Missouri, gave us a call last Thursday. He came here with a view to examine this part of the world for the practice of law. We found him a very pleasant gentleman. As his avoirdupois is about 300, we believe he would be something of an addition to the town. Come over and locate with us, Mr. Bush.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 2, 1879.

On Tuesday afternoon, June 24, Mr. T. A. Wilkinson, of Winfield, had his stable burned. Supposed that the fire was set by his little boy. Quite a wind prevailed at the time, but the stable happened to be located so that no other buildings were burned. It will be quite a loss to Mr. Wilkinson.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 2, 1879.

Contracts were let on Saturday last to build six new cottage houses in the west part of town. Another new cottage is starting up just east of the residence of E. D. Eddy. Our carpenters are all pushed with work.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 2, 1879.

Mrs. Waldenmeyer, who became insane at this place, and was sent to the asylum at Osawattomie, has been cured, and left the asylum. Many friends here will rejoice with the lady in her restoration to reason.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 2, 1879.

Mr. Allen, the artist, gave us a call on Saturday evening. He brought with him some fine specimens of his work. Those desiring work of this kind can do no better than to employ the services of this artist.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 2, 1879.

Agent Williams reports everything quiet at the Pawnee Agency. It is believed that the Pawnees will be paid the last of July. This will be good news to some white men as well as the Pawnees.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 2, 1879.

We acknowledge an invitation to the dance at Grange Hall, Pleasant Valley township, on the night of the Fourth. We guarantee a good time to all who may attend.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 2, 1879.

Some thieves took a keg of whiskey, two revolvers, a coat, some cigars, and six dollars in money from Pickle's saloon Monday night.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 2, 1879.

Tally one more for our celebration. Judge M. S. Adams, of Wichita, will address the people at this place on the Fourth.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 2, 1879.

Mrs. Eddy left on Monday to visit friends in Leavenworth.

[NOTICES/ADS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, July 2, 1879.

A car load of Salt just arrived and for sale at

SCHIFFBAUER BRO.
Arkansas City Traveler, July 2, 1879.

Oil Stoves. Call and see them at SIPE'S.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 2, 1879.

FINE BREECH LOADING GUNS at very low prices.

SCHIFFBAUER BROS.
Arkansas City Traveler, July 2, 1879.

Anyone wishing to purchase a farm bell will find them at O. Stevenson's, one door south of the Arkansas City House, at prices to suit the times.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 2, 1879.

STRAYED.
From the farm of Capt. Nipp in the South Bend of the Walnut, June 12th, one dark brown Stallion branded on the left hip A S bar brand. Said horse is two years old, three white feet, and long mane. Whoever returns said horse will be suitably rewarded. J. B. NIPP.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 2, 1879.

Cheapest Farm in the county, 160 acres; 40 acres under cultivation, orchard under fence, 100 Apple Trees, small fruits and grapes in abundance. Good House with an ell addition and good cellar, good well, water the year round. One half mile of hedge 3 years old. All for $500. WALTON & KNIGHT.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 2, 1879.

Sweet Apple Cider ice cold at Hermann Godehard.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 2, 1879.

Maple Syrup at Schiffbauer Bros.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 2, 1879.

"To whom it may Concern." A perfect Trussfills every indication at Shepard's.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 2, 1879.

Try the Walnut Valley Baking Powder. Schiffbauer Bros. has it.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 2, 1879.

Go to Schiffbauer Bros. for Horse Radish Powder. Only 30c. a bottle.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 2, 1879.

"Druggist Sundries" is the name of the best cigar in town. Found only at SHEPARD'S.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 2, 1879.

WANTED CASH. A good new milch cow for sale at Dr. Alexander's.

[THE GLORIOUS FOURTH - AT ARKANSAS CITY.]

Arkansas City Traveler, July 9, 1879.

A BIG DAY.
The Fourth at Arkansas City.
As time rolls his ceaseless course, every twelve months brings around to us the "day we celebrate"symbolic day of American freedom, not alone for American born, but for those from the uttermost parts as well. In the largest cities and smallest cross-roads there has ever existed a spirit of rivalry on these occasions, each trying to out-do its nearest neighbor in the matter of display and attractions for the multitude.

Our nation's birthday was probably more generally celebrated this year than in any year since the Centennial; at least this was the case in Cowley County. Patriotism was boiling and seething in every community to such an extent that a union celebration at the county seat was not to be thought of, and extensive preparations were made in four or five localities to honor the memory of the Revolutionary heroes "every man to his notion, every woman as she wills, and every child as he has been trained."

Since the organization of this county, Arkansas City has been front and foremost in all public undertakings, and her efforts are always crowned with success. This year proved no exception to the rule. As soon as it was known that Arkansas City would celebrate the Fourth, the people throughout the central and southern portions of the county knew where to come for a good time, and the committee on arrangements went to work, confident that their expectations would be realized. Nor where they disappointed.

On the night of the 3rd, the clouds rolled up from the north and gave us a liberal sprinkling, but our soil soon absorbed all superfluous moisture, making the traveling most delightful. (You see, some towns have mud, from which, good Lord, deliver us.) As early as 7 o'clock the gathering of the clams was foreshadowed by the arrival of people from every direction. They came in carriages, in wagons, on horse, and on foot"some in rags, some in tags, and some in velvet gowns." Long before the hour for the procession to form it became evident that there would hardly be sufficient room on the town site in which to form a procession, so great was the crowd of sight-seers.

About 10 o'clock, however, the Arkansas City cornet band struck up a lively air, and started for the grounds, followed by Lieut. Cushman and detachment of U. S. Regulars; carriage with Judge M. S. Adams, of Wichita, as orator of the day; the Masonic order; then a company of ragamuffins, in wagons and on horseback, dressed in the most outlandish costumes imaginable, and making the air resound with the hideous noise produced upon improvised musical (?) instruments; after which came the citizens and people from all parts of the country, making the longest procession ever witnessed in Cowley County.

When half way to the grounds the immense concourse of people paused to witness the skirmish drill by Lieut. Cushman's detachment. This was the prettiest sight of the day, and many an ex-soldier, as he watched this handful of boys in blue, called to mind the days when the cartridges were not blank, and when such performances thinned the number around the camp fires of both the Blue and the Gray. The drill was perfect in every respect, and spoke louder than words of the admirable discipline of the Lieutenant's company.

After reaching the grounds the first thing in order was the speaking. Mr. Amos Walton was the first introduced, and spoke feelingly of those who had laid down their lives that this day might be celebrated. He was followed by Judge M. S. Adams, of Wichita, who gave the main oration of the day. He is an eloquent speaker, and his patriotic utterances found echo in the hearts of his hearers. He has many friends in this city who cherish the warmest regard for him and are ever ready to welcome him to the future city of the border.

Next came the war dance by the Ponca Indians, fifteen in number, whose names are: White Eagle (the head chief), Lewis Premo (police), Little Standing Buffalo, Black White Dog, Little Black Crow, Shines White, Buffalo Head, Thick Nail, Treads on Two, Packs the Horse, Big Kansas, Harry King, Little Pole Cat, White Feather, and Makes Noise.

It is easier to imagine their grotesque movements than to describe them, and to those who had never seen anything of the kind, it was quite a treat.

In the afternoon the crowd repaired to the race grounds. In the fast running race the first money was won by Patterson's horse, "John Bascom," the second money by "Tom Thumb," and the third by a bay horse whose name we failed to learn. This race was followed by fast and slow mule races, which created considerable fun, and by a fat and lean man's race. The former was won by W. S. Vorris, of Bolton township, and the latter by G. W. Maness, of the same township, we believe.

The pyrotechnic display in the evening was also a success, with the exception of the balloon, which burned in the ascent.

The only failure to mar the complete success of the day was the dance after the fire- works. Our citizens were too tired to feel much interest in tripping the "light fantastic," especially as it was so late before commencing. Hoping the kind folks of Winfield who came down to enjoy the dance will make due allowance for this failure, our citizens extend them a cordial invitation to return in the near future, when Arkansas City's reputation for hospitality and sociability will be redeemed.

All in all, it was a glorious Fourth, and passed off with more order than has been known on any similar day for years. It is impossible to make an accurate estimate of the crowd. Some say as high as 10,000 or 11,000, but our Washingtonian proclivities forbid us to back such an estimate, and we will concluded by saying that at least 7,000 patriotic souls thronged the streets of Arkansas City on this anniversary.

[PERSONALS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, July 9, 1879.

C. M. Scott is at Cheyenne Agency.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 9, 1879.

Fresh Indian for breakfast yesterday.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 9, 1879.

Only one drunken man was seen on the Fourth.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 9, 1879.

Miss Carrie Benedict is visiting at Pawnee Agency.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 9, 1879.

George Whitney is at Manitou Springs, Colorado.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 9, 1879.

The horse race at Winfield last Monday was a tie race.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 9, 1879.

Mrs. Jas. Mitchell left for her old home in Indiana last Monday.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 9, 1879.

L. J. Webb and Bert Covert were down from Winfield last Thursday.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 9, 1879.

Messrs. Matlack and Bishop started for Pawnee Agency Saturday afternoon.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 9, 1879.

Frank Winans won the five dollars for climbing the greased pole on the Fourth.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 9, 1879.

Rev. McClenehan and wife, nee Miss Mattie Thompson, returned last Wednesday evening.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 9, 1879.

Geo. Allen has finished his work for the present at Ponca Agency, and is now with us for good.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 9, 1879.

The material for the new paper is mostly received. The office will be in the room over Benedict's store.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 9, 1879.

Rev. McClung started for Colorado on Monday for a season of rest in the mountains. He will visit friends on the way.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 9, 1879.

C. R. MITCHELL returned from Topeka Sunday evening. He reports the railroad progressing finely. Look out for the boom.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 9, 1879.

Some parties are talking of erecting a new hotel near the springs of Salt City, for the accommodation of those seeking the benefits derived from the use of the waters at that place.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 9, 1879.

Mr. Al. Mowry and W. Randall favored us with a bountiful supply of green corn last week. These gentlemen are good farmers and are always among the first in raising early vegetables.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 9, 1879.

The genial flour inspector, F. Bohle, of St. Louis, spent the greater part of last week with his friends at this place.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 9, 1879.

KILLED. A Pawnee Indian was shot through the head and killed on the south part of the townsite Monday evening. At this writing it has not been ascertained who did the shooting. We will give the evidence in full next week.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 9, 1879.

76 Horning 76, the grocer of Winfield, was in town last Saturday with Mr. Harter, of the Tunnel Mills. Mr. Horning is also interested in the mills, and is one of the most enterprising businessmen in the West.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 9, 1879.

Col. Barrett, lately stationed at this place, died at Fort Riley on the evening of the last of July, of heart-clot. The Colonel was a brave and efficient officer, and his loss will be deeply felt by his many friends within and out of the army.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 9, 1879.

Miss Etta Robinson and Miss Lowry came down from Winfield with Messrs. Lemmon and Porter to celebrate the Fourth and stimulate the boys to greater efforts in ball playing. The boys did their prettiestprobably because they had the prettiest with them.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 9, 1879.

The Arkansas City base ball club now propose to challenge the Tisdale club for three games of ball, the best two in three to receive a purse of from ten to fifty dollars. This is busi ness, and the best way to settle the championship of the county, besides making some money for the boys.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 9, 1879.

Manson Rexford left his vest at home last Friday night while he and his wife went out to view the fire-works, the heat rendering the article of clothing useless. Upon his return he found that the vest, in which were his watch and memorandum book, with notes to the value of $120, was missing. Search revealed the fact that some thief had torn the wire screen from the kitchen window, and passing through two rooms into Mr. Rexford's room, had made away with the vest and its contents. The notes are of no value to anyone but Mr. Rexford, while the memoranda are a loss not easily replaced. Without doubt the guilty party was well acquainted with the House, knew where Mr. Rexford had gone, and for how long, and took vest and all in order to make good his escape. It is evident that the thief is a resident of this town, and we only hope friend Rexford may succeed in ferreting him out, and recovering the stolen property.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 9, 1879.

G. F. Thomson, a young man of this county, entered the Agricultural College at Manhattan with $250, and in one term, after paying all his expenses, he was $15 dollars ahead, which money he earned in the Industrialist office. He entered the printing class in September, and during that term, says the Industrialist, he made sufficient advancement to be able the next term to pay his way by his work, ranking high in all his classes. The secret of his success is in the fact of his coming from Cowley County.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 9, 1879.

Dr. Dougan, well known by our citizens as the former physician for the Osages and later for the Pawnees, furnished the Semi-Weekly of last Wednesday with an account of the capture and escape of Mrs. Fanny Kelly, who was held in captivity by the Sioux for several years. He is a pleasing writer, but from the wind-up of the article, we fear that "handsome face, graceful figure, cheeks bedecked with dimples, and the blush of the rose," were a little too much for him.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 9, 1879.

The drunken louts from Grouse Creek have been in the habit of stopping at the House of Mrs. Tesh, on their way home at a late hour, and making night hideous with their fiendish yells. This must be stopped. Mrs. Tesh is lying sick, with no assistance, and our citizens should see that she has help immediately, and is protected from such disturbances as the above. A card from Dr. Griffith explains her case, and steps should be taken at once to relieve her.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 9, 1879.

In the game of base ball on the Fourth between the Winfield Whites and three of the Arkansas City club, the former were victorious by 23 to 13. The Winfield boys, of course, are elated over their hard earned victory, but our boys stand ready to take their regular nine and out-bat, out-catch, and out-run anything in the shape of a base ball club in Cowley County for money, marbles, or chalk. If you have any nerve, let's hear from you.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 9, 1879.

The following young folks came down from Winfield on the Fourth: Dave Harter and Miss Minnie Bacon, Bret. Crapster and Miss Bonnie Anderson, R. W. Dever and Miss Jennie Hane, Will Houser and Miss Maggie Dever, Fred Hunt and Miss Sarah Hodges, A. D. Speed and Miss Thompson, W. C. Robinson and Miss Minnie Cappts, Jas. Miller and Miss Minnie Hyden, A. V. Wilkinson and Miss Cora Hyden.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 9, 1879.

Last Thursday afternoon a threshing machine was put up at auction on the Mitchell corner, the proceeds of the sale to satisfy a claim of $186 and costs. Just as the people were getting ready to bid, Mr. L. J. Webb, if Winfield, stepped to the front with a mortgage on the said machine for $250, which effectually squelched the sale. In our humble opinion, some man is bound to lose money on the machine.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 9, 1879.

The latest swindle is the peddler with ten-cent packages, "warranted sure death to potato bugs; no fear of poisoning with Paris green." You are not expected to open the packages until you are ready to use them, when you will find two square blocks of wood, upon one of which is written, "Place the bug upon this block and press firmly with the other."

Arkansas City Traveler, July 9, 1879.

Mr. Phillips, formerly in business at El Dorado, has removed his stock of groceries to the terminus of the railroad, which is bound to be the best business point in the southwest. We extend him a cordial welcome, and recommend him to the patronage of the community. Competition is the life of trade, and the signs of the times point to plenty of it in Arkansas City.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 9, 1879.

Mr. Coffin, Mr. King Berry, and Mr. Andrew Berry, with the Misses Hiatt and Coffin, of the Pawnee Agency, are the most patriotic people we have heard of this year. They came seventy-five miles to celebrate the Fourth in the liveliest town in Southern Kansas, and returned firmly convinced that Arkansas City folks take the lead in hospitality.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 9, 1879.

Is there any humanity left in this town, or has the great scramble for filthy lucre overshadowed everything else, and no time left to attend to the sick? A lady has been laying for 25 days without any care except her small child, about 8 years old, and at times another little girl, about 12 years. She needs good nursing and care, and if there are any Christian women here, she ought to receive it. She is a widow, and works hard for a living, and is entitled to care on the grounds of humanity, if nothing else. "Oh, consistency, thou art a jewel." J. H. GRIFFITH, M. D.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 9, 1879.

The young folks had a dance and supper at the residence of Mr. Coombs on the night of the fourth. Between twenty and thirty couples were present, and what with good music and plenty of refreshments, we are disposed to credit the unanimous assertion that they had a splendid time.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 9, 1879.

Channell received sweetening enough last Saturday for all of Cowley County, consisting of some three hundred pounds of genuine maple sugar, all the way from Canada. It is "lappin' good truck," and we only wish we could have been in the woods last spring watching the making of it.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 9, 1879.

The committee on arrangements hereby tender their thanks to Lieutenant Cushman for his kind service at the celebration on the Fourth of July. S. MATLACK, Chairman.

I. H. BONSALL, Secretary.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 9, 1879.

Last Monday a crowd of cow boys fired into the hotel at Caldwell, barely missing some ladies. In trying to resist the constable, two of them were killed instantly. Bully for the

constable.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 9, 1879.

MARRIED.
FOX - HURST. At the residence of Mr. Hurst, in Bolton Township, on the evening of the 4th of July, 1879, by Rev. L. F. Laverty, Mr. Wm. Fox and Miss Emma Hurst.

[NOTICES/ADS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, July 9, 1879.

500 acres of first-class land for rent, for cash or on shares. Extra inducements offered.

CHANNELL & McLAUGHLIN.
Arkansas City Traveler, July 9, 1879.

Don't fail to call on Schiffbauer Bros. for the famous Sucker State Drill, 10 percent cheaper than you can get them in the State.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 9, 1879.

All this way to Schiffbauer Bros. for one of the St. John Sewing Machines. These machines have gained such a reputation that we cannot supply the demand. Come at once if you wish to be served at the POST OFFICE.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 9, 1879.

Sulky Plow, nearly new, for sale, cash or plowing. Call at the Post Office.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 9, 1879.

Wanted! Wanted!! Wanted!!! Young Chickens! Young Chickens!! At the CENTRAL AVENUE HOTEL! Immediately! Immediately!!

Arkansas City Traveler, July 9, 1879.

FOR SALE. A good second hand nickel plated double harness for sale cheap for cash. Enquire at the TRAVELER.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 9, 1879.

If you want to see a nice yard walk, go and see Berger's. If you want the material for one, go to Mr. Wilson's 1-1/2 miles north of town, and if you want the work done in good style, call on the Pennsylvania stone cutter, W. L. KREBS.

[LIEUTENANT CUSHMAN'S DANCE.]

Arkansas City Traveler, July 9, 1879.

Lieutenant Cushman's Dance.
The finest gathering of people witnessed for many years assembled at the grove on the Walnut last night, in response to a general invitation from Lieut. Cushman to enjoy the hospitalities of the soldiers in a moonlight hop.

Owing to the disturbance in the morning, by which a decrepit Indian was sent to the happy hunting grounds, the Lieutenant feared the people would be backward about turning out, and, for a while, almost abandoned the scheme, but our citizens were in a humor to dance, and before 9 o'clock some 200 of them were on the ground.

A platform seventy feet in length had been built, with seats on three sides, and a raised platform for the musicians. Overhead hung three rows of Chinese lanterns, furnishing ample light, and a dressing room had been provided for the convenience of the ladies.

The dancing commenced at 9 o'clock, and for seven hours over one hundred of the lovers of the mazy kept time to the best of music, furnished by Messrs. Sipes, Speers, Steiner, and Balcom, refreshing themselves with ice cream, cake, and lemonade, supplied by Mr. Maricle. The sum of fifty cents a number was charged, merely to help defray the expenses.

It was a decided success, and all join in pronouncing it the most enjoyable affair of the year, and in returning thanks to the Lieutenant and detachment for the perfect order maintained throughout. Those who failed to attend can only regret their action, and hold themselves in readiness to attend the next one, which will probably be given in two weeks time, and to which we invite our Winfield friends.

[NOTICES FOR PUBLICATION BY WICHITA LAND OFFICE.]

Arkansas City Traveler, July 9, 1879.

Notice for Publication.
LAND OFFICE AT WICHITA, KANSAS, June 9th, 1879.
NOTICE is hereby given that the following-named settler has filed notice of his intention to make final proof in support of his claim, and secure final entry thereof at the expiration of thirty days from the date of this notice, viz:

Samuel Park, D. S. No. 9936, for the E. ½ of N. W. 1/4 and W. ½ of N. E. 1/4, of Section 8, Township 34 South, Range 5 E., and names the following as his witnesses, viz: Walter S. Gilman of Winfield, Kansas, and John H. Fortner, of Winfield, Kansas.

R. L. WALKER, Register.
Arkansas City Traveler, July 9, 1879.

LAND OFFICE AT WICHITA, KANSAS, June 20th, 1879.
NOTICE is hereby given that the following-named settler has filed notice of his intention to make final proof in support of claim, and secure final entry thereof at the expiration of thirty days from the date of this notice, viz:

William Barber, for the Lots 3 and 4 and south ½ north west 1/4 2 34 4 east and names the following as his witnesses, viz: B. B. Wells of Arkansas City, Kansas, and Johnathan McFadden of Winfield, Kansas. R. L. WALKER, Register.

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, July 16, 1879. Front Page.

INDIAN TERRITORY.
On the Fourth Hon. B. J. Franklin, and Col. R. T. Van Horn left Baxter Springs for a twelve miles' drive over the prairie to a point in the Indian Territory which had been named for a place of meeting of the different tribes of Indians inhabiting the Territory, for a Fourth of July celebration.

Soon after the arrival of the visitors, the people gathered at the grand stand, where the speakers and chiefs assembled to address them. Mr. J. W. Hayworth, the reservation agent, on behalf of the Indians, extended a welcome and greeting to the visitors, after which he introduced Hon. B. J. Franklin, of Missouri, who was the orator of the day. After thanking the immense audience for the generous words contained in their invitation, and referring to the Fourth of July, he discussed the question relating to the policy that should be pursued toward the Indian Territory. He warmly advocated that the Indians should be made citizens of the United States, and given a ballot. Col. Van Horn, of Kansas City, followed Mr. Franklin in a few well chosen remarks relating to the necessity of suffrage. Several of the chiefs spoke with good effect, both in English and their own native language.

[EDITORIAL PAGE.]

Arkansas City Traveler, July 16, 1879.

Announcements made by several people for political office...

For Treasurer: Republican, James Harden.

For Sheriff: Republican, A. T. Shenneman.

For Register: Republican, I. H. Bonsall.

[REPORT FROM G. H. SHEARER RE LEADVILLE.]

Arkansas City Traveler, July 16, 1879.

MALTA, COLORADO, July 1, 1879.
Editor Traveler:

While sitting in my sleeping apartment (and bachelor's hall), I thought I would amuse myself by addressing you a few lines about this country and its surroundings. I arrived at this place on the 27th of April, and soon found work, which was plenty at that time, but is dull at present; but the prospects are brightening, for the carpenters especially.

You take a man from the East, North, or South who has never had any experience in a mining country or in the mountains, and he has not the slightest opinion of the mining business or the principal on which it is carried.

I took a short ramble the other day among the mines of Leadville and vicinity, and traveled about 25 miles during the day, and about 18 miles and back another, and by giving a rough estimate, I should judge there are from 8,000 to 9,000 men engaged in the mining camps.

The mountains are becoming so honey-combed that they are beginning to sink. In many places you cannot look in any direction but you will see the pits, from the beds of the rivers to the very peaks.

There are now in Leadville and vicinity 35 smelters running day and night, employing from 10 to 25 hands, each smelting from 25 to 40 tons every 2-1/2 hours to the furnace, and the most of them are running two furnaces.

When coming into Leadville it is astonishing to see the miseries of a nightnearly every other door a grog shop or a dance hall, where drinking and gambling of nearly every descrip tion are carried on. There are four churches, one school House, one hospital (the finest building in town), three banks, and houses of ill-fame too numerous to mention.

Leadville is a very fine town, but very unhealthy on account of the poisonous atmosphere from the smelting furnaces. There are many dying every day. The hearse is continually on the road. I receive a paper from your press nearly every week, bringing the glad tidings from your town and country. It is read by the people of Malta until it is nearly worn out.

I have sent for some of your land agents' papers two or three times as there are many that want to settle in Kansas this fall, but haven't received any yet. G. H. SHEARER.

[PERSONALS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, July 16, 1879.

Look out for the next soldiers' dance.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 16, 1879.

O. P. hung out a stunning sign Monday morning, the work of George Allen and partner.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 16, 1879.

The editor and George Walker returned from a two weeks' sojourn in the Territory last Monday morning.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 16, 1879.

T. A. Wilkinson, the organ man of Winfield, was in town Friday. Tom is doing a good business, and we are glad of it.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 16, 1879.

Finch, the deputy sheriff, was in town last Saturday, and went home some two hundred and fifteen dollars better off.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 16, 1879.

S. P. Channell and family started for Iowa last Sunday morning to attend Mrs. Channell's father, who is not expected to live.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 16, 1879.

Mr. Sleeth is erecting three new houses west of town for renting purposes. Messrs. Parker and Canfield have the contract.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 16, 1879.

Prof. Story has secured Prof. Wheeler, of Ottawa, Miss Hoxie of Ft. Scott, and Mr. Trimble, principal of the Winfield schools, to assist him in the next normal institute.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 16, 1879.

Patterson sold his saloon to Messrs. Smith & Frazier, of Wichita, and will go into the livery business with C. O. Brooks. The boys will keep good stock, and will make things lively in the livery trade.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 16, 1879.

If the Winfield papers were as keen to pitch into the murderer of a white man in their town as they were in the case of the killing of a Pawnee Indian by an Indian, at this place, it would look somewhat better.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 16, 1879.

Last Friday being the birthday of Miss Ella Grimes, her friends gave her a surprise party, and judging from the peals of laughter that greeted our ears about 3 a.m., they were enjoying themselves at the top of their bent.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 16, 1879.

Will Mowry received another new Packard organ last Thursday. He is working up a good trade with these instruments in this county, and parties wishing anything in this line could not do better than by calling on him.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 16, 1879.

Messrs. Payson, Shipey, and Gould, with Miss Mattie Minihan and the Misses Patten, passed through town last week en route for the Territory where they will drive dull care away by hunting, fishing, etc., until the spirit moves them to return to the land of Cowley.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 16, 1879.

The firm of Turner Bros., who lately came from Lincoln, Illinois, and started in business at Winfield, have failed, and Sheriff Harter now has charge of their stock. It begins to look as if somebody besides the mechanics couldn't make a living in the "boss town in the southwest." How is it, Conklin?

Arkansas City Traveler, July 16, 1879.

Marshal Mott resigned last Saturday morning, the onerous duties of his office proving too much for him, and the Mayor has appointed D. B. Hartsock for the position. This appointment meets the approval of all our businessmen, and the roughs may as well make up their minds to go slow hereafter.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 16, 1879.

Some time since we made mention of the fact that stone suitable for sidewalks could be obtained in Bolton Twnship. Now we would like to see our city fathers take some action in regard to substantial walks, thus obviating the necessity for constantly repairing the wooden walks, occasioned by broken or warped boards, and vastly improving the appearance of our streets. Wooden sidewalks are handy things to feed flames on in case of a fire, but for solid comfort in walking, and evidence of municipal enterprise and success, give us stone every time.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 16, 1879.

What has become of our street sprinkler? The dust parade of last Wednesday and Thursday afternoons was enough to arouse a dead man to action. We cannot hope to overcome this difficulty by sitting with idly-folded hands and theorizing upon what ought to be done. Let us be up and doing, and enable the people to tolerate open doors on our main street during extreme high winds.

The main difficulty heretofore has been the distance the sprinkler was compelled to go for water. It has been suggested (and the suggestion is a good one) that a large well be dug, and the water thrown by a windmill into a tank of sufficient capacity to supply the demand. This being the most expensive item, the cost could and should be met by city taxation inasmuch as the benefits to be derived would be enjoyed alike by all, and the burden thus distributed would be light upon the individual taxpayer. This much accomplished, some man with a good team can make a good living, and engrave his name upon the tablets of our memory as a public benefactor. Silence on this important question betokens lack of enterprise on the part of those whose duty it is to look after it.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 16, 1879.

Several parties have been taking advantage of the privilege granted them to herd cattle in the Territory, and have built houses, planted crops (mostly corn), and settled down to farming. This being against the law, Lieut. Cushman recently notified them to move their houses, fences, etc., or he would send his detachment to help them. Last Thursday was the limit fixed for Messrs. Gatliff and Dixon to vacate, but as they had not yet gone, Sergeant Jordan with six men went out to their camp near the old Kickapoo Agency, with orders to bring the parties in and destroy their houses, which they did. This is but the commencement, as there are several other parties now living in the Territory in violation of the law, and the Lieutenant will remove them as fast as he receives his instructions. While such a course falls rather severely on some of the parties, they have themselves only to blame, and must take the consequences. Messrs. Kennedy, Bell, Christy, and others might as well commence breaking up House-keeping on short notice, for their landlord's agents will be around soon.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 16, 1879.

The following is the list of letters remaining uncalled for in the post office at Arkansas City, Cowley County, Kansas, July 1, 1879.

Bigger, George

Burnett, G. W.

Bura, James

Brannon, J. W.

Barlow, Louis

Butts, Wm. H.

Bowman, Thomas M.

Beaver, Isaac

Brox, C. O.

Cobbell, B.

Coleman, H. E.

Coldsmith, William

Caldwell, Milton

Dewey, W. J.

Tassett, Rachel

Fourt, Wm. A.

Griffith, J. R.

Hunter, J. R.

Hendricks, Peter

Hogan, J. W.

Hammel, L. H.

Holt, L. L.

Holt, R. L.

Hammond, J. D.

Hurst, Mill

Holte, Robert

Jones, J. A.

James, Elizabeth

McFadden, John

McDowell, A. R.

Murray, C. R.

Moffet, John

Moffett, Thomas

Ozburn, Helen

Pickett, Mr.

Parsons, George

Pierce, W. S.

Rice, A. A.

Ransom, Morris

Rowen, John

Sears, Issac

Stinson, Issac M.

Smith, Amanda J.

Williams, Alfred T.

Titus, Eli

Ward, Frank

Walters, Geo. O.

Whiston, Wm.

Parties calling for the above will please state that they were advertised.

NATHAN HUGHES, Postmaster.
Arkansas City Traveler, July 16, 1879.

The Cowley County Normal
will begin work Monday, August 4th, at Winfield. Superintendent Story has secured an able corps of instructors, and good, faithful, practical work is promised. All teachers in the county should give their support to these schools of instruction. . . .

Arkansas City Traveler, July 16, 1879.

Editor Traveler: In your last issue was an article reflecting rather severely upon the ladies of this community, and the reputation for kindness and hospitality heretofore enjoyed by our people. To my certain knowledge several of the ladies of this town have donated provisions to the sick woman in question, and have freely offered to do anything in their power to relieve her wants. The range of this eminent doctor's vision being confined to his own family circle, it is not to be wondered at that he has not seen the ministering angels on their missions of mercy. All of us have our household duties, but I hope none of us are so blind to the calls of charity as to merit this rebuke, which the doctor might take to his own home, with some of the consistency he prates about. In behalf of some of the Christian women of this city, I have the honor to subscribe myself A LADY.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 16, 1879.

The "Boys in Blue" are preparing for another open-air dance, to be given one week from next Friday in the grove on the Walnut. The success of the last one has spurred them to greater efforts, and the platform this time is to be double width, while they will send off for more lanterns. A cordial invitation will be ex-tended to all the respectable citizens of Cowley Cunty. The pleasant time of two weeks ago guarantees a large attendance, and we hope to see many of our Winfield friends down.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 16, 1879.

The Semi-Weekly says the Indians are peaceable along the border, which does away with the necessity of U. S. troops at Arkansas City. The Semi-Weekly knows almost as much concerning the object of the troops being stationed here as a hog does about its grandmother. Wouldn't it be a good idea for you newspaper men up in that mud hole to record the disgraceful brawls of your own military men, and not take every occasion to spit your venom at Arkansas City? By getting up early in the morning and attending strictly to business, we hope to make the riffle without any of your kind assistance.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 16, 1879.

The jury in the case of the Pawnee Indian killed at this place last week returned a verdict that the deceased was shot by an unknown party. Since then the belief has grown that the Indian was killed by a fellow Pawnee, and not by a white man. Inasmuch as the soldiers are quartered at Arkansas City, and spending their money with our tradesmen, some Winfield parties are justified (?) in raising all the disturbance possible. Location, it would seem, makes all the difference in the world with some people.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 16, 1879.

W. R. SCOTT retired from the Central Avenue Hotel last Wednesday, and Dr. Chapel will hereafter conduct the same. This hotel has gained an enviable reputation since these gentlemen took charge of it, and the Doctor will sustain it. There is no better hotel in Southern Kansas, and its equal is not to be found in any town off the railroad. If you long for a square meal, with all the delicacies of the season, or for a good night's rest in the best of beds, stop at the Central Avenue.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 16, 1879.

This evening Mr. Fred. Newman, brother of our townsman, A. A. Newman, and interested in the dry goods House of George Newman, of Emporia, will lead to the hymeneal altar Miss Hood, daughter of Major Hood, one of the wealthiest cattlemen in the State. The affair promises to be decidedly recherche. The fortunate young couple will leave immediately for the East, and their many friends join in wishing them all the happiness obtainable on this earth.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 16, 1879.

There will be a basket meeting at the Parker schoolhouse next Sunday, Rev. Gans, of Winfield, officiating. There will be preaching in the morning, followed by remarks from the various members of this denomination, relating their experiences, etc., after which dinner will be served from the baskets, and in the afternoon Sunday school will be in order. All interested are invited.

P. S. We have since learned that the meeting will be held in the grove near the residence of Mr. Gillis.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 16, 1879.

George Mott, a boy between ten and eleven years old, and an earnest student of Frank Leslie's publications, grew too big for this part of the moral vineyard last Tuesday afternoon, and struck out on the road to fortune. The last known of him, he had boarded the stage at Winfield, declaring his intention to make his way back to Illinois. About the time the demon of hunger begins to gnaw at his vitals, he will think "there's no place like home." We've been thee, and know whereof we speak.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 16, 1879.

Last Wednesday evening two young bloods from Winfield drove into the city en route for the Territory. After advancing five dollars for their supper and declaring themselves good for the "balance," they drove towards the Nation, but after spilling themselves all over the ground, they returned to the hotel where they spent the night, skipping out before breakfast. They weren't drunk.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 16, 1879.

DIED. ADAM THOMPSON, of Bolton Township, and one of the oldest residents of this county, died last Saturday afternoon. He was first afflicted with bloody flux, but we understand his death was caused mainly by typhoid fever. He will be missed by a large circle of friends. The funeral ceremonies were held at the white church Sunday afternoon.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 16, 1879.

One of Winfield's young limbs of the law has offered to trade garden truck to Judge Gans for a marriage license. Inasmuch as his facilities for obtaining "country produce" are about on a par with his ability to command the cash for the payment of a license, we can't see how he is going to better himself by this proposition.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 16, 1879.

James Harden, of Dexter, announces himself this week as a candidate for Treasurer of this county. Mr. Harden is well and favorably known throughout Cowley County as a man of integrity and business thrift, and one we could heartily support should he receive the nomination.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 16, 1879.

Ed. Bouton has purchased a bell, which he hangs around his neck at night so that the folks may known when he is coming to bed, and prepare themselves accordingly. It's bad when a man gets too sleepy to know where he is going.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 16, 1879.

Whiskey was uppermost in some of the boys last Monday night, and prompted one of them to test the solidity of the saloon keeper's window glass, by hurling a rock against it. One arrest was made yesterday morning, and the party fined ten dollars and costs for drunkenness and disorderly conduct, though they failed to prove that the same party broke the glass.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 16, 1879.

We announce in this number of the TRAVELER the name of I. H. Bonsall of Creswell for Register of Deeds, subject to the decision of the Republican County Convention. Mr. Bonsall has resided in Arkansas City for several years past, and we can vouch that he is thoroughly competent for the position, as well as a true republican.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 16, 1879.

We would again call the attention of the people to the fact that all claims against the township must be presented to the township board on the last Saturday of this month, duly sworn to, or they cannot be paid. This is in accordance with a new law, and parties interested will do well to pay heed.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 16, 1879.

The Rackensacks having challenged the base ball clubs of the county for money, marbles, or chalk, the "Winfield Whites" offer them a game for marbles, the game to be played at Winfield next week. Next Saturday the Rackensacks will play the Jack Oaks on the grounds west of town.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 16, 1879.

Chief Joseph, who has eclipsed Ben. Butler in newspaper notoriety during the past year, was in town yesterday. The Nez Perces now corner with the Poncas in the Territory, but we understand they are taking steps looking toward establishing a new reservation in the north.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 16, 1879.

Knowing that success depends upon keeping one's name and business constantly before the public, Daniel Grant comes out this week with another new advertisement. Mr. Grant is a pleasant man to deal with, and always endeavors to keep a full and complete stock.

AD: D. GRANT has removed into the building formerly occupied by J. A. Loomis, on west side of Summit street, where he has opened a very large new Stock of Glass & Queensware bought in St. Louis, at lowest prices, together with a large stock of STATIO NERY and a full line of Legal Blanks for Justices, township, school districts, professional men, etc. Also Tobacco and Cigars, News and reading matter, all of which will be sold cheap FOR READY PAY. Corn taken in exchange for goods.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 16, 1879.

Persons having subscribed aid to the cyclone sufferers in Butler County and not yet paid the same will please call at Cowley County Bank and pay, so that the funds may be sent at once. W. M. SLEETH, Treasurer.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 16, 1879.

We regret to state that Mr. M. E. Welch has been compelled to quit business, suffering from swelling of the veins in his right limb. His many friends hope he will find speedy relief.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 16, 1879.

On Monday Lieut. Cushman and detachment were in the Territory warning out other parties. Kansas is the place to farm, and the sooner you find it out, the better.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 16, 1879.

Parties desiring their mail placed in boxes in the post office must pay the rent in advance each quarter, or the boxes will be let to other parties.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 16, 1879.

Dr. Hughes, recently appointed trader at Sac and Fox Agency, has purchased the stock of John Whistler, former trader at that place.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 16, 1879.

Mrs. Haywood is at Emporia attending the wedding of her brother, Fred Newman.

Cowley County Historical Society Museum