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Arkansas City Steamboats


[Rise and Fall of Steamboats in Cowley County.]
[Included: Boats and Rafts that traveled down the rivers.]
1875
Winfield Courier, February 18, 1875.

The Traveler says that Samuel Darrah, W. J. Keffer, and J. G. Titus start down the Arkansas in a flatboat with J. C. Lillie, managing Editor.

Winfield Courier, February 25, 1875.

Samuel Darrah and J. G. Titus of this place, and Mr. Keffer of Pleasant Valley, started last Monday down the Arkansas River in a flat-boat bound for Fort Smith. We wish those hardy sailors a pleasant voyage.

Winfield Courier, March 18, 1875.

Sam Darrah, J. G. Titus, and Jake Keffer, the three hardy mariners who left Arkansas City a few weeks ago to test the navigability of the Arkansas River, returned home last Saturday. They report the navigation of the river impracticable for boats larger than the Great Eastern. The party floated down in a skiff as far as Fort Gibson, where they bought ponies to bring them back.

Winfield Courier, April 29, 1875.

Titus and Darrah, of Winfield, who went down the Arkansas River to Fort Gibson in a flat boat in February last, report the route practicable, and intend to ship grain that way this fall. Give us a rest. [Newspaper source not given.]

Winfield Courier, July 29, 1875.

Indian Affairs.
By request of Mr. Berkey, of Arkansas City, on the 14th of this month we wrote Mr. Enoch Hoag, inquiring whether it would be any violation to existing government regulations of Indian Affairs to sell flour or wheat at the intermediate points along the Arkansas River in the territory should flat boating prove successful down said river. The following letter is an answer to ours.

OFFICE OF INDIAN AFFAIRS,
CENTRAL SUPERINTENDENCY,
LAWRENCE, KAN., July 22, 1875.
T. A. WILKINSON, Supt. Pub. Instruction, Winfield, Kansas.

I am in receipt of the communication of 14th instant, inquiring whether the sale of wheat and flour along the Arkansas River, in the Indian Territory at points where the demand and price would be sufficient to induce such sale, would be any violation of Government regulations, etc.

In reply I have to call thy attention to the 2nd section of the "Intercourse Law," the first clause of which I quote, to-wit:

"That no person shall be permitted to trade with any of the Indians (in the Indian country), without a license therefor from a Superintendent of Indian Affairs, or Indian Agent, or Sub Agent," etc.

Section 4 says: "And be it further enacted, That any person, other than an Indian, who shall attempt to reside in the Indian country as a trader, or to introduce goods, or to trade therein without such license, shall forfeit all merchandise offered for sale to the Indians or found in his possession, and shall moreover forfeit and pay the sum of five hundred dollars."

I am of the opinion that the traffic proposed would be a violation of the foregoing, and perhaps other clauses of the "Intercourse Law." Very Respectfully, ENOCH HOAG, Supt.

Winfield Courier, September 2, 1875.

Bowen & Berkey, of the flat-boat expedition, have returned to the City. They report the "Arkansaw" navigable 80 miles, as far as they went, and now say if Arkansas City will raise them $1,000 they will put a steamboat on the river in running order. They stopped their boat at the Pawnee Agency, as there they learned that flour in Little Rock, Arkansas, was selling at $2 per cwt. and wheat at 60 cents per bushel. They will probably attempt to turn the river "end for end," and ship wheat and flour down here next.

Excerpt...

[ARKANSAS CITY TRAVELER ITEMS.]

Winfield Courier, September 9, 1875.

Word was brought from the flat boat last Sunday, which is now near the Pawnee Agency, almost one hundred miles from this place, by the river. They report no less than three feet of water in the channel of the river, and are fully satisfied that a small steam tug could be run between Little Rock and this place. They have experienced considerable difficulty in managing the boat so as to keep it in the channel, but claim they can make a successful voyage.

1876
ARKANSAS RIVER NAVIGATION.
Winfield Courier, January 13, 1876.

The Wellington Press claims that the Arkansas River is navigable for light draft steam boats as far up as Oxford. Mr. Aldridge, a river pilot of twenty-five years experience, offers to bring a boat of one hundred tons capacity, from Fort Smith to Oxford. Said steamer not to cost over four thousand dollars. He wants a guarantee of two thousand dollars and two hundred dollars in hand.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 9, 1876.

We have received another letter from J. G. Titus, now at Muskogee, Indian Territory, asking when the Parker Brothers' boat would be up the river. He has a lot of baled hay he intends shipping to Fort Smith.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 16, 1876.

The following letter was received by E. B. Kager from a gentleman in Wisconsin, of some experience in boat building.

I noticed in the papers you sent me a communication signed "P. H. Aldridge," relative to the navigation of the Arkansas River above Ft. Smith. This is a subject in which I have taken a great deal of interest. I have for some years thought of starting a light draft steamer, and purchased a couple of engines two years ago for that purpose, and have been negotiating for some time for the building of the boat.

Six or seven years ago I was up the Arkansas River to Van Buren, and paid close attention to that stream, and also to the White River, and was told that the Arkansas River was not navigable above that place, as the river was closed by flood wood, which could not be removed.

Now, if what Aldridge said is correct, I think there is a fair chance for someone to open up a trade. How far is Oxford from your place and how near your place could I run with a boat drawing not over twenty inches of water? I could run up to Van Buren without difficulty, if I could get from there, up.

Please write me what you can ascertain in relation to the matter, what the river distance will be as near as you can, and what inducements, if any, are held out. I can build a boat here much cheaper than it can be built in your country. C. R. GODFREY.

Excerpt reflecting steamboat navigation began in 1795...

VISIT TO THE HOME OF DR. AND MRS. W. Q. MANSFIELD.
Winfield Courier, February 17, 1876.

Another historical picture is "Collect Pond and its vicinity," as it was in 1795, when Robert Fulton and John Fitch first tried their experiments in steamboat navigation. Their little yawl is holding two men, and a steam engine that one could carry off under his arm is in full view. Collect Pond was at that time where the center of New York City now stands. Center street and the Tombs now occupy the historical navigable lake.

STEAMBOAT.
Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1876.

ENOUGH stock has been subscribed by the citizens of this place to purchase a half interest in a steamboat for the Arkansas River. Parties will be sent to make the purchase, soon. A number of propositions have been received, and if the first boat makes a successful trip, others will follow. Arkansas City is the head of navigation on the Arkansas.

FLAT BOAT.
Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1876.

Parties are talking of sending another flat boat, loaded with corn and potatoes, down to Little Rock, Arkansas. The river is full to the banks now, and will continue to be for four months, if it does not vary from preceding years.

STEAMBOAT.
Arkansas City Traveler, March 29, 1876.

Parties at Plainfield, Ohio, are constructing a boat with the intention of putting in on the Arkansas River this spring, to ply between Little Rock, Ark., and this place. It will be of light draught, but capable of carrying sufficient burden to make the trips pay. Hay and corn are in good demand in Arkansas, and lumber and southern products are staple articles here. We expect to see a boat launched at this place within the next three months. The Arkansas River is the third largest river in the United States, and with proper effort can be made a navigable stream.

Winfield Courier, March 30, 1876.

The people of Arkansas City are in earnest about navigating the Arkansas River. They have raised considerable money to be invested in a steamboat and one is expected to arrive at that place from Little Rock before long. The venture shows them to be an enterprising people. They believe in doing something for themselves and the country. Should the project prove favorable, the whole county will rejoice and be benefitted by the pluck of our neighbor. It would also give additional importance to the town. It already has the best public buildings in the county and the largest business house will soon be there. Should it become a shipping point, it will add a new impetus to its prosperity.

Winfield Courier, March 30, 1876.

ARKANSAS CITY capitalists will not invest their surplus this year in the attempt to navigate a stream the Lord declared not navigable. Because, Chamberlain's instructions are to tax all "steamboat and gas company shares." That lets them out.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 5, 1876.

A BOAT drawing four feet of water could run up the Arkansas River now, without any trouble. The river is full from bank to bank. Corn could be purchased at fifteen cents per bushel, and floated down to Little Rock, where it would readily sell for seventy-five cents. If a boat should come up now, and pay cash for corn, the farmers would be hauling corn to town for a week after the boat had left in hopes of getting rid of the stale product.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 5, 1876.

From parties formerly near Plainfield, Ohio, we learn that the company now building a boat for the Arkansas, is composed of reliable men of means, who will no doubt carry out the project.

Cowley County Democrat, Thursday, April 6, 1876.

Mr. Hoyt has started from Arkansas City to make a purchase of a steamboat to navigate the Arkansas River. This looks like business.

STEAMBOAT.
Arkansas City Traveler, April 12, 1876.

Mr. Samuel Hoyt started last Sunday for Cincinnati, Zanesville, Plainfield, and the upper Ohio River, to make a purchase or offer a bonus for a boat for the Arkansas River. A company has been formed and chartered, under the laws of this State, and the matter will soon be demonstrated whether the river is navigable above Fort Gibson. If it proves a success, it will be one of the greatest blessings Cowley County and Southern Kansas has ever had. Thousands of bushels of corn, potatoes, and other products, now a drug on the market, could be sold for cash, and southern products laid down at our doors at a much lower rate, besides it will eventually open up the great lumber regions of Arkansas, and develop a section of country now scarcely inhabited.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 19, 1876.

The Arkansas River Boat.
Mr. W. M. Sleeth received a letter last week from the parties in Ohio who are building the light draught boat for the Arkansas River, stating that they had employed five additional men, and were pushing the work as rapidly as possible. Mr. Hoyt is now in the East, and will complete all the necessary arrangements soon for the trial trip. Mr. Graverock, of Kansas City, Civil Engineer of the M. K. & T. Railway Company, paid us a visit of several days this week, working up a project for two tow boats to make regular trips from St. Louis. He also visited Wichita, where he received encouragement from some of the most prominent citizens, and a promise of aid towards the project. There is enough corn in Cowley County to load a boat all summer, besides wheat, potatoes, and general produce. The matter has received considerable attention of late and will be thoroughly tested during this year.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 26, 1876.

Mr. Hoyt writes from Plainfield, Ohio, to C. R. Mitchell that the Arkansas River boat will be completed and landed at this place by the first of June.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 3, 1876.

STEAMBOAT IS COMING
-AND-
R. A. HOUGHTON & CO.
Are on hand with the Largest Stock of Staple and Fancy Groceries, Provisions, Stoneware, etc., you have seen in the City.

Tobaccos and Teas a Specialty!
Our stock of Teas is the largest ever brought to this market, and will be sold lower than ever before, and cheaper than any house in the Valley. Drop in and see us.

Store at J. H. Sherburne's old stand, one door south of City Hotel, and opposite the Cowley County Bank.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 10, 1876.

A small boat has been constructed at the Water Mills to cross the Walnut.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 17, 1876.

STEAMBOAT.
W. M. Sleeth received a letter from Mr. Hoyt, written at Zanesville, Ohio, in which he stated he had been detained longer than he expected, and would not be ready to start again before two weeks. The boat was built at Plainfield, and had to be taken to Zanesville for final completion. It is 90 feet long, 30 feet beam, and has 19 feet deck, and three foot hole. It draws from eight to nine inches of water, and is capable of carrying fifty tons on two feet of water. The first cargo brought up will probably be salt and lumber.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 17, 1876.

BOUND TO GO.
A young girl of sweet sixteen was seen running up and down the banks of the Walnut in a frantic manner last Saturday, exclaiming "I'd give five dollars to see that show." The river was up and the bridge down; she on one side of the raging Walnut while her sweetness was on the other. Her efforts were finally crowned with success by securing the aid of a boat, but lo, when they arrived in town to their moral horror they found the show was at Winfield, and again she gave vent to: "I'd give five dollars to see that show."

Excerpt...

Cowley County Democrat, May 18, 1876.

Arkansas City Items.
Mr. Hoyt says that the boat has moved down to Zanesville to put in the machinery, and will be along in June. He says a boat shall come up the river to Arkansas City, and when old man Hoyt says anything, he means it.

[NAVIGATING THE ARKANSAS RIVER.]

Winfield Courier, May 18, 1876. Editorial Page.

In regard to the scheme for navigating the Arkansas River, the Chautauqua News of the 29th, ult., says: Mr. Graverock passed through here last week on his way to St. Louis for the purpose of securing boats to run on the Arkansas River from its mouth as far up as Wichita or Arkansas City at least. If this can be accomplished, it will be a grand thing for all the country bordering upon that river. The immense amount of wheat grown in that country would then have a cheap outlet to the best markets in the world, and build up a trade rarely equaled anywhere. This would make Arkansas City an important, and soon, a very large city.

Elk Falls Ledger.

Winfield Courier, May 18, 1876.

FRED KROPP has completed his excursion boat, launched her above the bridge, and is now ready to accommodate all webb-footed pleasure seekers. For 25 cents he will carry you up the river to Island No. 10 and swim you back for nothing. The boat will carry eight persons. It is propelled by an Archimedes lever. Oars are dispensed with.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 24, 1876.

In regard to the scheme for navigating the Arkansas river, the Chautauqua News of the 29th, ult., says: Mr. Graverock passed through here last week on his way to St. Louis for the purpose of securing boats to run on the Arkansas River from its mouth as far up as Wichita or Arkansas City at least. If this can be accomplished, it will be a grand thing for all the country bordering upon that river. The immense amount of wheat growing in that country would then have a cheap outlet to the best markets in the world, and build up a trade rarely equaled anywhere. This would make Arkansas City an important, and soon a very large city. Elk Ledger.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 24, 1876.

The steamboat for this place leaves Zanesville, Ohio, June 29th. It will take three weeks or more to make the trip. Preparations are being made to ship corn and potatoes during the summer, and hay and flour in the fall.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 31, 1876.

Last Monday was the day for the Arkansas City boat to leave Zanesville, Ohio. It will probably take four weeks to make the trip, going via the Ohio to Cairo, then down the Mississippi to the mouth of the Arkansas, then up the Arkansas: a total distance of probably 3,000 miles.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 31, 1876.

The boat started from Zanesville, Ohio, last Monday, if nothing interfered. The types made us say the start was to be in June, last week, when it should have been May.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 14, 1876.

FROM THE STEAMBOAT.
Major Sleeth has just heard from Mr. Hoyt again, on the steamboat question. The letter was dated Parkersburg, West Virginia, June 5th, and stated they were coming along all right, until near Gallipolis, Ohio, where the wheel received some injury, and they were compelled to stop six days for repairs. They expect to reach Little Rock, Arkansas, by July 1st, or within the next two weeks. Boats run to Little Rock and Fort Smith, without difficulty, and the only experiment will be from those points to this place, during low waters. When the river is full, a boat of any ordinary size could run on the Arkansas. This enterprise offers the only outlet for our immense grain crop, and is looked forward to with great anxiety by all.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 14, 1876.

The steamboat for this place left Zanesville, Ohio, June 3rd, and is now on the way. The name of the boat is "Gen. G. F. Wiles," named for a prominent boat builder of Zanesville.

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, June 21, 1876.

STEAMBOAT.
The damage to the wheel was repaired at Gallipolis, and the boat is on the way again. Mr. Samuel Hoyt is the Captain, and is determined to bring it through if it takes all summer. At Gallipolis he was arrested and fined $55 for not registering the boat, according to law. Being new men at the business, they were not aware of the rules. July 15th is the time set for the arrival of the "Gen. G. F. Wiles" at this place. It should be renamed "Samuel Hoyt," "Arkansas Traveler," "Wash-a-wa ha" (the Osage meaning for "brave white man,") or the "Relief," from the fact that the boat is to relieve us of the burden of hauling our products fifty miles to market. The present name has no meaning to us.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 28, 1876.

The Indians are willing to have boats on the river, but object to railroads.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 28, 1876.

ARRANGEMENTS are endeavored to be made to send some parties to Little Rock, Arkansas, to meet and come up on the Arkansas City boat.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 28, 1876.

FLAT BOAT.
S. C. WINTIN and M. A. FELTON are about to build a flat boat, and load it with corn for the Little Rock market. Mr. Wintin made one trip before with flour, and thinks corn will pay.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 28, 1876.

A man across the Walnut saw the box of a header machine, near the Arkansas River, and thinking it was a steamboat, left his plow and ran a hundred yards toward it, when he thought there was no smoke, and taking a closer view saw his mistake. He is a Granger too.

Winfield Courier, June 29, 1876.

The steam boat, Gen.'l Wiles, now on its way to Arkansas City, while passing down the Ohio river near Gallipolis, Ohio, was overhauled and its managers made to pay a fine of $55 for failing to register it before going "down the Ohio." It is probably on the stormy Mississippi by this time.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 5, 1876.

STEAMBOAT! The steamboat, "Gen. Wiles," passed Cincinnati on the 23rd ult., making seventy miles per day. Everything is in working order, and progress will be made without further delay if no accidents occur.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 5, 1876.

A BOAT VOYAGE.
Last week William Fowler completed his sail boat, measuring sixteen feet long, and started for Little Rock, Arkansas, with his carpenter tools, provisions, and worldly possessions. He had his boat made with a wheel on each side, to turn with a crank, while sitting on the front seat facing the bow, and an attachment made to the rudder so as to steer with his feet, besides a strong sail to be used when the wind is favorable. He returns to Arkansas to remain permanently, as mechanics' wages are good and work plenty; besides, he has made the necessary arrangements to take unto himself a rib, to share the toils and privations of a life in the swamps.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 12, 1876.

HURRAH! The boat is on the Arkansas, and coming right along.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 12, 1876.

We expect to announce the arrival of the "Gen. Wiles" steamboat at this place within the next three weeks.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 12, 1876.

The Arkansas City boat is now stemming the current of the Arkansas River, not a great distance from Little Rock. If they take on coal in the Territory, it will delay them two weeks, as it has to be dug yet.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 12, 1876.

The following, from the Cowley County Telegram, gives an unbiased expression and feeling of gratitude in behalf of the farmers, and general progress of all.

STEAMBOAT.
It gives us pleasure from time to time, to give all the information in regard to the Arkansas City steamboat that we can glean from the "TRAVELER." We look upon this experiment as one in which the whole of Cowley County is deeply interested--and for the success of which each and everyone of her citizens should pray. The successful navigation of the Arkansas River as far north as Cowley County is the next best thing to a railroad--in fact, we believe that it would be much better for the county as it would present a much cheaper outlet for surplus produce than we could possibly get through the medium of any road. And the arrival of the boat now coming should be the signal for a general rejoicing throughout the entire county. We suggest that when our neighbors can have the exact day of its arrival that they notify the county so that the farmers may be there en masse to send up a shout of joy when the smoke stack first rises in view, and send up cheer after cheer in answer to the tones of its whistle and peal of its bell. What say you, Scott? Can't you make that a "big day" for the little city?

Cowley County Democrat, July 13, 1876.

The last report from the steam boat was that it had reached Little Rock, Arkansas, and was making rapid strides for its destination. It is thought it will arrive at Arkansas City by the 20th of this month.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 19, 1876.

In looking over the county papers, and talking with gentlemen from different sections of the county, we find it is generally expected that Arkansas City will have a grand celebration when the steamboat arrives. The people of Winfield and Oxford have asked us to notify them as to the exact time of its arrival, when they will endeavor to come down and help us out in our jollification. To this we say, we will do our best to notify all, but the probabilities are the whistle will be the first warning we will have of its approach--in which case the fandango can be postponed until the day following, when we want everybody in the county here to yell, and we promise them the demonstration will eclipse anything of its kind ever witnessed in Cowley County.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 19, 1876.

C. R. MITCHELL received a letter from Wm. Fowler, who left this place June 24, for Little Rock, Arkansas, in a small sail boat, in which he reports his safe arrival at Russellville, some seventy miles below Fort Smith. He had a rough time of it, as the river was constantly raising and filled with driftwood; but he made good speed, traveling 150 miles in one day, and being but six days in making the distance. He made inquiry concerning the "Gen. Wiles," but it had not at that time reached Little Rock, though it must be near Ft. Smith now.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 19, 1876.

FLATBOAT.
Mr. M. A. Felton started for Wichita, last Saturday morning, with the intention of building a flatboat there and floating pine lumber down the Arkansas to this place. He thinks he can come down in one day at the present stage of the water.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 26, 1876.

The money has been subscribed, and a sail and row boat fitted out to go down the Arkansas, with Messrs. McLaughlin and Chamberlain as voyageurs. Their purpose is to meet Mr. Hoyt and the steamboat, and return with them.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 26, 1876.

We learn that Messrs. Tolles and Endicott, of Grouse Creek, built a flatboat, twenty-five feet long by six feet wide, and loading it with 4,000 pounds of flour, started on Sunday morning down the Arkansas to find a market. This is just a trial trip; but if successful, it is their intention to ship all their flour in that direction.

Winfield Courier, July 27, 1876.

The steamboat that has been expected at Arkansas City, at last accounts was detained at the mouth of the Arkansas River because the engines were not strong enough to stem the current.

Winfield Courier, July 27, 1876.

We learn that Messrs. Tolles and Endicott, of Grouse Creek, built a flatboat twenty-five feet long by six feet wide, and loaded it with 4,000 pounds of flour, started on Sunday morning down the Arkansas to find a market. This is just a trial trip, but if successful, it is their intention to ship all their flour in that direction. Traveler.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 2, 1876.

A. O. HOYT received another letter from his father last Monday night. At the time of writing (July 24) he was at Pine Bluff, Arkansas, where they had been further detained by sickness of the crew. He now thinks the power of their engine is sufficient to bring the boat up to this place.

Winfield Courier, August 3, 1876.

The heavy firing heard the other morning south of town was supposed to be at Arkansas City. It was thought the steamboat had arrived. It proved to be two modern Nimrods that went out early to head off the game law.

Excerpt...

Winfield Courier, August 3, 1876.

Items From the Traveler.
A. O. Hoyt received another letter from his father last Monday night. At the time of writing (July 24) he was at Pine Bluff, Arkansas, where they had been further detained by sickness of the crew. He now thinks the power of their engine is sufficient to bring the boat up to this place.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 9, 1876.

A LETTER from the steamboat men informs us that they were at Little Rock on the 31st of July. They are coming right along, don't forget it.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 9, 1876.

The latest news from the steamboat is to the effect that a new engine is being bargained for, which will cause a further delay of about two weeks.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 9, 1876.

The Oxford people are taking a lively interest in the navigation of the Arkansas River, knowing that the success of the experiment is the success of the farmers and businessmen.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 9, 1876.

Messrs. McLaughlin and Chamberlain, who left this place in a sail and row boat the 25th of July, arrived at Fort Gibson August 1st. They intend coming back with the "Gen. Wiles."

Arkansas City Traveler, August 9, 1876.

The people of Arkansas City are enterprising and industrious. For nearly half a year they have expected a small steamboat up the Arkansas River. We admire their pluck, and do not wonder at the growth, beauty, and order noticeable in this border town. Indian Herald.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 16, 1876.

On Friday afternoon another boat left this place, having on board Mr. Barnes, Al. Mowry, and Frank Speers. They intend to come back with the steamboat, Mr. Barnes as pilot, with Al. and Frank as engineers. A letter was received from the parties in Little Rock last Thursday, stating that they purposed starting from that place with the steamer yesterday.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 23, 1876.

L. McLaughlin writes from Little Rock, Arkansas, that they would "fire up and start the boat for this place in one hour." We suppose that by this time they are well on the way.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 30, 1876.

STEAMBOAT.
Mr. Hoyt, A. Chamberlain, and L. McLaughlin returned from Little Rock last week, and Allen Mowry and the pilot are expected soon. It was found that the boat with its present power could not come farther on account of the strong current over the rapids above Little Rock. A new engine is to be put on and another trial made soon. The pilot reports good water all the way down, and the only difficulty is insufficient power. Parties at Little Rock offer to put on the additional engine, and take an interest in the boat in order to make the enterprise a success, or put a boat of their own on the river as soon as one can be built, and run the two. Mr. Hoyt deserves great credit for the effort made to bring the boat up. His health failing, he was compelled to come home, and is at present down with the Arkansas chills.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 30, 1876.

A railroad and steamboat meeting was held at Kager's office Monday evening, and it was determined to offer an inducement to parties at Little Rock to come up with one of their large boats.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 6, 1876.

STEAMBOAT!
Mr. E. B. Kager received a letter last night from Mr. H. O. Barnes, the pilot who explored the Arkansas River from this place to Little Rock, in which he says there is plenty of water, and a larger boat with a more powerful engine will start for this place in two days. She gets $300 when he lands at this place and a load back. The name of the boat is the "Inspector." In side of four weeks we expect to see her.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 13, 1876.

STEAMBOAT meetings will be held in the different school districts this month for the purpose of organizing a company whereby the farmers can ship their own products.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 13, 1876.

ANOTHER BOAT.
The Baird Brothers are building a skiff boat to convey two passengers down the Arkansas. The parties hire the boat built, and expect to make a voyage to the Mississippi.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 20, 1876.

Steamboat Meetings!
Meetings will be held at the schoolhouses in the several school districts, to discuss the question of steamboat navigation on the Arkansas River, as follows:

At Salt City Schoolhouse, Parker's Schoolhouse, South Bend Schoolhouse, Bland's Schoolhouse, Coburn's Schoolhouse, Wednesday, Sept. 20, at 7 p.m.

At Theaker's Schoolhouse, Hunt's Schoolhouse, Holland's Schoolhouse, Spring Side Schoolhouse, Thomasville Schoolhouse, Maple City Schoolhouse, and the store at Silverdale, Thursday, Sept. 21, at 7 p.m.

Speakers will be in attendance, and all are requested to be present and express their views.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 20, 1876.

REMEMBER the steamboat meetings.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 20, 1876.

MR. HOYT's report of his steamboat trip was made in full, at the meeting, last Monday.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 20, 1876.

DOWN THE RIVER.
Chas. McIntire and Will. Leonard are having a boat built to make a voyage down the Arkansas. They are to engage in the rubber stamp business on the way.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 27, 1876.

CHARLES McINTIRE and WILL LEONARD started from Harmon's ford yesterday, for the voyage down the Arkansas. They have a good boat, covered with oil cloth, with a portable stove in it to do their cooking, and expect to float all the way to New Orleans.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 27, 1876.

RETURNED.
FRANK SPEERS, AL. MOWRY, MR. BARNES, and WILL ALEXANDER returned last night from Little Rock, where they have been looking after the Arkansas City boat. Most all of the number had been sick, and had a rough time of it.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 4, 1876.

The boys tell some amusing anecdotes of their trip down the Arkansas. To avoid mosquitoes, they generally slept on a sand bar, and were almost certain to hear the steamboat coming every night. Nothing can be done until a new engine is put in, and our citizens are endeavoring to have it done, so that the boat can come up.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 11, 1876

A meeting was held at Salt City yesterday in the interest of the steamboat enterprise. Speakers from abroad were present and much was said but little was done. If a sail-boat was built and these blowers from Arkansas City and Little Rock would take charge of it, drift sand would be but little bother. Sumner Co. Democrat.

Come boys, Sumner County is as much interested in the navigation of the Arkansas River as Arkansas City; if she is not, she should be. It requires no bonds for a steamboat.

Excerpt from long article...

Arkansas City Traveler, December 13, 1876. Front Page.

The Arkansas River is navigable as far as Ft. Gibson, and the recent exploration by Capt. Barnes, and his party, proved it could be navigated as far north as this county. A test is being made at the present writing.

1877
Excerpt...

Arkansas City Traveler, January 3, 1877.

Efforts are being made to clear the Arkansas River for steamboat navigation to this point. It is expected this object will be realized. Its consummation will bring a happy day to Arkansas City.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 14, 1877.

A proposition has been made, and accepted by a steamboat man, for the bringing of the "General Wiles" from Little Rock, Arkansas, to this place.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 14, 1877.

STEAMBOAT.
Mr. Graverock, an engineer of Kansas City, of some reputation, has accepted the proposition of the Boat Company of this place to bring the steamboat "Gen. Wiles," from Little Rock to this place, and says it is only a question of time when he will reach here. He owns one small boat that was built for, and is being used, on the Neosho River for carrying rock for bridge purposes, and intends to bring it up also.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 21, 1877. Front Page.

From Salt City.
SALT CITY, March 15, 1877.
Editor Traveler:

DEAR SIR: Shortly after the 7th of November last, we started up the Arkansas River on the steamer Gen. Wiles for Washington, to look after the post office at your city. After traveling for several weeks, with prospects the brightest, on nearing an island opposite Big Bend, we saw an armed force, and supposed they were friends, but afterwards found them to be enemies, strongly fortified. They ordered us not to attempt to pass. We finally laid siege, and after several weeks of most bitter struggling, they sent out a flag of truce with the following: "You can't take an eight spot with a seven." They went back and opened out on us with all vengeance, and we soon finding ourselves overpowered by numbers, dropped back, and off to the left to the mouth of Salt water. In order to save ourselves, we ran up Salt water some distance, and on examination found the water was getting hot. Fearing some evil ahead, we dropped back and made for land, and on nearing land we were met by friends, who welcomed us among them, even offering us the post office of this city. Now that the struggle is over, we feel safe, happy, and contented. The country is lovely, with good lands and cheap homes for all that may wish to come among us. W. M. BERKEY.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 2, 1877.

STEAMBOAT COMING.
MR. GRAVEROCK, who has contracted to bring the "General Wiles" steamboat, belonging to the company at this place, from Little Rock, says he will make the start in about thirty days. He asked for more time so as to allow him to finish erecting a bridge in Neosho County that he has the contract for.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 30, 1877.

LUMBER RAFT.
Last week Thos. Baird, Will Alexander, Chester Loveland, and a stranger lashed 15,000 feet of pine lumber together, at Wichita, making three rafts of it, and started for this place.

For awhile everything was a success, but as the lumber became soaked and the lashing more slack, trouble began to grow apparent. They followed the current, making time at the rate of ten miles an hour, until the river made a sudden bend, when one of the rafts struck a tree. The man jumped off of it and tied the rope, but the current was too swift, and it sped on down the river. When the others came along they tied up for the night, and in the morning went in search of the missing raft, which they found in a corn field not far away. The result of the experiment was, one raft left seven miles from Wichita, one left twelve miles above Oxford, and one that came through all right. The boys think if they were to try it again, they could come through safely.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 30, 1877.

CHESTER LOVELAND, formerly a resident of this place, made a short call last week. He came down from Wichita on Thomas Baird's lumber raft.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 6, 1877.

VOYAGERS. Tom and Jake Haney and Hallett, with their wives, started on a journey to Arkansas in a small boat last week. They were making twelve miles an hour when last seen.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 13, 1877.

From Silverdale.
SILVERDALE, June 11th, 1877.
The Haney brothers and Mr. Hallett started down the river last Tuesday, the 31st of May. Their boat was well made, and large enough to carry 20 tons. It was 12 x 80 feet, with gunnels 4 x 16 inches, with an additional plank, 2 x 10, pinned down four inches on the outside of the main gunnel, giving a depth of 22 inches. When loaded with their household goods, it drew about six inches of water. The good wishes of all their friends accompany them on their way. Mr. Haney intends to work at his trade in Arkansas.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 27, 1877.

Another boat for the Lower Arkansas is now tied up at the bridge. It is sixty feet long, and provided with two cabins all complete and painted. Wichita Eagle.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 4, 1877.

ANOTHER BOAT, about thirty-five feet long by twelve feet eight inches in width, is lying at the west ferry with a load of drugs, bound for Fort Smith. It has a cabin on each end, and contains thirteen persons and five tons of chattels. Dr. Trichen, of Wichita, has command of the vessel, and is moving his entire drug store from the railroad terminus of Sedgwick County.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 4, 1877.

MANSON REXFORD started from this place last Thursday morning, and reached Kaw Agency Friday morning with a load of machinery for the Agency, weighing 1,820 pounds.

His boat was six by sixteen feet.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 22, 1877.

THREE MEN STOLE CHARLES GALLERT'S BOAT and went down the Arkansas River.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 22, 1877.

ANOTHER BOAT from Hutchinson is making a trip down the Arkansas. It was anchored at the bridge last Sunday.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 21, 1877.

Survey of the Arkansas.
Thomas Ryan, representative in Congress from the third district of Kansas, introduced a bill in the House on the morning of No. 14th, to provide for an examination and survey of the Arkansas River from Fort Smith, Arkansas, to the mouth of the Little Arkansas, in Sedgwick County, Kansas, to ascertain whether it is practical and what it will cost to improve the same that it will be suitable for navigation of commercial boats and vessels. Mr. Ryan has been advised by men familiar with the river that it is susceptible of such improvement at a cost not exceeding two hundred thousand dollars. Parties who have made the voyage from this place to Little Rock say the river can be made navigable at a comparatively small expense.

Arkansas City Traveler, December 12, 1877.

ANOTHER FLAT BOAT.
Capt. Peter Myers and J. Reed, Chief Clerk of the stern oar, started for Pawnee Agency last week with a cargo of corn. When last heard from they were doing well--(on a sand bar).

Arkansas City Traveler, December 12, 1877.

STEAMBOAT.
Mr. Bacon, a gentleman who has been engaged in running a steamboat on Lake Michigan for the past four years, is here to make a proposition to run a boat from Little Rock to this place, for a bonus of one thousand dollars, to be paid when the boat has made the second trip. He has examined the river, and claims a boat can be run without difficulty if the power is sufficient. The money will be subscribed and a contract entered into for the boat to be here next spring.

Winfield Courier, December 13, 1877.

ARKANSAS CITY ITEM.
Steam boating is the order of the day again. A man, calling himself Bacon, agrees to bring a steamboat up the Arkansas for the modest sum of one thousand dollars, payable when he arrives at our dock. Our people are not quite as anxious for a steamboat ride as they were a year or two ago.

1878
Winfield Courier, January 17, 1878.

A man named Bacon has examined the Arkansas River from Little Rock to Newton, Kansas, and proposes for a bonus of a thousand dollars to run a steamboat to the latter place.

Journal of Commerce.

We would suggest to our friend of the Journal that he post himself in the geography of Kansas in the contemplation of a trip to Newton via steamer. Eagle.

Winfield Courier, January 17, 1878.

The Journal of Commerce is all right on geography. The twenty-five miles of prairie from Newton to the old sand bed, called the Arkansas River, is quite level and sandy, and we don't see why a steamboat could not navigate it as well as it could from Wichita down through the sand of that old river bed.

Winfield Courier, January 17, 1878.

C. M. Scott, of the Traveler, has found time to visit this city twice within a week, which is pretty well for him considering his other work. Here is what the Traveler says he has to do.

"Besides the every day pursuit of publishing a newspaper, attending post office, making collections, or rather trying to, soliciting subscribers, etc., he is a notary public, agent of some Ohio capitalists, buys and sells corn, oats and flour, deals heavily in and makes a specialty of cord wood, posts, and rails, buys, trades, and sells Texas and Indian ponies, is a member of two railroad companies, a director in the Arkansas River Navigation Company, deacon in a new church organization, is interested in a racing pony, contractor for buildings, and other minor enterprises too numerous to mention, all to make both ends meet."

And we are informed that he visits his girl two nights a week in addition.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 23, 1878.

A SMALL FLAT BOTTOMED BOAT was built and placed on the river last week; bound for Fort Smith.

Winfield Courier, February 7, 1878. Editorial.

ANTI-SUBSIDY.
The house has passed a resolution, ayes 179, naes, 95, that in its judgment no subsidies in money, bonds, public land endowments, or by the pledge of public credit, should be granted or renewed by congress to any person or association to engage in public or private enterprises, but that all appropriations should be limited to such purposes and amounts as shall be imperatively demanded by the public service.

We believe this is the true doctrine if the term public service includes removing obstructions to navigation and communication. We hold it to be proper and right that the government should, for instance, keep an open channel for navigating the Mississippi; but we do not hold that it should allow a private association to own the river and control it for private or corporate profit.

It might have been well enough that the government should have constructed the first road to the Pacific (it did do so in fact for the subsidies it furnished in aid, if judiciously applied, would have built and equipped the road and have left a large margin for profit), but it is not right that a private corporation should own or control the road for the profit of such corporation after the government has built or even aided in building it.

Whatever the government aids in building, clearing, or repairing, it should control for the public benefit and no person or corporation should have any special interest or control therein. It should either be for the exclusive use of the government or be open for the use of all citizens of the United States on equal terms.

The Union Pacific has been a public benefit, of course, but it has been the greatest swindle that was perpetrated on the nation. One-half of the swindle, if judiciously applied by the government, would have made a better road and better equipments, and then the government would have been in a condition to control it and keep it open to the whole public on equal terms, regulating its use and collecting a revenue on its business. It would belong to the public just as the Mississippi does.

We hold that as the government is expending large sums of money on the Eads's jetties to provide for the passage of the mouths of the Mississippi by large vessels, she has the entire control of these channels and it would be right and proper for her to collect a revenue therefrom.

The Tom Scott Texas Pacific subsidy scheme is another projected swindle, second only to the Union Pacific and should be at once stamped with the condemnation of every member of congress and all thinking, honest men. The principle of the resolution adopted by the house is right and should be crystallized into and become a part of the constitution of the United States.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 20, 1878.

FROM LIPPMANN'S MILL.
Lippmann is running on full time. During the last week there were two rafts of lumber, of ten thousand feet each, landed at Lippmann's landing on the Walnut. The Murphy movement has reached the mill. They have also formed an anti-tobacco society. The Ragamuffins and Advance had a boat race on Saturday. The Ragamuffins came out victorious, they challenge any two men in Creswell township for a race. If accepted, leave word at the mill. Strayed or stolen from the mill, three jacks, two blacks, and one red one. Persons finding the above will be rewarded by calling at the mill and leaving the property.

DEAD BEAT.
Arkansas City Traveler, February 27, 1878.

The papers have it now that "A man named Newton has examined the Little Rock as far as Arkansas, and proposes for a thousand pounds of Bacon to run a river from Arkansas City to the Journal of Commerce." The item originally was as follows.

A man named Bacon has examined the Arkansas River from Little Rock to Arkansas City, Kansas, and proposes for a bonus of a thousand dollars to run a steamboat to that place.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 10, 1878.

Survey of the Arkansas River.
The following letter from our energetic representative in Congress, shows that the "improbable" survey of the Arkansas is to be made. Thanks to our wide awake member.

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,
WASHINGTON, D. C., April 2, 1878.
Friend Scott: The House Committee on Commerce has agreed to provide for a survey of the Arkansas river from Fort Smith up to the mouth of the Little Arkansas, to determine the practicability and cost of making it navigable for commercial boats. The survey will be thorough, embracing the subjects of river, slack water, and casual navigation.

THOMAS RYAN.
Arkansas City Traveler, April 17, 1878.

The Great Valley.
ARKANSAS CITY, KANSAS, March 28, 1878.
[From the Lawrence Standard.]
ED. STANDARD: In the past 48 hours we have had copious showers. The ground is now soaking wet, and it is pouring down rain. This insures our wheat crop, unless some unforeseen event happens to injure or destroy our prospects. Our wheat crop never looked better at this season of the year. In many places it is two feet high, much of it jointing. But the oldest inhabitant never heard, saw, or dreamed of such a season as this. Our peach trees are nearly all out of bloom, and the leaves are out quite green in the woods; some trees, as the maples, are almost in full leaf. The prairies are quite green--as much so as I have seen them in May. Our farmers are preparing for harvest already, selecting their reapers, harvesters, and headers. This season nearly all the harvesters are supplied with self-binders. In a few years, if our agricultural machinists keep on inventing, our farmers will have nothing to do but oversee and give instructions, ring a little bell, and the horses will hitch up themselves and go to work, plow and sow, reap and mow, and haul the grain to market.

Our implement dealers have the sidewalks encumbered with plows of all descriptions--

breakers, stirrers, sulky, and gang plows of all kinds, patterns, patents, and descriptions, besides a lot of implements that I don't know the use of.

With such machinery skillfully handled in our productive soil, with seasonable weather, who can contemplate the amount of produce that Cowley County might raise and export? Oh, if we only had an outlet down the Arkansas river to New Orleans direct, instead of going 1,100 miles around by way of Kansas City and St. Louis to get there! It is exactly the same distance from this place to Fort Smith, Arkansas, as it is to Kansas City, Missouri, and precisely the same distance to Napoleon, at the mouth of the Arkansas, that it is to St. Louis. At Napoleon we are only 615 miles above New Orleans--48 hours by steamer--while St. Louis is 1,240 miles, usually six days by steamer.

With the Arkansas River open for navigation from this place or Wichita to the mouth, there need be no famine in China, India, or elsewhere. The fertile valley of the Arkansas, like the Nile of old, would be the granary of the world. Its mild and healthful climate, rich and productive soil, must soon attract the attention of emigrants to its mines of hidden wealth. If our Government would spend one-fifth the amount in the cleaning and improving of our noble river that she does on some eastern harbor or ocean project, our most sanguine hopes would be more than realized, and it would pay the world at large in getting cheap food for the starving millions.

We want no protection from the Government for our labor. All we ask is a cheap outlet to the sea, the highway of nations, down to the Father of Waters. Broad or narrow gauge railroad bonds may, like physic, be thrown to the dogs.

I see your people and Kansas City are on the right track--the agitation of river navigation and improvement. It is the poor man's best hold. No pooling or combination in that. The mud scow and the floating palace have the same rights there. It is open to all, like the king's highway--the rich man's coach or the tinker's cart. Keep the ball rolling. Hurrah for Eads and river navigation. JAMES CHRISTIAN.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 24, 1878.

Navigation of the Arkansas--Biggest Thing Yet.
A company of old settlers at Arkansas City are constructing a small flat bottomed steamboat, to play upon the Arkansas River below Wichita. That this enterprise is practicable, has never been questioned by river men who are acquainted with this stream. The Arkansas at all stages flows a sufficient volume of water.

The only obstacle to the navigation of this river, that has ever been apprehended, arises from the numerous bars of light sand, which it has been argued, were liable at any time to effect sudden changes in the current or channel. These men (one of whom is an old river boatman) says that every trip made with a boat has a tendency to draw the water to the proper channel, and to assist in removing or washing away these, by no means formidable, bars of light and floating sand. These parties are the first who have proposed to make a practical test, and we now hope the matter will be thoroughly tested, and have full faith in final success.

With the Arkansas River navigable even for small craft, it will secure to this part of the valley a position, and commercial advantages which can be acquired from no other source. Let the people take hold of this enterprise with a will, and extend the necessary aid and encouragement, and doubtless ere many months the people of this valley may receive their freight and ship their produce from points within their own borders. Sumner Co. Democrat.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 24, 1878.

Mr. A. Walton, of Arkansas City, was in town last Friday. Mr. Walton came up to ascertain how much the Oxford people would subscribe to a project, now on foot, to construct a boat, to be propelled by steam, to navigate the Arkansas river between Wichita and Arkansas City. Mr. Walton says that the subscribers will not be requested to pay their subscription until one trip has been made between those points. Mr. Walton proposes to use a flat boat now at Arkansas City, and by using an ordinary steam engine and stern wheel, intends to experiment on the navigation of the Arkansas River. This sounds like business, and our people should give it a careful consideration before passing it by. Democrat.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 24, 1878.

Messrs. Speers and Walton, of Arkansas City, are endeavoring to obtain the aid of the towns on the Arkansas River for the purpose of running a light draft boat between that point and Wichita. The boat is built, the machinery spoken, and everything in readiness to push the experiment. Mr. Walton was in town on the 12th looking after their interests. The citizens of this place will hold a meeting on the night of the 17th, to hear the gentleman's plans and objects, and to discuss the feasibility of the project. Independent.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 24, 1878.

Oxford is agitating the question of steamboat navigation on the Arkansas River, between Arkansas City and Wichita. The project looks feasible. Ex.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 24, 1878.

SPEERS and WALTON will have their steam ferry boat ready to run this week, and before long will make a trial trip to Oxford, El Paso, and Wichita.

Winfield Courier, April 25, 1878. Editorial Page.

[Item from Wichita Eagle.]
The steamboat spoken of on our second page is expected to reach Wichita about the 15th of next month. T. M. Lane and other gentlemen are enthusiastic in the belief that the enterprise will succeed. Messrs. Walton & Spears, who are putting their money into it, say they know they can navigate the Rackensack to the mouth of the Little river. If the government survey should determine Wichita to be the head of navigation and experience should determine the same thing, why--Wichita will be the biggest city in the west.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 1, 1878.

SURVEY OF THE ARKANSAS RIVER.
Our Member of Congress Moving in the Matter,
And a Company Building a Steamboat--One Coming to Wichita.
[From the Wichita Eagle.]
Thomas Ryan, our Member of Congress, writes, under date of April 2, that the House Committee have agreed to a survey of the Arkansas River. The following is the letter written to Scott, of Arkansas City.

WASHINGTON, D. C., April 2, 1878.
FRIEND SCOTT: The House Committee on Commerce has agreed to provide for a survey of the Arkansas from Fort Smith up to the mouth of the Little Arkansas, to determine the cost and practicability of making it navigable for commercial boats. The survey will be thorough, embracing the subjects of river, slack water, and canal investigation.

THOMAS RYAN.
In this connection Messrs. Walton and Speers, of Arkansas City, are building a light draught boat, of fifty feet length by sixteen feet beam, capable of carrying twenty ton of freight, drawing about seventeen inches of water. The boat is about ready to receive its engines, and the proprietors propose to visit Wichita within two or three weeks, we believe. These gentlemen are satisfied that after once learning the channel, they will find no difficulty in making regular trips, and to that end they were interviewing our businessmen on Monday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, May 2, 1878. Front Page.

[Item from the Wichita Beacon.]
Messrs. Speers & Walton, of Arkansas City, are proposing to open navigation between Arkansas City and Wichita. They have a boat already built 16 x 50 feet with a draft of ten inches, and a carrying capacity of 40 tons. They will ask of our city and citizens the sum of $500; $250 to be paid upon the completion of two round trips between the above places. The trial trip will be made within the month. T. M. Lane will shortly circulate a petition for a subscription. There is no money to be paid until the feasibility of the navigation is demonstrated; our citizens should not withhold the sign manual.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 8, 1878.

A steamboat is plying the waters between this place and Wichita.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 8, 1878.

SPEERS and WALTON are going to name the steamboat the "Arkansas Traveler."

Arkansas City Traveler, May 8, 1878.

The steamboat made a trip to Salt City last Sunday evening without trouble. Becoming too confident, they then endeavored to go on after dark, and stuck on a bar, on which they remained until morning, compelling many of the anxious excursionists to return home on foot.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 8, 1878.

The steamboat made the trip from Salt City to this place in three quarters of an hour last Monday morning--a distance of seven miles.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 8, 1878.

The steamboat, "Arkansas Traveler," made another voyage several miles up the river last Sunday, loaded with excursionists.

Winfield Courier, May 9, 1878.

Saw S. P. Channell yesterday. He says the steamboat runs nicely between Arkansas City and Salt City. Salt will come down of course. He says the steamer took on a new pilot at Salt City, who ran the steamer aground. The piles are being driven for the bridge across to Bolton.

[BEAVER CORRESPONDENT: "LITTLE BEAVER."]

Winfield Courier, May 9, 1878.

We watch the big sandy for the steamboat, and listen for the shrill whistle, but see and hear it not. Suppose they are putting trucks under it to navigate dry places.

The Daily Winfield Courier, Saturday Morning, May 11, 1878.

Arkansas City Item.
Arkansas City has quietly built a steamboat that will carry fifteen tons, and it has made a successful trip to Salt City and return at the lowest stage of water for more than a year, and yet they seem to think this is nothing to what they are to do in the steamboat line when the river is surveyed.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 15, 1878.

That steamboat is a verity; the navigation of the raging Rackensack an assured triumph. The new steamer spoken of two weeks since has been launched at Arkansas City, and made a successful trip from the latter point to Oxford, twenty miles up the river. We are told that the reason the "new and elegant steamer" failed to "come up" to Wichita is because Wichita failed to "come down" to her. Wichita Eagle.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 15, 1878.

MAJOR WM. SLEETH is one of the delegates to the National Presbytery, to be held at Cambridge, Ohio, and is now on his way to that place, with his pockets full of Cowley County wheat and hands full of Travelers and circulars describing this wonderful wheat growing region. His wife and child accompany him. Mrs. Sleeth will remain during the summer, but the Major will return within four weeks, probably by the way of Little Rock, Arkansas, in order to have a talk with the steamboat men of that place.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 15, 1878.

The steamboat carries cord wood and saw logs from a point ten miles up the river to this place. The captain informs us he will make a trip to Wichita in a week or two. When the roads are bad and travel impeded, the boat will be found a very desirable way of shipping goods. It is thought the trip can be made from Wichita to this place, when the water is at an ordinary stage, within twenty-four hours, and with no more risk than with a wagon.

[KANSAS NEWS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, May 22, 1878. Front Page.

Arkansas City has quietly built a steamboat that will carry fifteen tons, and it has made a successful trip to Salt Creek and returned at the lowest stage of water for more than a year. Winfield Courier.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 22, 1878.

The steamboat took a number of excursionists down the Walnut and back Sunday afternoon for 25 cents for the round trip. There is more pretty scenery on the Walnut than most people are aware of, and those that made the trip enjoyed it very much.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 22, 1878.

The steamboat, after making a voyage of twenty-five miles down the Arkansas last week, came up the Walnut River as far as Harmon's ford. A trip will be made to a point about eight miles east of Pawnee Agency in a few days, and a contract entered into on their return for delivering freight at the same place.

Winfield Courier, May 23, 1878.

The steamboat started yesterday for the Pawnee Agency.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 5, 1878.

ANOTHER boat excursion down the Walnut last Sunday.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 5, 1878.

THERE were twenty-seven persons on the steamboat last Tuesday week. They were conveyed to the river in a wagon, and from the ford at Harmon's went to the large island about three miles below the mouth of the Walnut. The trip was enjoyed by all. A. A. Newman and R. A. Houghton unfortunately were tipped from the small row boat into the river while attempting to get on the boat.

Winfield Courier, June 6, 1878.

A gentleman navigated the "Rackensack" from Wichita to Arkansas City in a flatboat recently. It took him two days to make the trip. He brought in two catfish weighing 70 pounds, which he found stranded on a bar, and shot.

Steamboat Travel on the Arkansas River.
Winfield Courier, June 13, 1878.

COMMUNICATED.
ARKANSAS CITY, June 2.
ED. COURIER: Supposing that you would be interested in common with the citizens of Cowley County in an experiment which we have been making with what the K. C. Journal calls a "sorghum pan," to develop the capacity of the Arkansas River for transportation, I send you this brief history of the attempt as far as developed.

Our boat is 16 x 50 feet, our engine 12 horsepower, our draft about ten inches. Our first attempt was up the river; from Arkansas City, the river at a very low stage, we succeeded in finding sufficient channel as far as Salt City ferry, and left the investigation there in good water. But as we desired to know the channel below Arkansas City while the water was low, and we were expecting a rise, we turned down the stream and below the mouth of the Walnut. Our first trip was below the mouth of Grouse into the Indian Territory and about twenty-five miles. We found the river channel, after passing the mouth of the Walnut, a great deal better.

The obstructions or hindrances to navigation, I think, can mainly be set down under three heads. The rocky chutes where rocks on top and underneath have to be avoided, and where the water runs very swiftly. Three of these occur between the mouth of Walnut and Deer Creek, but in all of them the water is amply sufficient to float a light draught boat.

The next difficulty is the crossings where the channel crosses from one side of the river to the other, and in these are the principal difficulties, as the water divides, and you must follow the main body or strike a bar; but I think we found no place that the deepest water in the main channel would not go 15 inches, or sufficient to carry a light draught. These crossings could be greatly improved by a very little aid in turning and directing the current. The only other obstructions are the snags. They are generally in deep water, and sometimes they seem to have piled in together to keep each other company, and the mariner has to do considerable dodging to keep from shaking hands.

As I wrote, we made our first trip 25 miles down, and we felt considerable anxiety as to how our little craft, geared with belt and pulley, would drive us up stream. But when we turned our little engine in against the Arkansas, we soon had our confidence restored. It showed us from the first mile that it had the power and the will to take us back home, and I thought the little fellow kept saying, "Now if you will only make those old belts stand, I'll put you through." We made home in less than a day without any trouble.

Our next trip was 50 miles down the river. We ran 45 miles from 1 o'clock, and the rest next morning. I think the river grows better and the channel deeper as you go down. This trip was made without meeting any difficulties. There is some beautiful scenery as you pass down where the scattering trees stand out on the hill slopes and remind one of the gentlemen parks of merry old England, of which we have read, and a trip up and down is worth taking, for there is certainly some of the fairest country that ever laid out of doors in the possession of the noble red man along the waters of the "Big Sandy."

In conclusion, if we have only taken the initiative step that will make useful the waters of this grand highway that will open the doors to a cheaper transportation and a better market, we have done something. Our reward so far has been laughter; our encouragement nix, but we shall hold out faithful to the end, as we try a freight trip to Pawnee Agency on Tuesday. Yours truly, A. W. [Believe this was Amos Walton.]

Arkansas City Traveler, June 26, 1878.

"OLD AUNT SALLY is good enough for anybody; Old Aunt Sally is good enough for me," is the tune the farmers will sing when "AUNT SALLY" arrives and makes a cash market for wheat. The boat by that name left Little Rock, Arkansas, last week, and is expected here in ten days.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 26, 1878.

Jetties, Locks, or a Canal, Which?
Hon. Thos Ryan is not the only man who thinks there is a future for the Great Arkansas River.

President Grant, in one of his messages, called the attention of Congress to the feasibility and immense importance of rendering the stream navigable and to the practicability of utilizing its waters in a great canal that would successfully and cheaply transfer the entire surplus products of the valley to the headwaters of ship navigation on the Mississippi River. The river might be either successfully "jettied" or "locked," but we think there could be no doubt of the success of a canal. Grant was not only a good President and a great General, but a successful civil engineer, and we believe he knew what he was talking about when he told Congress that there was something in the Great Arkansas River besides catfish, sandbars, and water snakes. Eagle.

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, July 3, 1878.

AUNT SALLY!
Here We Come!
AND YOU CAN'T HEAD US OFF!
A STEAMBOAT
-AT-
ARKANSAS CITY!
LEAVE YOUR SCRUB TOWNS & COME TO THE SEAPORT!
Be Wise Today: 'Tis Madness to Defer!
SANTA FE, COME TICKLE US UNDER THE CHIN.
A GLORIOUS DAY.
For years our people have talked of navigation on the Arkansas River from Little Rock or Fort Smith to this place. The columns of this paper have been freely used by numerous parties in attempting to prove the practicability of running a line of steamboats on the "raging Arkansas," and in these communications statistics from all over the country have been put forth to convince the people that the saving in the cost of transportation was of such magnitude as to justify the outlay of a good round sum in experimenting. The "shovers of the quill" pictured in glowing colors the immense advantages river navigation would give the town, county, and the whole of Southern Kansas--the entire State, we may say, for that which benefits one portion of the State benefits all, directly or indirectly.

Railroads were desirable, it is true, for the building up of a town, and for carrying away the surplus of farm products; but transportation by water was the "consummation devoutly to be wished," as thereby the farmers would be enabled to sell their produce at a nearer and much better market. It has been clearly proved that where one town prospers through the means of a railroad, half a dozen excel it through the advantages possessed in having a water outlet.

In all the efforts of our people to satisfactorily demonstrate that the Arkansas is a navigable stream for boats of light draught, they have met with most bitter opposition and ridicule at times from the towns remote from the river's banks--and even the press from some of the towns have seen fit to hurl lance after lance at the handful of men at the mouth of the Walnut who were struggling for the advancement of the whole country as well as for the good of the city of Arkansas City.

Our citizens have sent representatives to Washington, in order to enlist the sympathies of our Congressional delegates, but until quite recently these Congressmen have displayed a singular apathy in a question of such commercial importance.

They preferred to vote yes on the appropriation bills before that August body, whether it be for draining some man's cow yard in the East, or for building a cordwood landing on the Missouri or Mississippi, but would not try for an appropriation to help the thousands of people who would be benefitted by the improvement of the Arkansas.

One tenth of the useless expenditures on wild cat railroads which have been sanctioned by Congress would put a line of steamers on this river and build all the landings between our city and the mouth of the river. Still those in power remained inactive and apparently disinterested.

Nearly three years ago Messrs. Berkey, now of Salt City, and Wintin built a pine flat boat at this place, loaded it with flour, and started for Little Rock. It was purely a venture, and a private one. Both parties were satisfied that a boat could go down the river with a good load, and they realized that the best way to demonstrate this to the satisfaction of everyone was to make the trip, or trial. It would furthermore serve to draw the attention of the people of Arkansas to the incalculable good to be drawn from the success of those engaged in the work. The boat started in low water, but after the first two or three days little or no trouble was experienced in making the trip.

Well can we remember the Sunday morning when they were advertised to start. The bridge over the Arkansas was crowded with spectators eager to see the first boat from Arkansas City start for the South, and the churches were mainly filled with empty benches.

News from that unassuming flat boat was watched for with as intense interest as though the lives of all on board were in peril. This enterprise was not a success financially, but it was the cause of sending Mr. Samuel Hoyt east the following summer--the Centennial Summer--with instructions to do all in his power to get a boat to come up to this point. Mr. Hoyt went to Ohio, where he purchased a light draught steamboat, and engaged a captain and crew to make the trip.

They steamed down the Ohio and into the Mississippi, the father of rivers, and thence down to the mouth of the Arkansas. Here they experienced considerable trouble with high water, as the engine was not powerful enough to work against the strong current of the Arkansas, but after a delay of several weeks they got as far up as Little Rock, where the boat was abandoned, it having become evident that it was not the right sort of a boat for this river.

The failure of this enterprise was a damper on the spirits of our people, and the enemies of the project crowed louder than ever over our loss. It was considerable of a loss, as the boat cost three thousand dollars, and only sold for three hundred--not to mention the expenses of Mr. Hoyt during the many weeks of his absence.

Not entirely discouraged, however, several parties in this vicinity have been constantly writing to prominent men in Little Rock, in the hopes of reviving the interest in this great project, and our representative in Congress, the Hon. Thomas Ryan, has taken the trouble to work up an appropriation of $30,000 for the purpose of a survey of the river from Little Rock to Wichita--the result of which was, an enterprising and wealthy firm of that city, Messrs. Eisenmayer & Co., together with other gentlemen, exerted themselves in the cause, and chartered a steamboat to make the trip. To do this, quite a sum was made up to protect the boat from loss, and an agent of the firm, Mr. Charles Schierholz, was sent up here to buy old wheat for shipment.

The news that the steamboat "Aunt Sally" had started from Little Rock reached here Tuesday, the 25th of June, and from that time the topic of conversation has been nothing but steamboat. Even now there were many who openly laughed at the idea of a steamboat coming to our city, and considerately informed us that if we held our breath until that boat arrived, it would be a long while ere we breathed.

Those who had been friends to the enterprise hoped on, though hardly daring to express their convictions that their hopes would be realized. "Have you heard anything from the steamboat?" was asked every minute in the day almost, and though the answer was always in the negative, their expectations continued to raise with each passing day.

Last Saturday an Indian brought the startling news that the boat was seen to pass the Osage Agency on Friday, and that it was then past Kaw Agency without a doubt. Still those of little faith ridiculed the possibility of such a thing. Saturday afternoon some even claimed that they heard the whistle of the steamer and everybody was on the qui vive for news. On Sunday morning groups of men could be seen on the houses, with strong field glasses, looking for the tell tale smoke, and at about 9 o'clock, while many were leisurely taking their late Sabbath breakfasts, their ears were startled by a loud, though hoarse, sound in the direction of the river, which men familiar with such sounds instantly recognized as the whistle of a steamboat.

For a space of a minute or two, probably, nothing was heard, when one of the wildest yells that ever ascended to the empyrean rose from all over the town. Everything was confusion, and the men engaged in a mad race for the livery stables, each anxious to secure a conveyance. Soon another and louder whistle from dear old "Aunt Sally" nearly upset everybody within hearing, and the town just cut loose and ran for Harmon's ford, where the great column of smoke told us the precious receptacle was resting.

Excitement! There wasn't a sane person in the crowd of three hundred men, women, and children who went stringing down to the water. Arrived at the ford, we saw the long looked for "Aunt Sally."

There may be nothing wonderful in the appearance of a small river packet, built for the plantation business of the south. Many of the spectators on that Sunday morning have seen some of the handsomest crafts that ever rested on water; have spent days and nights in those magnificent vessels that sail in the great chain of northern lakes, and have crossed the mighty ocean, the while taking their ease in the most superb staterooms that can be fitted up for the convenience of mortals; but we seriously doubt if any of them ever experienced so much pleasure as they did when they gazed on the form of "Aunt Sally," and realized that the navigation of the Arkansas River was no longer problematical, but an accomplished fact.

Cheer after cheer rent the air, and the crew of eight that had been first to make this trip were received with open arms. Men, who heretofore had been first to church, forgot that this was the Lord's day, and that the preacher stood in the pulpit waiting to break the bread of life to their hungry souls. For once their spiritual appetites were appeased, and for fear that gnawing sensation, peculiar to famishing souls, would assert itself before they were through with the hand shaking, several buggies were supplied with enough "spirits" to revive the fainting ones. This was a better sermon to the lost of our community than was ever thundered from any pulpit in the land, and one whose effect would be lasting.

After an hour of talking with the river men, everybody was invited on board, and in a few minutes we were placidly gliding along the smooth surface of our beautiful Walnut River. And just imagine our sensations! We felt deliciously; felt as if "our back was buttered, and a convoy of angels, with rainbow-tinted wings, were pouring golden syrup upon our head until it trickled down even into our brogans;" or as if we had been intended for peach marmalade and spoiled in the cooking. Thrills of ecstasying joy coursed through our system like a two-year-old goat going uphill. We felt as though we had been let loose at a picnic dinner before anybody else was in sight. Felt better than after a Saturday night with Col. Bennett, Capt. Leach, and Evarts, the Secretary. In fact, we were felled, stunned, overwhelmed, and dum-fuzzled.

We wanted to see the man who said our river wasn't navigable, and then wanted to see him slapped into a straight-jacket for lunacy. We wanted to see him kicked by a jackass, though we were willing to let the contract out to someone else. We wanted--pshaw! We didn't want anything, only to be let severely alone, that we might contemplate upon the future of Arkansas City, that sits on a hill, and from her throne of beauty is yet destined to rule the commercial world of Southern Kansas.

Glancing down the vista of time, and gazing into the now almost certain future, we saw a glorious fulfillment of the promises made in our emigration circulars, and felt that though we had fought for this for years, and against home opposition, too, still we were blessed beyond our desserts. Time and again had our faith weakened, and in despairing tones, we could cry out, "How long, O Lord, how long?" and then we would read a few kind and friendly (!) notices in the Winfield, El Dorado, and Wichita papers relative to a tub at Arkansas City that could float on a heavy dew.

But "he laughs best who laughs last." Sneak into your holes, you insignificant, twinkling, inland towns, and never dare to stand in the broad, effulgent rays sent forth by a seaport city. Yes, pull your holes in after you, and leave not a trace of your miserable hamlets on the face of the earth. To fetch your metropolitan sportsman down here, and ere he returns he can "a tale unfold that will harrow up your soul, and make each individual hair stand up like quills upon the fretful porcupine." Then come down yourself and you will go back firm in the belief that "verily, the half had not been told," you will feel like pulling the "blue gingham apron of the sky" over your pale, dim little phizzes and keeping dark. The supply of greens will even fail, and the dilapidated carcass of the old woman with a case knife will breathe her last in one of your mud puddles, and rolling up her eyes like a dying duck in a thunderstorm, will pass o'er the jasper sea, and her history and yours will be as a tale that is told.

After the trip in the morning, the gentlemen connected with the boat, viz: Captains Barker and Lewis, proprietors; Messrs. Chapman and Smith, pilots; Mr. Colton, citizen of Little Rock, and Mr. Baird were driven uptown, and the crowd stopping at Schiffbauer's store, the doors were thrown open, and they filed in to partake of--well, there was a general good feeling pervading the people, and they did justice to all that was handed out. By this time the hotel man warned them that it was time for attending to the "solids" required by the inner man, and they repaired to the Central Avenue, the guests of Mr. Chas. Schiffbauer, who sustained the reputation for liberality that this firm has gained.

In the afternoon the country people poured in from all quarters, as the news spread like wild fire that the steamboat was here, and that an excursion would be given at four o'clock.

At the appointed time the banks on either side of the river were lined with those anxious for a trip on the first steamboat that ever came up to Arkansas City.

At five o'clock the boat shoved off, with three hundred and seventeen persons aboard, and gave them a delightful voyage, while our brass band favored them with some of the finest music they had. Truly it was a pleasant sight, and an occasion long to be remembered by the participants.

The day ended as quietly as it had begun, and with the exception that the people were gathered in groups, earnestly discussing the pros and cons of the case, no one would have supposed anything unusual had occurred.

And now for the boat and the trip from Little Rock. The "Aunt Sally" (God bless her!) is a regular river packet heretofore plying between Perryville, Arkansas, and Little Rock, carrying cotton mostly. Her length is 85 feet, width 18 feet, and she draws 12 inches light and 18 inches loaded. At the registering office at Memphis she is registered at a capacity of 65 tons. She is owned by Captains Barker and Lewis, both of whom are river men of large experience. They left Little Rock on Tuesday, 18th inst., and reached Ft. Smith the Friday following, a distance of 280 or 300 miles. Left Ft. Smith on Friday, the 21st, and reached this place Sunday morning, the 31st of June, though they could have been here Saturday night as well. The report of every man on board the boat is that they had no difficulty in coming up, and they were surprised a steamer had not been up here years ago. The current is strong and swift, but with a boat built especially for a trade with this part of the country, they could make a round trip in eighteen days. In coming from Ft. Smith here they ran but 107 hours, and estimate the distance at about 450 or 500 miles.

The plan in navigating this river is to run a line of barges. A solid, compact boat, with a powerful engine, could make a fortune soon in plying between this point and Little Rock. The fact is self-evident, yet a few figures may not be uninteresting. The pine flooring which our people buy costs but $15 per thousand in Little Rock, and we have to pay $60 for the same quality at Wichita. Pressed hay cannot be bought there for less than $15 or $18 per ton, while we can lay it down at the wharf here for $5. Corn is worth 60 cents per bushel there, and in two months you can buy all you want for fifteen cents per bushel. Again, the towns around here and the agencies south of us in the Territory create a demand for an immense amount of groceries, etc., which trade Little Rock may as well have as to let St. Louis have it, while the saving in freight would buy a boat or two in a little while.

But there is no need of enlarging upon the benefits from an outlet by water. The people must see it in this light, and ere long we shall see a regular line of steamers plying between Little Rock and Arkansas City. Amen.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 3, 1878.

The fast "flat" WICHITA loosed her moorings at island No. three, last Saturday after-noon, headed for Arkansas City, sailing master, Finely Ross; steer, who had the rudder hung for the occasion, Tom Woodman; cook, W. D. Russell; cabin passengers, Will Woodman, Capt. Cornell, and several others.

This boat will touch all the intermediate points and probably some others not in her shipping log. We hope she will never meet with the mishap that will compel her master to order the helm hard too, on account of the cooks being taken short, on provision, or the order issued to throw out her grappling irons and take reef around the cook's shirt tail. Beacon.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 3, 1878.

SALT CITY, June 20, 1878.
Commodore Berkey made another successful voyage down the raging Arkansas, with less water than Columbus started to sail on. His boat was launched at the post called Oxford, and we are informed they took a load of fruit and lumber to Salt City. His enterprise and perseverance as a navigator is commendable to all. BILLY BARLOW.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 3, 1878.

KANSAS CITY shipped 100,000 bushels of corn to St. Louis, last week, on the first line of barges run between those two cities. Barge navigation on the Missouri River promises to be a success, and will result in making Kansas City the city of the West--that is, until a line of steamers is established between this point and Little Rock.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 3, 1878.

The boat that came up from Arkansas City, last Wednesday evening, attracting the citizens of the city almost unanimously, to the foot of the long bridge, was propelled by a belt and windlass. Her apparatus broke when near here, and the Captain hove to for the purpose of repairs. He said he came here to get shafting. Beacon.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 3, 1878.

Aunt Sally will take your wheat, and H. Godehard will sell you groceries at bed rock prices. Remember this.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 3, 1878.

THINGS WERE LIVELY on the Walnut soon after the arrival of the steamer "Aunt Sally" on Sunday, but nothing compared with the rush to Schiffbauer Bros. & Co. after the arrival of their caravan of new goods.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 3, 1878.

TOM. CALLAHAN gazed in speechless astonishment for fifteen minutes at the steamer, "Aunt Sally," and then finding his tongue he burst out with, "Be Jasus, I can sell me hogs at me own door now."

Arkansas City Traveler, July 3, 1878.

YOU TRAVELER man: Send us up your steamboat, now you have a chance. We want to look at the thing. Eldorado Press.

Couldn't think of it for a moment. There isn't business enough up there to justify the proprietors in making the trip. But come down and see the Little Rock steamer, and then prepare to move your hamlets down here at the head of navigation.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 3, 1878.

JULY 4, 1878.
STEAMBOAT EXCURSION.
THE STEAMER AUNT SALLY
Will run between
HARMON'S FORD
AND THE
PICNIC
GROUNDS
The entire day tomorrow. We expect people from every town in Cowley and Sumner counties. Let everybody turn out and see the first Steamboat ever in this country. The

BRASS BAND
Will furnish music for the occasion.
Winfield Courier, July 4, 1878.

A Threatened Famine.
C. A. Bliss, G. S. Manser, A. B. Lemmon, E. P. Kinne, J. C. Fuller, M. L. Read, T. R. Bryan, W. M. Allison, J. W. Curns, C. C. Black, D. A. Millington, E. S. Bliss, E. S. Torrance, A. E. Baird, J. B. Lynn, M. G. Troup, M. L. Robinson, J. C. McMullen, E. C. Manning, and probably many others, all with their wives, will make a raid upon Arkansas City, the steam boats, and Newman's dam on the Fourth. They will seize all the provisions they can find in the city, capture both the "Aunt Sally" and the--the--well, Amos' steamship, will rip out Newman's dam, and steam up the Walnut to Winfield, driving a large herd of catfish. Bliss and Harter & Harris will load the steamers with flour at their mills. The party will start at about 9 o'clock a.m.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 10, 1878.

A STEAMBOAT FROM LITTLE ROCK.
Arrives at Arkansas City.
A Spicy Letter from the Hon. James Christian,
Who Tells All About It.
ARKANSAS CITY, June 30, 1878.
FRIEND MURDOCK: The steamer "Aunt Sally," from Little Rock, arrived this morning. Our town is mad with excitement. Men, women, and children, some on foot, some on horseback, others in buggies and wagons, rushed "pell mell" for Harmon's Ford on the Walnut, to witness a sight that our people have thought of, dreamed of, and prayed for the last six or seven years: a real, living, breathing steamboat; as the children sometimes say, "a sure enough steamboat."

There she was, puffing and blowing like a thing of life. Some two hundred people rushed on board and examined her all over, from deck to Texas--cabin, engine, boiler, water wheel--all were scrutinized. They were in her and all over her.

Steam being up, the captain invited all hands to a ride up the Walnut as far as Newman's mill and back. The bank was lined with people and the yells and cheers of those on deck and those on shore made the welkin ring. It was hip!--rip!--huzzah!--one after another. A general good time was had.

In the afternoon three hundred persons went aboard by invitation, for a ride down the river. Our cornet band did their best tooting on the occasion. Everything was hilarity and joy.

Little preaching was heard in Arkansas City today, you may depend. "Aunt Sally" was in everybody's mouth.

She will stay until after the 4th, and will try to get up and see Wichita, if possible. The boat is owned by Captains Burke and Lewis, of Little Rock; is 85 feet long, 18 feet wide, and draws 14 inches light, and about two feet when fully loaded; carries 40 tons; made the run from Ft. Smith to this place in six days; met with no difficulty or obstructions on the way; the pilot thinks the river even better above than below Ft. Smith.

At this stage of water a railroad is nowhere alongside of a steamboat. Hurrah for the navigation of the Arkansas! It is no longer a matter of speculation, but is now a fixed fact--a reality. The "Aunt Sally," the pioneer steamer of this great Southwestern river, has proved it. JAMES CHRISTIAN.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 10, 1878.

The receipts of the steamboat excursion on the Fourth amounted to $160.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 10, 1878.

We will have extra sheets again this week, containing Judge Christian's account of the steamboat, as published in the Wichita Eagle.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 10, 1878.

STEAMBOAT MEETING.
Farmers and all interested in the steamboat question are requested to attend a meeting in Pearson's Hall, next Saturday, at 3 p.m.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 10, 1878.

The Telegram last week spoke handsomely of our steamboat and of the benefits which river navigation would give to the entire county. Allison is always foremost in speaking for the good of Cowley. Now we would like to hear from the Courier man.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 10, 1878.

A paper was drawn up and signed by all the principal businessmen in town, last Monday, the tenor of which was an expression of thanks to Messrs. Eisenmayer & Co., of Little Rock, Arkansas, for the interest they had taken in the navigation of the Arkansas River.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 10, 1878.

A FAIR OFFER.
Messrs. Seymour and McClaskey say that if the town will buy the ferryboat west of town, they will put a 20-horsepower engine on it, and take a load of wheat to Little Rock. Mr. Henry Pruden also makes a good offer: He would buy this boat and the one at Salt City, and putting 1,200 bushels of wheat on the two, take the load down to Little Rock. Here he would sell the barges for what he could get, and only ask the town to pay the deficiency, as they are worth much less there than here.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 10, 1878.

The steamboat men desired us to express their thanks to the unknown person or persons who supplied them with that bountiful dinner on the Fourth. They were loud in the praise of Kansas hospitality, and declare they were never treated better in their lives than during their stay in Arkansas City.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 10, 1878.

The editor of the El Dorado Press says that "a little steamboat capable of carrying ten tons penetrated the sand of the Arkansas" as far as this place. There wasn't any sand penetrating done, Mister. That isn't the kind of a steamboat we have down here--and then you missed your guess on the tonnage amazingly.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 10, 1878.

The steamboat started for Little Rock last Saturday, and the captain thinks they can make the trip in seven days, without trouble. Hon. C. R. Mitchell and Mr. Harter went as passengers, the former to represent Arkansas City, and the latter to look after the interests of his mills in Winfield.

Winfield Courier, July 11, 1878.

That Trip on the Aunt Sally."
We "let off" our surplus patriotism on the Fourth by going to Arkansas City and taking a ride on the "Aunt Sally" beneath the classic shades of the "raging Walnut." The said "Aunt Sally" is not exactly like the Sound steamers that ply between Fall River and New York. We did not see the elegant staterooms, dining-hall, furniture, and such; but she paddled along just as well as though arrayed in gay plumage. The passengers stood up on deck and sweltered in the heat; taking two or three small showers for variety; then the whistle made most unearthly screams and the band played patriotic airs. The boat was manned by Channell, Sleeth, Swarts, Farrar, Mowry, and many others of the old sailors of Arkansas City. Many Winfield ladies and gentlemen were on board with us, exhibiting more enthusiasm, we thought, than did our "seaport" friends. When we returned to the landing, Bonsall was on hand with his camera to take a picture of the boat and its passengers, but we shall never believe he got a good picture until he furnishes us with a copy. When that infernal whistle shrieked, it was with difficulty that we prevented our unsophisticated Winfielders from following the example of the Indians down the river by jumping off and wading ashore. Troup jumped about 18 feet, Harris 14, Baird 12, Bliss 10, McMullen & Lemmon 3, Hudson 2. The rest of them were on the other side of the boat and we were not able to record their feats of ground and lofty tumbling.

NAVIGATION OF THE RACKENSACK.
The Steamers Arkansas Traveler and Aunt Sally Have Solved the Question.
Arkansas City to be the Great Port of Entry to Southern Kansas.
BRING ON YOUR WHEAT.
Winfield Courier, July 11, 1878.

The "Arkansas Traveler" navigated by Messrs. Speers and Walton have demonstrated that the Arkansas River from the Pawnee Agency to Oxford is navigable for steamboats, and the "Aunt Sally" has removed all doubt from that part of the river from Pawnee Agency to Fort Smith. Boats of 150 tons burden and two feet draft can run all the way from New Orleans to Arkansas City for a part of the year without doubt.

The "Aunt Sally" is not one of the lightest draft boats. It draws about 14 inches light and 20 inches loaded. It is an old clumsy concern of very little value and was chosen to make the trial trip because if it should succeed in getting up the river and fail to get back, its loss would scarcely be felt. Its owners have a much larger boat that draws less water which they will now send up for a load. Other boats will follow and the present outlook is that a great deal of wheat is to be shipped from Arkansas City this year.

If this commerce proves to be what is promised, it will be a "great thing" for Cowley County; even if boats can run only three or four months in a year, it will be a great help. Twenty boats, each carrying 5,000 bushels of wheat to a trip, and each making fifteen trips in a year, would carry off our surplus crop and bring up our heavy groceries, lumber, and machinery, at a total saving of not less than $200,000 a year to our farmers.

If this proves a success, it will be due to our enterprising friends at Arkansas City who have struggled and labored, and spent their money freely for years to accomplish this result and they will justly reap the advantages of a large trade and an extraordinary impetus to the growth and importance of their town. We heartily congratulate them on their present flattering prospects and would gladly aid them by any means in our power, not only for themselves but for the benefit it will be to the whole county. Three cheers for Arkansas City!

Arkansas City Traveler, July 17, 1878.

STEAMBOAT NAVIGATION up the Arkansas River is the great cause of good quality and great bargains at Hoyt & Speers' Athletic Grocery. Down we come, passing bed rock to Little Rock prices. 5 lbs. coffee for one dollar; 4 lbs. tea, $1; 18 bars of soap, $1; 13 lbs. soda, $1; fruit jars almost at your own price. From this time we are in hopes to get our goods direct from St. Louis and Little Rock, via steamboat up the Arkansas River, which will enable us to start a wholesale house for the benefit of smaller towns in our county, such as Winfield, Maple City, Thomasville, Salt City, Webb Center, etc.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 17, 1878.

The Pruden boys take 700 bushels of wheat down the river this morning on the barge.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 17, 1878.

MR. O. J. PALMER will go down the river with the Pruden boys on the flat boat.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 17, 1878.

THE PRUDEN BROTHERS, of Salt City, have loaded the boat formerly used as a ferry west of town, and intend taking their wheat down to Little Rock, if it can be done by mortal hands. Success to you, boys.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 17, 1878.

When the navigation of the Arkansas River is a settled thing, and grain is regularly shipped by boats or barges, it will cost less than one-half to ship wheat to New Orleans than it costs to ship it to Kansas City from Wichita by rail.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 17, 1878.

The parties who are circulating the report that "Aunt Sally" stuck in the Arkansas, on the morning of her return, would do better to confine themselves strictly to the truth. It was not in the Arkansas, but on the bar at the "cut-off," the worst place between here and Little Rock, that the boat stuck; and this can be avoided when the parties are more familiar with the river. Come, gentlemen, give the old man a chance, and throw your cold water on our heated citizens. They need it worse than the steamboat enterprise.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 17, 1878.

New wheat only 55 cents at Wichita. Twenty cents off for freighting leaves the farmers of Cowley County only 35 cents per bushel for their crops this year, if they intend feeding the railroad magnates. Your only alternative is to unite on some steamboat project, and put your grain down south. No farmer can raise wheat and make a living by selling it at fifty cents.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 17, 1878.

BOLTON TOWNSHIP, JULY 14, 1878.
At a meeting held at the Bland schoolhouse, July 13, for the purpose of making arrangements with D. B. Hartsock to carry our produce down the Arkansas River to Little Rock, Capt. R. Hoffmaster was called to the chair, and A. H. Buckwalter was chosen Secretary.

On motion the following six men were appointed to solicit subscriptions in aiding Mr. Hartsock in building a boat: E. Bowen, Lyman Herrick, G. O. Herbert, W. Chambers, Frank Lorry, and Wm. Trimble. Moved and seconded that the proceedings of this meeting be published in the TRAVELER. R. HOFFMASTER, Chairman.

A. H. BUCKWALTER, Secretary.

In connection with the above, we will state that Mr. Hartsock's plan is to raise money on the wheat solicited from the farmers, and then build or purchase a steamboat at Little Rock, or some other river town where boat building is carried on. Mr. Hartsock is a river man of large experience, having spent most of his life on the water, and if successful in raising the wheat, he will put a boat on this river as soon as one can be built. It will pay our farmers to contribute liberally to this enterprise, as they can more than save the amount of their donations in the price they will get for their grain shipped south. As we said last week, the surest means of success is in unity of action, and the farmers cannot do better than to join in advancing this project. Mr. Hartsock is a thoroughly reliable, honest, and upright man, and has only taken hold of this at the earnest solicitation of numerous friends in Bolton Township, who are alive to the necessity of a water outlet for their grain, and he proves his confidence in the practicability of the scheme from the fact that he puts all his own wheat (the product of a hundred acres) in with the rest.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 24, 1878.

AL. PRUDEN left the flat boat at the mouth of Deer Creek last Thursday noon, and returned home by wagon. He reports the boys are all in good spirits, and having better success every day.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 24, 1878.

A couple of bold navigators passed down the raging Arkansas last Sunday, bound for Little Rock, and hailing from Dodge City.

[BEAVER CORRESPONDENT: "HORATIUS."]

Winfield Courier, July 25, 1878.

As we have survived another celebration of the day of our National Independence, and the delightful excursion on the "Aunt Sally" on the bosom of the placid Walnut on the 4th, and not perceiving anything special in your columns from this locality since my previous communication of three or four weeks ago, I once more endeavor to note the casualties and progress of this vicinity. Before I proceed any further, allow me to interpose an apology for irregular correspondence, viz: the pressure of business makes it almost impossible for your humble servant to find sufficient time to keep you informed in regard to the doings of this vicinity.

It is unnecessary for me to expatiate on the celebration of the 4th and the steamboat excursion, as the COURIER was strongly represented on that occasion. Our good people enjoyed the steamboat ride with great pleasure and satisfaction, and wish the enterprising people of Arkansas City success in their efforts to make the river navigable.

Winfield Courier, July 25, 1878.

I. H. Bonsall made a good picture of the "Aunt Sally" and her living load of freight, notwithstanding the fact that neither the boat nor the people would hold still a moment. He has our thanks for two copies. Bonsall is one of the finest artists in the state.

Winfield Courier, July 25, 1878.

Navigation.
Henry Pruden and O. J. Palmer started from Salt City down the Arkansas River with 700 bushels of wheat in their boat last week Wednesday. The farmers in that vicinity intend to ship their wheat in that way. David Maricle says he intends to ship the proceeds of his 700 acres of wheat on flat boats.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 31, 1878.

Hon. C. R. Mitchell returned from Little Rock last Friday night, after an absence of about twenty days. It will be remembered that Mr. Mitchell went down the river on the "Aunt Sally," in company with Mr. Harter, of Winfield, to talk up the navigation of the Arkansas with the businessmen of Little Rock, and see what could be done in the way of putting a line of boats on the river between Arkansas City and Little Rock.

On Saturday morning a meeting was called at Pearson's hall to hear his report, and the house was crowded to its utmost capacity.

Mr. Mitchell stated that they found low water among the islands at the mouth of the Salt Fork, and down in the Creek Nation, but that the greatest difficulty in finding a channel lay in the fact that the water was constantly falling, which made it impossible to tell exactly where to go. This is the case in any river where there are sand bars, or where the channel is liable to change. Even below Little Rock, after a rise the boats either wait until the water falls to its natural stage before attempting a trip, or are careful to sound the entire way in order to avoid the bars, as there are numerous "shoots" or false channels created by the water during its fall. Mr. Mitchell further reports that with but little improvement, the river above Fort Gibson is better than below it, except probably in extreme low water, and is navigable the greater portion of the year.

By a system of jetties, the difficulties at the Salt Fork and in the Creek country could be removed with but very little cost, when the river from Arkansas City to Little Rock would furnish better facilities for navigation than the lower portion of the river does.

Arriving at Little Rock, Mr. Mitchell conversed with the businessmen of that place, prominent among whom are C. F. Penzel, Eisenmayer & Co., W. B. Cotton, M. D. Pritchard, Charter & Pfeiffer, and Mr. Geyer. These gentlemen all express a willingness and determination to push the matter, and will invest money in boats next year. Mr. Penzel is a generous, public-spirited man, and will put a thousand dollars in the enterprise, satisfied that the "up-river trade" will be an immense thing for that country. Our wheat will bring from ninety cents to $1.10 per bushel, instead of only seventy-five cents, as has been reported. It is far superior to Texas wheat, the latter being dried and shriveled.

Mr. Mitchell then interviewed the steamboat men with reference to coming up here, but found none willing to make the trip this year, for fear of losing the cotton trade, which commences in September, and furnishes a large business to boats during the winter months. Below will be found a list of boats, whose owners intend sending up in the spring.

In the first place Capt. Lewis says he will be the first one up here, bringing the "Aunt Sally." As our readers are familiar with the boat, no description of it is necessary.

The "Rose City," James Bowlin, captain and owner, is 130 feet long, 30 feet beam; cylinders, 10 in. in diameter and 36 in. stroke; boilers 18 ft. long, 3-1/2 ft. in diameter; draws 10 in. light; will carry 100 tons on 18 in. of water, and 150 tons on 20 inches. Her registered capacity is 250 tons.

The "Big Rock," Captains Brodie and Hattaway, is 119 ft. long, 25 ft. beam; cylinders 9 in. in diameter, 30 in. stroke; boilers 18 ft. long, 38 in. diameter; allowable pressure of steam, 140 pounds; wheel 9 ft. in diameter, 16-1/2 ft. long; Registered 180 tons.

The "Fletcher" is a regular packet plying between Little Rock and Fort Smith, is 135 feet long, 34 ft. beam, and has the strongest power of any boat on this river.

The owners of the above boat have assured Mr. Mitchell that they will positively come up in the spring. In addition to these, a Mr. John Darrow intends sending two or three small boats up, he owning a complete line of them.

Mr. Mitchell then went to St. Louis, to obtain estimates in boat building, and found that many river men of that city were manifesting considerable interest in this project, and who propose sending boats next spring.

In conclusion, we would say that C. R. Mitchell has done all that any man could under the same circumstances. To the objections urged by some, that he knew nothing about the river, we answer that his ignorance was more than equaled by his determination to find out, as is proved by his stripping, and wading the river when they were in search of deeper water. To the slurs and accusations of others, to the effect that he was "bought off," we make no reply, other than they are beneath the notice of a man, and have no weight among the better class of citizens.

Winfield Courier, August 1, 1878.

Navigation of the Arkansas.
L. C. Harter returned from Little Rock last Saturday evening. We have since interviewed him and now give his account of the trip.

He went from Arkansas City to Little Rock down the Arkansas River on the "Aunt Sally" in twelve days. Some three or four days of this time was spent in laying up and delays which were not necessary had the boat desired to make the trip in as short a time as possible.

The boat went down without any load because the captain had doubts about being able to get through with any loading. The channel was very erratic and difficult to trace. Many times in following what appeared to be the main channel, the boat traced the windings until it ran onto the sand in water not more than six or eight inches deep. They then had to work off and return upstream until they found a better "shute." In each case, however, they succeeded in finding a passage with at least 20 inches of water. The mode of hunting for the best channel was by getting off the boat and wading. Mr. Harter relates some of his exploits in that line.

He thinks the main difficulties of taking down a load at this stage of the water are the snags, which are somewhat dangerous. The sand is not very troublesome, for when they run on a bar they usually work off by the use of the cable and wheel in 15 or 20 minutes. He thinks that if the stage of water was still lower, the channel would be better, more distinctly marked, and much more easily traced than it was when he went down.

The "Aunt Sally" did not come up early enough. Had she come up two weeks earlier, she might have returned with a good load. She is far from being the kind of a boat that should come up here. She draws too much water and is in other ways unsuitable.

Mr. Harter thinks that a boat constructed like one he saw on the river named the "Big Rock" would be much better. It is about 120 feet long and wide in proportion, with engine and machinery on the bottom. He believes such a boat could run up to Arkansas City and take good loads both ways for three or four months in the year. It will draw 10 ½ inches light and 18 inches loaded. At present it would be difficult to get boats of that class to come up to Arkansas City, were the stage of water ever so good, because they are engaged in the cotton trade on the river below.

After awhile the large boats will be up and take this trade from them; and then if the stage of water is right, they will doubtless be glad to come up. Mr. Harter is of the opinion that a steamer of the class he speaks of as the best for this trade could tow six or seven barges, each loaded with about 30 tons, and at the same time carry 50 tons itself.

He says that the Little Rock millers and some steamboat men estimated that a stock company with $14,000 capital could get up and run such a fleet and make it pay. To insure business and interest in the project, they would require that one-third of the stock should be taken in this vicinity; and if that was done, they would venture the other two-thirds. The Little Rock millers will agree to take all the wheat that such a fleet can bring down at ten cents a bushel higher prices than is paid at St. Louis at the same time. If the fleet could make six trips a year, it could take off half a million bushels. Should it only take 300,000 bushels, it would be wonderful help to the farmers of Cowley. The present price of wheat at Little Rock is 95 cents; corn, 65 cents.

Mr. Harter fears that Pruden's flat-boat will not get through and that they will suffer loss. He thinks it would be safer to load a flat-boat with flour because if they should get stuck, there is a market for flour at various places all the way down, the flour could be readily removed from the boat at almost any place and sold, while wheat would be a loss.

Mr. Harter returned by railroad via St. Louis. He is enthusiastic for river navigation and thinks it will be made a success.

[CORRESPONDENT FROM BETHEL: "ORLANDO."]

Winfield Courier, August 1, 1878.

BETHEL, KANSAS, July 29th, 1878.
Mr. John Anderson, Captain Barker, Peter Paugh, and Mr. Lyons, four of Bethel's most substantial farmers, visited the seaport town of Arkansas City last week to see what arrangements they could make to ship their wheat down the Arkansas River. They went on board the steamboat to interview the captain. They talked and discussed such subjects as finding Symme's Hole and uniting the Atlantic with the Pacific ocean by cutting a canal through the Isthmus of Panama. Our farmer friends finally ventured to ask the captain if he expected to run a steamer between Arkansas City and Little Rock; and if so, what he would load with. The captain said he would, perhaps, load with sugar and molasses seed. The boys left that steamboat sadder if not wiser men. ORLANDO.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 7, 1878.

The people interested should see to it that a boat is put on this river before Congress meets and kept on it while Congress is in session, as this would insure an appropriation of half a million dollars for the improvement of the Arkansas from Gibson or Little Rock to Wichita.

From Hon. Thomas Ryan we learn that the entire Southern delegation in Congress is working for the opening up of the Arkansas River. They realize the magnitude of the trade that will spring up with the success of this project, and they stood by Mr. Ryan to a man in his efforts to secure the appropriation for the survey, which will commence next month.

In view of the many improvements made on Western rivers in the last few years, New York has become aroused on the subject, and seeks to hold a great portion of the trade that is going to Southern markets, by deepening the Erie canal twelve feet, and making it absolutely free--so that one can get bills of lading from Chicago to Liverpool through this canal.

The report of the surveying corps will doubtless determine the appropriation, but keeping a boat on the river, plying between our town and the agencies, would have an immense influence for good.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 7, 1878.

Barges on the Arkansas.
The people of Cowley County, Kansas, are excited just now over the recent trip of a steamboat up the Arkansas River to Arkansas City. They want a line of barges established on the Arkansas River, which flows through one of the most productive portions of the State. They believe, and correctly, too, that if they could make the Arkansas River the outlet for the shipment of their surplus crops, it would be worth millions of dollars to the people of that great valley.

[REPORT FROM "ARCANUM"--BEAVER TOWNSHIP.]

Arkansas City Traveler, August 7, 1878.

BEAVER TOWNSHIP, AUGUST 2, 1878.
Our farmers are highly jubilant over the prospects of the successful navigation of the Arkansas River. God speed the time when Cowley will no longer be under obligation to pay tribute to the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe railroad.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 7, 1878.

Navigating the Arkansas.
BOLTON, July 26, 1878.
Now that there has been so much said pro and con, concerning the navigation of the Arkansas River, allow your correspondent to say a few words in favor of navigating the "Big Useless," as some call it.

We have heard it stated frequently since the "Aunt Sally" made the trip that her Captain was paid by the A., T. & S. F. R. R. Co. for reporting the trip up the river a failure, and now we hear the same report again concerning this last boat, now on the river.

Now let us look at this matter squarely in the face and see if there is any reason for believing this report. The managers of the above mentioned railroad have already made the statement that they expected to transport over their road the snug little sum of 3,000,000 bushels of wheat from this section of Kansas. Out of that vast amount, I think it fair to state that Cowley County will furnish 500,000 bushels. Let us now see what the railroad will make on this wheat by shipping it over their road, from Wichita to Kansas City, at 16 cents per bushel, the rate charged. The freight on 500,000 bushels of wheat at 16 cents amounts to the sum of $80,000. Now wouldn't it pay them well to keep all other transportation out of the country, if they can possibly do it? Would $10,000 or $12,000 be any great loss to them, as long as they can secure to themselves such a sum of money as that, by expending so little? It is reasonable enough to suppose that the company did do it, whether they did or not. All reading people believe that the A., T. & S. F. R. R. are keeping out all other railroads. If such is the case, they would try to keep boats from navigating the river. If there is reason in one case, there is in the other.

Now that it has been proven that the river can be navigated, why not navigate it? Why not improve the opportunity? It is because we all have a different idea of navigating the river, or of building the boat. If such is the case, let us put our ideas together, and go ahead and do something. We must act, and act together if we intend to make use of this natural outlet for our produce.

If men of capital will not build a boat, let us do it ourselves. Ten farmers of Bolton Township can build a small boat that will take all the surplus grain away, in the county. If you can't go with the boat, there are plenty of good men who will, and one or two of the farmers can go along and see how the selling is conducted.

Don't let us talk anymore, but let us do something. The river can be made to serve us if we will make it. We have only to reach out our hand and catch the prize, or we can stand off and growl like a dog with a sore head, and discourage all who try to do something.

If men of money can't be induced to invest a dollar, because they think they can't make five hundred percent, on their money, let men of brains, "sand" and wheat, come forward and do it.

Let us hear from the wheat-growers, the ones most interested.

NITRO-GLYCERINE.
Arkansas City Traveler, August 7, 1878.

A BOAT.
MR. L. H. GARDNER received a letter from a Mr. Bacon, of South Frankfort, Michigan, who proposes to bring a boat up this river. The dimensions of the boat are 70 feet keel, 20 feet beam, drawing 9 inches light, and 18 in. loaded.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 14, 1878.

BONSALL has album size photos of the "Aunt Sally," the first steamboat from Little Rock to this place.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 14, 1878.

Since the practical test of the navigation of the Arkansas by Messrs. Speers and Walton, an effort has been made at Wichita to organize a company for the purpose of purchasing a light draught steamboat, the object being to ascertain whether or not the Arkansas River can be made navigable as far up as that city. If it could, there would be millions in it for Wichita.

Winfield Courier, August 15, 1878.

A stock company to build a boat for the Arkansas River is being formed at Arkansas City. This is a move in the right direction and there should be liberal subscriptions and plenty of them at once.

[ANOTHER CARGO OF WHEAT LANDED AT LITTLE ROCK BY FLAT BOAT.]

Arkansas City Traveler, August 21, 1878.

Another Cargo of Wheat Landed at Little Rock
By Flat Boat.
LITTLE ROCK, Aug. 13, 1878.
Editor Traveler:

GENTLEMEN: We arrived here last night, our wheat in fair condition. We made points on the river as follows:

Left Arkansas City, July 16.

Left Kaw Agency, July 20.

Left Ponca Agency, July 27.

Left Pawnee Ferry, July 29.

Left Childers Ferry, Aug. 2.

Left Ft. Gibson, Aug. 5.

Left Ft. Smith, Aug. 9.

Left Van Buren, Aug. 10.

Arrived at Little Rock, August 13.

Wheat at this point is in good demand. We were offered 90 cents for our cargo at Ft. Smith. Sold ours to Mr. Eisenmayer & Co. for 90 cents here in Little Rock. The wheat in this country does not amount to anything. It was all damaged by the heavy rains, and is badly shriveled.

The mills here are anxious to receive wheat. The Rose City Mills are owned by J. W. Austin. He told me this morning, that he would pay St. Louis prices for all the good wheat that could be brought down the river, which is now 95 cents. The wheat that we brought down, if it had been in good condition and clean, would be No. 2 wheat. That is what the Rose City Mills call it; Mr. Eisenmayer says good 3. We had very little trouble with our cargo after we left the mouth of the Salt Fork. There is no sale here for flat boats.

The "Big Rock" is here making short trips down the river. The owners are very anxious to make a trip up the river to Arkansas City. I do not know whether she will make another attempt or not. We have not seen the Captain; we saw J. W. Hathaway, who is half owner and engineer. He wants $300 to guarantee him against loss in case he does not get there. In case he gets there and is able to bring back a load, all he wants is 25 cents per bushel on his cargo, or what he makes in bringing the wheat down. I do not know what they will do. The boat will be back tonight and I will see them both. H. B. P.

Winfield Courier, August 22, 1878.

Item from the Arkansas City Traveler.
The Pruden boys, who left this place some weeks ago on a flat boat loaded with 700 bushels of wheat, arrived at Little Rock last week safe and sound, having experienced but little trouble after leaving the mouth of Salt Fork. The boys deserve credit for their pluck and determined energy in making this venture; and we hope they will realize a good price for their wheat.

A pretty good joke was perpetrated on one of our restaurant managers last week by Col. Manning, who happened in to take supper. Being alone, he engaged in conversation with the lady about the steamboat that lately made the trip from Little Rock, Arkansas, stating:

"You have had a steamboat up the river lately?"

"Yes, a boat called 'Aunt Sally' came up and remained several days. Another one would have been up if it hadn't been for a lawyer up at Winfield by the name of Manning. He came down with $500 and bought them off."

"That was mean."

"Yes, but it's just like him. I've heard of him a long time, and it's just like him."

"Did you ever meet him?"

"Oh, yes. I was introduced to him and his wife when he was down on the boat."

At this juncture the Colonel ran his nose into the coffee for fear of being recognized, and kept silent, when the lady asked:

"Do you live about here?"

"Yes, I live up in Beaver Township, on a farm."

After supper he left, but called at the house again shortly afterwards, where he met two gentlemen that were looking for him. When he came in and was called by name by his friends, the surprise and embarrassment of the lady can better be imagined than described.

[VERNON CORRESPONDENT: "SCREECH OWL."]

Winfield Courier, August 22, 1878.

VERNON, July 19, 1878.
Threshing is on the program. Wheat going from 20 to 28 bushels to the acre. If that don't do about right, I will eat my old hat. We wish those Little Rock merchants would come with their boats and give us seventy-five cents for our wheat, then we would pick up courage enough to put in another crop. SCREECH OWL.

[BARGE LOADED WITH WHEAT FROM A. C. REACHES FT. SMITH.]

Arkansas City Traveler, August 28, 1878.

A New Interest.
On Thursday evening a barge arrived at our wharf loaded with wheat from Arkansas City, Kansas. Arkansas City is situated on the Arkansas River, near or at the mouth of the Walnut Creek, some three hundred miles above this place. The boat was in charge of Messrs. Pruden and Palmer, and the wheat is a part of the cargo purchased for the Aunt Sallie, and left by her, because of some unknown influence, and is being transported down to fill the contract made with Mr. Shearholtz for Eisenmayer & Co., of Little Rock. Mr. Pruden says he started with 650 bushels, and finding shoal water at Ponca Agency he had to store 250 bushels. His boat draws fifteen inches light, but with his load, from Ponca down, he had no trouble. He was on the way since July 16, and laid up six days on the trip.

Much credit is due to the pluck of Messrs. Pruden and Palmer, and they should be encouraged. This trade may prove a valuable one to this section, and the people of that part of Kansas are so anxious to establish it, we should give them all the aid and all the encouragement in our power. We will refer to this subject again. Ft. Smith Herald.

[MORE ABOUT PRUDEN AND PALMER, FLAT BOAT CREW.]

Arkansas City Traveler, August 28, 1878.

H. B. Pruden, O. J. Palmer, and the flat boat crew returned from Little Rock last Saturday. They came to Ft. Smith by steamboat, thence by stage to Muskogee, thence by rail to Independence, thence by private conveyance home.

They say they found no less than three feet of water in the channel all the way down, and that the river from this point to Fort Smith is as deep as from there to Little Rock. It is the opinion of Mr. Pruden that flat-boating is practicable, and will pay if the barges can be brought back.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 11, 1878.

Hank Pruden, an old river navigator, was in town this week.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 18, 1878.

The Oxford folks have made a contract with parties owning a steamboat, to make regular trips from Fort Smith to that place. The contract specifies that the boat shall make regular trips for a year, the projectors to receive a stipulated amount of cash each trip. Wichita Eagle.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 18, 1878.

Pruden's flat-boat sold for $35 at Little Rock.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 18, 1878.

BUILDING STEAMBOAT: SEYMOUR & McCLASKEY, BOLTON.
We are glad to be able once more to chronicle a practical effort to navigate the Arkansas River. Messrs. Seymour and McClaskey, of Bolton Township, while others have been talking, have been quietly at work building a steamboat hull, with a capacity to carry 200 tons of freight. They are now repairing their machinery and will have it ready to put on and move their boat by steam as soon as the hull is completed.

These gentlemen need, and certainly from the practical manner in which they have gone to work, deserve assistance. The hull is solidly constructed of good oak lumber and built by a practical boat builder. It is expected to draw 7 inches of water with her machinery all on board. One boat successfully navigating the river and farewell to high freight tariffs.

Winfield Courier, September 19, 1878.

The Oxford folks have made a contract with parties owning a steamboat to make regular trips from Ft. Smith to that place. The contract specifies that the boat shall make regular trips for a year, the projectors to receive a stipulated amount of cash each trip.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 25, 1878.

Republican Meeting.
Last night a large number of our citizens gathered at the M. E. Church in this city to hear the Hon. Thos. Ryan, our member of Congress and candidate for reelection.

Mr. I. H. Bonsall was elected chairman and E. G. Gray secretary of the meeting, and after music by the brass band, Mr. Ryan was introduced.

After speaking of the Cherokee Strip and Osage Diminished Reserved lands, which he has succeeded in placing in the market and providing easy terms of payment, he dwelt for a few moments on the subject of navigation of the Arkansas River, and says the authorities have promised that a survey should be made before congress assembles. He then passed to a consideration of the financial question, and established himself firmly on the grounds of Western interest. He is in favor of the greenback dollar, and of abolishing the National bank notes, and substituting greenbacks therefor. At the same time he is not to be confounded with the so-called Greenback party, whose scheme, as he terms it, is to repudiate all promises made by the Government. Mr. Ryan's views on all public questions are in sympathy with the masses, the laboring classes, and serve to make him the popular man he is in this district. His reelection is insured by even a larger majority than he had last term.

[COMMUNICATION FROM "I. H. B."--CORRESPONDENT.]

Arkansas City Traveler, September 25, 1878.

Arkansas City, Sept. 23rd, 1878.
Dear Traveler,

In company with R. A. Houghton, Wm. Sleeth, and Jas. Christian, your correspondent paid a flying visit to the ship yard on the west bank of the Arkansas River opposite the town, and there found Cyrus Wilson busily engaged in building a steam boat for John McClaskey and J. H. Seymour. The boat is intended to run between Arkansas City, Cowley County, Kansas, and Little Rock, Arkansas. The boat is a trifle larger than Aunt Sally. The ribs and hull are constructed of good oak lumber and will be a good substantial boat, 85 feet long and 22 feet beam. The hull is 83 feet by 16 feet on the bottom, and 85 feet by 18 feet on the deck, and with the machinery on board, will draw less than eight inches; the bow is not square like the Aunt Sally, but built with a "Model bow." Messrs. McClaskey & Seymour deserve a great deal of credit for rushing this enterprise as they have. Being men of limited means, they have shown true western pluck in taking hold and working out of almost nothing this boat, and the public should give them all the aid in their power to enable them to put on a good and serviceable piece of machinery.

Their intentions are to put on McClaskey's saw mill engine and load the hull with wheat and go to Little Rock and with the proceeds of the sale of the load of wheat purchase two good engines suitable for the work and finish the upper part of the boat down at some saw mill where good pine lumber can be had at reasonable figures.

I think it would be a good plan for the different parties holding wheat notes given to induce boat building to sign them over to Messrs. McClaskey & Seymour to apply to finishing this boat and make sure of having one boat at least on the river this fall.

Most all signing these notes would consent to their transfer to the first boat as that was the object in donating the wheat. Now is the time to push this work on to a successful issue and it should not be allowed to fail for want of means to finish the boat and put on board good powerful engines that will enable them to handle the boat in all stages of water. Bring along your wheat and put this work on a sure basis. I. H. B.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 25, 1878.

Now is the time to hand in your subscriptions to the McClaskey steamboat.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 25, 1878.

The steamboat just being finished by McClaskey & Co. will soon be launched for Little Rock.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 25, 1878.

All parties who signed subscriptions to the Hartsock enterprise would be doing well to transfer them to the McClaskey Steamboat.

Arkansas City Traveler, September 25, 1878.

Mr. John McClaskey is building a steamboat on the Arkansas River west of this place. He deserves considerable credit for his pluck and enterprise in this matter.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 2, 1878.

Railroad versus Steamboat.
Almost every paper that you pick up has something to say on the dull times, the finances, and what will bring about a change for the better.

Almost every locality has its local hobby, to better the condition of the country, and some localities have one advantage and some another.

But let us examine our own selves. Let us view the situation of our own home, Arkansas City and southern Cowley. What are our own wants, and under what disadvantages do we labor? Have we not the best county of land in the State? Have we not as mild and salubrious a climate as any in the United States? Have not our farms produced the most enormous crops of wheat, oats, corn, and vegetables for the past few years? Is forty to fifty bushels of oats to the acre not satisfactory to the farmer? Is twenty to forty bushels of wheat to the acre not sufficient? Is fifty, seventy-five, and one hundred bushels of corn to the acre not enough to compensate for the labor expended? Is it not a fact at this time that our land fairly groans with the weight of produce on hand waiting a purchaser or an outlet to market?

Situated as we are on the southern line of the State on the banks of the Arkansas River, right reason and common sense would dictate that our best hold is down the river by some means, either by flatboat, steamboat, or both combined.

The want of transportation is wasting the abundance of food for the people, keeping our farmers poor with thousands of bushels of grain on hand, while others at a distance are starving for the grain which is wasting on our hands for want of means to get it to market.

It would seem like a work of superogation in this enlightened age to undertake to convince anyone of the cheapness of water transportation over railroad transportation, but we will give one example that must convince the most stupid and pigheaded of its truth.

The British Commercial Reports give the case, showing actual shipments at paying freight rates of one-half million ton per mile.

British Commercial Report No. 10 for 1875, under the title of "Proposed Inland System of Navigation," says:

"As to relative costs of transport by water and railways, an instance is given of a case in point. A Cincinnati steamer with her tows laden with coal from Pittsburgh, was passing down the Ohio river, bound to Orleans, distant from Pittsburgh about 2,000 miles. The cargo consisted of 336,000 bushels of coal weighing 13,440 tons. This coal was being transported to New Orleans at 5 cents per 100. At this very moderate rate the down trip brought to the boat and barges $13,440, considered a remunerative trip by the owners. Now, to have carried such a freight by rail would have demanded a force of fifty trains, or 1,344 cars, with 10 tons each. At $2.00 a car, with 10 tons freight, to be carried 2,000 [which is even lower transportation than can be profitable on the railroads], this cargo would have amounted to $268,000, making a difference of more than $250,000 on the transportation of the cargo by one cheap steamboat and her barges.

Cost by rail: $268,000

Cost by water: $13,440

Gain by water: $254,520

Now, such being the case, what is the duty of the farmers of southern Cowley, Sumner, and Chautauqua counties but to bend all their energies, concentrate all their means to the establishing of a line of boats on our river that will afford us a means of getting all our surplus produce, of whatever description, to market. It is every man's interest! It is every man's duty to contribute what he can towards such an object. Almost an existence depends on it. The price of farm products rise or fall in proportion to the accessibility to a market. Thus corn in Cowley County today is only worth from 12 to 15 cents per bushel, while on the Mississippi River, it is worth from 55 to 65 cents a bushel. Wheat is a drug at home here at 40 cents, while on the Mississippi it is worth 90 cents to $1.25 per bushel. Do you ask the cause? I answer high railroad freights. But, says the farmer, what can I do toward reduction of freights? We cannot build steamboats. No, but you can contribute your quota to help those who are willing to put their means into a boat as an experiment to test the feasibility of river navigation.

Two of your neighbors, Messrs. Seymour & McClaskey, are now building and have on the "ways" a boat 82 feet long and 18 feet wide, built in a neat and substantial manner by a competent boat builder. The material used is good sound white oak lumber, sawed at their own mill. The bottom, sides, ribs, etc., are to be decked with pine, and equipped with a good 20 horsepower engine and boiler temporarily until she can be got to where a more powerful engine and boiler can be procured. These men mean business, they are your neighbors, and have no greater interest in the prosperity of the county than you have, and no more means to spend, yet they are willing to risk their all--you ought to be willing to risk something to help them.

A little from everyone would help these men, and encourage them in their noble enterprise. Will you do it? I doubt not but that you will come up like men with your little 5 or 10 bushels of wheat, or the cash if you prefer it. It is money well spent. It will be like bread cast upon the waters, for thou shalt find it after many days a rich harvest of good.

JAMES CHRISTIAN.
Winfield Courier, October 3, 1878.

The steamboat which is being built at Arkansas City will be launched in a few days when her machinery will be put on board preparatory to a trial trip down the river.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 9, 1878.

Steamboat meetings will be held at several places in the southern part of the county this fall.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 9, 1878.

There is a chance for farmers to get 90 cents per bushel for wheat, and no bonds to be voted, and no election to be held. Donate a few bushels of wheat to load the boat when she goes down.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 9, 1878.

STEAMBOAT.
The steamboat lying west of town is ready for the water as soon as the calking is completed, which will be in the course of three or four days, when she will be launched and started on her trip to Little Rock.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 9, 1878.

OUR STEAMBOAT.
We again call the attention of everybody in the city and country to the fact that the building of the steamboat is progressing steadily, and desire to call particular attention to the fact that these parties deserve such aid as the farmers and city feel that they can give. Farmers desiring to donate wheat can deliver it to Messrs. Schiffbauer Bros. & Co., or to Wm. Speers at the mill--not to be delivered to the parties building the boat until the boat is ready for her first trip. She will be loaded, and her first trip down the river will be an attempt to reach Little Rock with a load of wheat.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 9, 1878.

Steamboat Meeting.
BOLTON, OCTOBER 5TH, 1878.
The meeting was called to order by Capt. Hoffmaster, who was elected chairman, and J. O. Wilkinson, secretary. Amos Walton came forward and explained the object of the meeting in an extended speech, explaining the reason why the Arkansas River has not been navigated ere this. He gave his experience in navigating the river last spring, proving conclusively that the river can be navigated with light draught boats nearly the whole season, and that the channel did not change in the regular chutes at all. He showed by statistics that steamboat transportation is far cheaper than any other kind. He then read a letter from a gentleman now surveying the Kaw River, stating that he intended to survey the Arkansas after he had completed the survey of the former stream. Mr. Walton, continuing, said there was nothing in the politics of any party that was one-tenth the value to the farmers of this county, Bolton in particular, as there was in the successful navigation of this river. He then referred the people to the boat now building by McClaskey and Seymour, and said that those gentlemen had promised him not to ask for any aid from the people until their boat was constructed. That time has now arrived, and he now asked the people to respond according to their own judgment of what was right. Mr. Walton closed his remarks by calling for a general expression of opinions by the members of the meeting.

Captain Hoffmaster was called, and said that he was willing to give all he had donated to the Hartsock enterprise, Mr. Hartsock having given it up. Mr. Herrick came forward and said that he was willing to do the same. All then came forward and turned their donations to the Hartsock fund over to McClaskey and Seymour. Messrs. Herrick, Bowen, Sample, and Conaway were appointed a soliciting committee, when the meeting adjourned, to meet next Saturday night, October 12. R. HOFFMASTER, Chairman.

J. O. WILKINSON, Secretary.

Winfield Courier, October 10, 1878.

VERNON TOWNSHIP, Oct. 1, 1878.
The Freeman Brothers have secured nearly $2,000 in subscriptions in Oxford Township and West Vernon to their proposition to build a tow boat to navigate the Arkansas between Oxford and Little Rock.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 24, 1878.

One thousand people will witness the launching of the new boat now almost completed.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 24, 1878.

Four caulkers at work on the steamboat hull, and in about a week she will ride the waves of the Big Sandy.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 24, 1878.

Donations of grain for the steamboat can be left with Schiffbauer & Co., to be loaded on the boat when she is ready to move.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 24, 1878.

The oakum for corking the new boat has arrived, and the boat will be ready to launch in about a week. Capt. Barnes, an old steamboat captain and pilot, is superintending the job now, and will go down the river with her.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 24, 1878.

Messrs. Seymour & McClaskey are getting their engine ready for the hull of the steamboat, and Little Rock will soon hear the whistle, and Kansas wheat will show in her market.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 31, 1878.

Steamboat Meeting.
The following was intended for publication in last week's issue, but was handed in too late. ED.

BOLTON, Oct. 19, 1878.
The meeting was called to order by Mr. Walton, after which Mr. Mercer was called to the chair and J. O. Wilkinson was chosen secretary. Mr. Walton then came forward, and made a stirring speech in favor of the practical navigation of the Arkansas River. Said that all the people living along the river should be interested in its navigation, and Bolton in particular. The people of Bolton had shown more enthusiasm in the matter than the people of any other township so far. His whole speech was pithy, pointed, and well delivered, and at the close was greeted by a round of applause from the audience.

Mr. Walton then introduced Mr. Barnes, an old river pilot of thirty years' experience, who told them in a brief speech that he had made a trip down the Arkansas, and gave them a practical knowledge of its peculiarities, its drifting channel, chutes, etc. He found that the rocky chutes had a good stage of water in them the greater part of the time. This is in contradiction to what we have heard heretofore in regard to this matter, but he presented it in such a truthful manner the people believed his statement. He further said that there was as good a stage of water from here to Ft. Gibson as from Gibson to Ft. Smith. Mr. Barnes had visited the boat now being built by Messrs. McClaskey and Seymour, and pronounced it good for carrying one thousand bushels of wheat on twenty inches of water, and also said she would take three barges in tow.

His remarks were well received by the meeting, after which committees were appointed and resolutions passed. Messrs. Lorry and Mercer were added to the soliciting committee, and Mr. Lorry was appointed a committee of one to wait on Mr. Hartsock for the purpose of collecting those wheat notes given him (Mr. Hartsock) by the farmers, to aid him in his now abandoned steamboat enterprise.

The following resolutions were then carried unanimously.

Resolved, That the TRAVELER be requested to add its influence in Arkansas City and elsewhere, in aid of the steamboat,

Resolved, That the proceedings of the meeting be published in the Arkansas City TRAVELER. J. O. WILKINSON, Secretary.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 31, 1878. Editorial Page.

We assure our Bolton Township friends, and all interested in the navigation of this river that anything we can do in their behalf, or in furtherance of their enterprise, will be done willingly and cheerfully. Our faith in the ultimate success of this scheme was never stronger, and we believe the day is not far distant when this southern tier of countries will have the best outlet in the State for their produce, and at a saving to them of thousands of dollars in railroad bonds not voted. Next spring and summer will see many boats here from the South, buying our grain at a good round figure, or for a moderate sum ready to float it down to the best of markets, where its superior quality will command the highest prices. The snug, well built craft lying west of town is a monument to the industry and self-denial of the two gentlemen who have risked their little all, and confidently devoted their time and means to the completion of the boat, relying only upon the generosity of their many friends for what assistance is tendered them. If the enterprise is a success (and we earnestly hope it will be), to Messrs. Walton and Speers, no less than to those now laboring on the boat, the people owe a debt of gratitude not easily paid, as they have worked untiringly for the interests of the community.

[APPEAL TO FARMERS TO AID STEAMBOAT BY AMOS WALTON.]

Arkansas City Traveler, October 31, 1878.

Farmers, Why Not?
It has been requested of you that you give some aid to the parties who are giving their best endeavors toward building a steamboat, and determining by a practical test the value of the river running by your doors, for transportation. You will grant the great value to yourselves of the increased and cheaper facilities for getting to a better market. You grant also that if the farmers determine that this enterprise shall have a fair test, it will get it, and requires but a slight aid from each.

Now if these men have thus far, single handed and alone, pushed the matter far enough to satisfy you that they mean business; if they have risked every dollar they have--can you well refuse the necessary assistance toward making it a complete success? The first trip will be the hard one, and the costly one. You should bear your share, for if that is successful, the case is made, and you gain a highway to the sea cheaper for all time than iron rails can carry, and open to all. A. W.

[THE ARKANSAS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, November 6, 1878.

NATHAN HUGHES, PUBLISHER.
For months past our people have agitated the subject of navigation on the Arkansas. In July, as the reader will recall, the Sally made a trip from Little Rock to this point, and demonstrated the fact that something can, and should be done, with steam on our river. True, the Sally dropped down the river without loading, but the policy of another town and the influence of money is the key to the cypher. It is plain to any man with honest convictions and an eye that can see beyond his nose, that the Arkansas can be navigated to this point for months during the year, by the same class of boats that annually ply the Yellowstone. But, says the reader, "It takes money to build boats, and we are all poor people." Grant it, perhaps you are not only poor, but in the worst of all financial conditions, in debt, covered with a cut-throat mortgage, at possibly two percent, a month. Now, most men hope to see better days in the near future! For years you have been toiling, early and late, to lift that mortgage, but yet it remains a terrible tax on your strength. Year after year you have been hauling your crop fifty miles to meet a market too flat to compensate you for the cost of production! After paying your annual expenses together with your interest at two percent, you find that you have not a nickel remaining.

We are very ready to admit this is not the experience of all who may read this article. God forbid that it shall long remain so with any. Is there not a better way than you have been doing in the past? We think there is. Go to your neighbor and talk the matter over. Maybe he is in the same suds as yourself. Call a meeting, get out your best men--men of money if you have them. Make up your mind at the start that it will require patient, earnest labor to accomplish any object worth attaining. Ascertain the exact amount in wheat, cattle, or cash each will contribute to a general pool of funds. Go to another community and with your committee work for this purpose. Soon you will have on hand a fair amount, if not sufficient to build, to purchase something that can run on the river, if no better than the Sally. Make a beginning and others will follow. How long would the waters of the Arkansas run to waste if they passed through California? Little Rock has men of capital, though they seem slow to see the advantages that are sure to accrue to them, as well as us, from this enterprise. Put your boats on the river and you will see Little Rock, Ft. Smith, and other points send up their boats for your produce and pay a good price, almost at your doors.

Can you afford to rest easy and let this subject pass without earnest efforts? No, you cannot. Sober reflection will tell you that just as long as you raise wheat at a cost of 50 cents per bushel and haul it to Wichita and sell it for the same, or less figures, you can never lift that mortgage. One day the money loaner will jog your memory and the sheriff's hammer will knock you out of house and home, and leave you, perhaps in old age, without a shelter on life's pathway to the grave. Work for a better market, work to get out of debt.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 6, 1878.

The Survey of the Arkansas River.
Capt. I. D. McKown, of the U. S. A. Engineer corps, with his assistants, Messrs. Kimball and Davis, are now at the Douglas Avenue Hotel. They will remain here till the latter part of the week to complete their arrangements for the preliminary survey of the Arkansas River from Wichita to Ft. Smith, Arkansas.

The surveying party will consist of five or six persons all told, with two flat boats, 8 x 20 feet, with compartments for sleeping and storage and covered with a canvass awning. Capt. McKown and party have just completed a like survey of the Kaw River from Junction City to Kansas City, and have made a favorable report as to its being made navigable between the above points, a distance of 200 miles. They averaged about seven miles a day on this stream.

The party will leave here on Friday or Saturday and proceed down the river, making an accurate record of distances, the amount and flow of the water, width of the river, height of the banks, amount and quality of the timber, and character of the bed on the river generally.

When completed, a report will be made through Major Suter, of St. Louis, chief engineer of the department, to General Humphreys, at Washington, the head of the Engineer corps.

Out of the general appropriations made by Congress of $20,000 for the survey of the White and St. Francis rivers, in Arkansas, the Gasconade, in Missouri, and the Kaw and Arkansas rivers, a special assignment of $3,000 was made for the survey of the two latter. The people of this part of the Arkansas valley will watch for the report with a great deal of interest. The jetty system is the plan proposed for the opening of these rivers for commercial purposes. Wichita Beacon.

[EDITORIAL: STEAMBOAT.]

NATHAN HUGHES, PUBLISHER.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 13, 1878.

The launching of the first steamboat built at this point took place on the Arkansas directly west of town on Wednesday last. Her hull is 90 feet in length and her width 22 feet. After settling in the water, she drew about five inches. The builders assert that with machinery and fuel, she will carry two thousand bushels of wheat in sixteen inches of water.

This is an enterprise that should command the endorsement of every well-wisher of the land, not simply because of the wheat that she bears to a Southern market, but she will add further proof to the fact that the Arkansas can be navigated as far up as this place and thereby open the way to a line of boats.

We shall say more on this question in the future, but are crowded with "copy" this week.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 13, 1878.

The U. S. Surveying Party.
On Monday morning last Capt. I. D. McKown, employed by the U.S.A. Engineer corps to make the survey of the Arkansas River from this point to Ft. Smith, as provided for by an appropriation in the River and Harbor Bill of the last Congress, arrived in Wichita, bringing with him three assistants for the prosecution of the work. Capt. McKown had just completed the survey of the Kaw River, and made his report to Maj. Sutter, of St. Louis, on the 24th inst., when he was immediately assigned to the survey of our river. The party brought with them the boat used in navigating the tempestuous Kaw, and on Monday a Herald representative boarded the craft, which lay at anchor at the Second street landing, and found the Captain and "crew" laying in a stock of provision for the long voyage before them, over "unknown seas"--or river, at least. Instead of a boat, our reporter found there a "flotilla," which consisted of two fishing boats joined together, laid over with plank and covered with canvas. Within these somewhat contracted quarters, Captain McKown was found. He proved to be a most accommodating and companionable gentleman, and an interesting conversation was enjoyed, at least by the Herald man.

The appropriation for survey of this river is only about $1,200, which Capt. McKown declares to be entirely inadequate to provide for anything like a thorough survey for the river to Ft. Smith.

Nearly $1,500 was expended in the survey of the Kaw for a distance of 109 miles, while the distance on this river to be traversed is at least 350 miles.

Three months will be consumed in the trip from here to Ft. Smith, and the work will consist in taking bearings of the river, sketching the banks, sounding, and ascertaining the fall of the river. This latter will prove difficult, as it is impossible with the money appropriated to run a complete line of levels between Wichita and Ft. Smith. Captain McKown was loath, of course, to express any opinion on the chances of the river being made navigable.

The result of his survey of the Kaw was a report favorable to its being made navigable, and the rivers similar as to character of bed, although the Kaw, of course, has a larger volume of water in its channel.

It will be impossible to dredge the Arkansas, but Captain McKown does not hesitate to say that it is possible to make it navigable by narrowing the channel by a system of dykes, wing dams, and jetties; but whether this is practicable depends, of course, upon the cost of the work, and that will be approximately determined by the present survey.

Mr. Nixon, the County Surveyor, made it his business to show the surveying party every attention and courtesy possible, and to make their stay here pleasant. On Tuesday evening a supper was given at the Douglas Avenue to the party. At the elegant table, spread by mine host, of that hotel, we found seated about twenty-five of the prominent businessmen of the city, together with Capt. McKown and party. Mr. Stanley tendered the hospitalities of the city to the party in a neat little speech, to which Capt. McKown responded in a few words, expressing his appreciation of the compliments extended. After the supper a very pleasant social evening with music and informal exercises was passed in the parlors of the hotel, and the party separated at 11 o'clock with many expressions of satisfaction from the gentlemen of the surveying party, and with many desires from the citizens for a safe trip and bon voyage to the "hardy mariners."

Capt. McKown made one addition to the party here of W. W. Camp, and started upon his expedition Friday morning. Wichita Beacon.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 13, 1878.

The U. S. surveying corps is on the Arkansas and should receive special attention from all who desire improvement of the river.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 13, 1878.

HURRAH for the "Cherokee!" It is the first boat launched on the Arkansas River at this point. Gentlemen, help her to her engines and see her ply on the river.

Winfield Courier, November 14, 1878.

ARKANSAS CITY, Nov. 7, 1878.
EDITOR WINFIELD COURIER: Dear Sir: According to promise I send you an account of the steamboat Cherokee now building at this point.

On Wednesday afternoon, Nov. 6th, the Cherokee was successfully launched and is afloat in the Arkansas River opposite this town ready for the machinery, which will be put on her during the next ten days. McClaskey & Seymour are the owners, and the boat was built by Cyrus Wilson, one of our mechanics and an old experienced boat-builder.

The hull is sixteen feet wide and eighty feet long on the bottom; eight-five feet long and eighteen feet wide on the main deck, with guards projecting two feet all around, making the boat on the main deck twenty-two feet wide and eighty-five feet long, making her four feet wider and several feet longer than the "Aunt Sally," and, having a model bow, she looks more like a steamboat. The hull is built of oak ribs and two inch oak plank on the bottom and two inch pine plank for the sides. Her draught when she went into the water was less than four inches, while empty. After the crowd rushed on board, with ninety men, besides several boys and children not counted, her draught was six and a half inches. That number of men will weigh as much as her machinery; if not more, and her draught will not exceed seven inches. With fuel and all ready for a trip, fifty tons of freight will put her down one foot more, making her draught 19 inches; so that she can carry at least one thousand bushels of wheat on 20 inches. As the river at its lowest stages and on the shallowest bars or fords has never been less than 18 inches to two feet of water, we feel confident that this boat can run ten months of the year and carry at least one thousand bushels of wheat at a trip.

The Arkansas River, once opened for boats, will give Cowley County the best outlet for her surplus crops that we can hope for. If this boat can make one or two successful trips between Little Rock and Cowley County this winter, other boats will follow in the spring, and there will soon be a line of steamboats making regular trips up and down the long neglected Arkansas.

This enterprise, pushed on to a successful issue, farmers will be enabled to sell their wheat in Winfield and Arkansas City at Wichita prices--saving to them the cost of hauling fifty miles to an uncertain market. Cowley County wheat once started down the river, will bring railroads to Cowley County sooner than anything else that we can do. Now the railroads have our trade where they are, without building into the county to hold it, but with navigation fairly established down the Arkansas, they would have to come to the county to secure our trade.

River navigation means to all of Southern Kansas, and especially Cowley and Sumner counties, increased prosperity that a ready market always brings. It means cheaper rates for freight on all we have to sell, and every cent saved on price of freights goes into the pockets of the producer. It also means lower prices on all we consume; in short, higher prices on all we have to sell and lower prices on all we have to buy; thus being a two fold benefit to all.

River navigation has several advantages over railroad lines, as all freight can be carried for less than one-half railroad charges. It cannot be monopolized by any company. No combination can be formed for pooling earnings, and it will give Cowley County cheaper railroad rates, as it will be a check upon any railroads after they do come, and we shall be able to obtain better terms from them than we could possibly hope for if we were entirely at their mercy.

With railroads north and east and the river carrying our crops south, Cowley County will be in a fair position to advance to the front ranks and will soon be able to offer better inducements to turn the tide of immigration to her borders than any other county in the southwest. The time has come when every man in Cowley County should lay aside all personal feelings and local interest and put his shoulder to the wheel and give the county a shove ahead. That will secure to her these much needed facilities for years to come.

Don't let the golden opportunity pass while we stand quarreling over localisms, but let us all work together for the true interest of the whole county.

Most respectfully, I. H. BONSALL.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 20, 1878.

Wheat for the boat can be delivered at Schiffbauer Bros. store.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 20, 1878.

The donation wheat can be delivered on the boat at the bridge Friday and Saturday.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 20, 1878.

It is expected to move the boat below the bridge today where her machinery will be set and she will be ready to move out.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 20, 1878.

Take your donation wheat to the boat Friday and Saturday, below the bridge.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 20, 1878.

The river surveyors under charge of Capt. McKown, have at last made their appearance. Notwithstanding the very low stage of water, the observations show well for the river, and carry out the predictions of the friends of water navigation.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 20, 1878.

Capt. McKown with his party, spent the evening of Monday in a social chat with our citizens. The Captain has been engaged in the survey of many western rivers, and is fully competent for the work assigned him. He says the work must be pushed in order to get the reports into this Congress. He says the river has grown much better since leaving Oxford. The Captain believes in the Jetty system, and is a strong believer in water transportation. He and his company departed Tuesday morning with the sincere well wishes of all our citizens.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 27, 1878.

Farmers who have subscribed wheat for the boat will please bring it forward without delay as the boat is about ready. It can be delivered on the boat below the bridge or at Benedict's store in the city.

Arkansas City Traveler, December 4, 1878.

The boat is loading below the bridge and will leave for below next week.

Arkansas City Traveler, December 4, 1878.

The surveying party report the latitude of Wichita 245 feet greater than this place.

Arkansas City Traveler, December 4, 1878.

The rise in the river has come in good time. The boat will leave for below with a fair load, and we hope will obtain a good price.

Arkansas City Traveler, December 11, 1878.

A complete list of the subscriptions on the boat will be published in our next issue.

Arkansas City Traveler, December 11, 1878.

Amos Walton is thinking of going down the river on the "Cherokee" when she leaves. Better remain at home, Amos, and attend to repairing the south end of the bridge. The people elected you trustee to look after just such business.

Arkansas City Traveler, December 25, 1878.

Capt. Walton and the Cherokee are at the dock south of town. Slush ice cooled the Captain's ardor.

 

1879
[EDITORIAL COLUMN.]

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, January 8, 1879.

We publish in another column Walton's reply to what he terms a sarcastic local. We certainly have no objections to the boat making every effort to prove successful, but deny, that if a failure, it falls entirely on the owners of the boat. The public have an interest in the navigation and improvement of the river, and if the first boat that starts down with a load runs onto a bar, without power to reverse, and push off, we think it will dampen the ardor of the enterprise, and not enhance our chance for an appropriation. We would like to see the boat make a successful trip, but we would like also to have an appropriation made to improve the river. On that appropriation being made, hangs the entire enterprise.

Now, if our correspondent can look beyond the single object of a small craft with weak power and appreciate the movement to improve hundreds of miles of navigation affording a market to thousands of our people and a blessing to generations, he will realize the situation. The one is a child's toy, the other, a great measure for the benefit of a nation.

[SEYMOUR AND McCLASKEY: STEAMBOAT OWNERS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, January 8, 1879.

Editor Traveler:

SIR: I have been asked by Messrs. Seymour and McClaskey, the builders and owners of the steamboat [CHEROKEE], now completed and ready to move, to make a short reply to a sarcastic local in your last week's issue, in which their work is called a failure, and to state that, in the opinion of good mechanics, the power is fully sufficient to drive the boat, and to say further, that since the matter if successful is all for the people, and if a failure, the heaviest loss will fall on them. They have a right, in justice, to ask a suspension of judgment until they have made a trial. Hoping at least for fair dealing from the paper, they remain yours, SEYMOUR & McCLASKEY,

By A. Walton.

[GOOD NEWS FROM DOWN THE RIVER: REPORT FROM "HENRY STYE."]

Arkansas City Traveler, January 15, 1879.

LITTLE ROCK, ARK., Jan. 2, 1879.
Mr. Henry Pruden:

DEAR SIR: I received a letter from your friend, ________ _________, written Oct. the 12th, and have written to him twice, making him a proposal in each letter, offering to build a boat as good or better than the Aunt Sally at a cost of one thousand dollars. I also furnished him an invoice of material and its cost, except labor and machinery, about two hundred dollars, and as he has failed to answer, I now write to you making you a proposal.

If you and your friends can form a company and furnish the one thousand dollars, you can use your own judgment about sending a man to see that it is expended for that purpose, or you can deposit it here subject to my order, and receive receipted bills as vouchers that the money is used for that purpose. I believe that such a boat would pay for herself in about three trips according to the offers made to other boats. I also propose to take charge of her, and run her in the waters you prescribe, as cheap as any other licensed man can, or take an interest in her.

Would be pleased to hear from you on the subject as soon as possible.

Yours Very Respectfully, HENRY STYE.
Arkansas City Traveler, January 15, 1879.

Little Rock letters inform us that several boats will leave there, loaded with Southern supplies, and destined for this port, as soon as the river opens and the first rise comes.

Winfield Courier, January 16, 1879.

Arkansas City Item.
The steamboat Cherokee still lies bound up in icy chains, unwept, unhonored, and unsung.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 22, 1879.

From Little Rock, Arkansas.
OFFICE OF J. W. AUSTIN & CO., ROSE CITY MILLS.
LITTLE ROCK, ARK., Jan. 14, 1879.
Post Master, Arkansas City, Ks.:

DEAR SIR: As we are desirous of opening up a trade with your country, you will greatly oblige us by handing this to the prominent merchants of your city. We are now paying $1.00 per bushel for No. 2 wheat. Corn is now selling at 50 cents per bushel. Potatoes $2.00 bbl. (all jobbing prices), and lumber $10 to $15, dressed flooring $18, shingles $2.50 to $3.00 per 1,000. Salt $1.50 per bbl. As there is a prospect of the Arkansas River soon rising, when they will start for your place, and any orders merchants (or others) forwarded us will be forwarded on the first boat, and wheat taken in exchange.

P. S. We always pay St. Louis prices for wheat, and often do better than St. Louis.

Respectfully, J. W. AUSTIN & CO.
Arkansas City Traveler, January 22, 1879.

The ice in the Arkansas is growing rotten and we may look for a break up in a few days, after which steamboats and flat boats will begin to make their way up and down the river.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 22, 1879.

Capt. Brodie, formerly of the Steamer Big Rock, writes that he has sold the Big Rock and is building a steamboat suitable for the upper Arkansas River, to cost some $3,500, and would like some resident of Cowley County to take a third interest in the boat and to look after the business here. If any one has a thousand dollars to invest this spring, this would be as good a chance for an investment as has been offered in this part of the country. Anyone thinking of making such an investment can get further particulars by inquiring of I. H. Bonsall, Arkansas City, Cowley County, Kansas.

Winfield Courier, January 23, 1879.

Arkansas City Item.
The thaw is causing our streams to run so that a general breakup is anticipated. The Cherokee is ready to start down and two boats ready at Little Rock to start up as soon as there is a rise in the river.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 29, 1879.

NEWS FROM LITTLE ROCK.
LITTLE ROCK, ARK., Jan. 23, 1879.
Nathan Hughes, Esq."

DEAR SIR: Your favor of 20th at hand. We will take from 1,000 to 5,000 bushels of No. 2 winter wheat delivered here at 90 cts. per bushel, and guarantee to furnish transportation at 25 c. per bushel.

Who have you with capital sufficient to handle the grain business, shipping wheat here to be paid for on arrival? Or will it be necessary for us to send there and buy as it comes in town?

We understand two of your citizens intend bringing down 1,000 bushels with a small steamboat. We will make the offer to encourage the pioneer enterprise.

We will pay the following prices for the wheat here on landing.

For No. 2 winter, $1.00 per bu.

For No. 3 winter, .95 per bu.

For No. 4 winter, .85 per bu.

The lot to be nearly of equal division as to grades. Will you please consult with some grain dealer and place us in communication. We can sent up a boat by February 1st, if the water remains. Respectfully, J. W. AUSTIN & CO., Rose City Mills.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 29, 1879.

There is a proposition to turn out two boat loads of flour for the steamers when they come up.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 29, 1879.

The quotations for lumber at this place, allowing good pay for shipment, will be $8 per thousand less than Wichita prices, when the boats arrive.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 29, 1879.

Wm. Malee, who was pilot on the St. Lawrence for nineteen years, called at this office on Thursday last to make inquiries in reference to the boat now about to start, and the river.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 29, 1879.

Mr. Ballou and experienced river men from the eastern part of the county were down looking at the boat. They expect to go down in the first boat and to investigate the river thoroughly.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 29, 1879.

A letter from Dr. Leonard of the 25th says: "I think the navigation of the river is the big thing for our town and country. Many persons are being introduced to me. You are destined to be a city. The river will be navigated and it will make your town."

Arkansas City Traveler, January 29, 1879.

It will not be long, if the pleasant weather continues, before we shall see several boats from Little Rock. Merchants from Winfield and other small towns will then come to the head of navigation for their goods, instead of ordering from Kansas City and elsewhere.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 5, 1879.

Dr. Griffith and son have purchased a one-half interest in the steamboat Cherokee.

[STEAMER "CHEROKEE"]

Arkansas City Traveler, February 5, 1879.

The owners of the steamer Cherokee have been experimenting with their boat during the past week, preparatory to starting for Little Rock. Having to adapt a saw mill engine, with quick motion, to a steamboat, which requires a slow motion; and as a number of engineers had expressed a doubt about the changes made working successfully, they have very wisely thought best to give the machinery a thorough trial before starting on their trip. They went down the Arkansas to the mouth of the Walnut and came up the Walnut to Harmon's ford, with their boat loaded with wheat. The boat moved up to the "cut-off" with as good speed as the Aunt Sally did empty, and the current to the "cut-off" is as strong as that of the Arkansas. She made four and part of the time at least five miles an hour, up stream. When the owners have the opportunity of getting a good steamboat engine on their boat, it will be one of the best investments in this part of the country, not only for its owners, but for the country at large, as it will be able to make regular trips through the season. The Aunt Sally demonstrated the fact that during a spring rise a boat can run from here to Little Rock without trouble, which was a good point gained. A doubt still exists, however, as to whether the river can be navigated at ordinary stages of water. If the Cherokee can make three or four trips during ordinary stages of water this summer, it will do more to convince steamboat men that the river is as good above Ft. Smith as below, and it will have a good influence on Congress, helping to create an interest in favor of making an appropriation for the improvement of the river.

Excerpts...

[EDITORIAL COLUMN: COWLEY COUNTY, KANSAS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, February 12, 1879.

[FROM THE REAL ESTATE BULLETIN.]
The Arkansas River is navigable from this place to Little Rock three months in a year, and during the last two years the attention of steamboat men and speculators has been directed to the great benefits to be derived from the opening up of water transportation between the Western and Southern States.

During this time several trips have been made to Little Rock by flat boats loaded with flour and grain, and on the morning of the 30th of June, 1878, a regular river packet of 65 tons burden arrived at this place from Little Rock, having made the trip with no difficulty in eleven days--a distance of over 800 miles. Encouraged by this, and having full faith in the ultimate success of the scheme, two parties have built a steamboat at this place, the dimensions of which are 90 x 20 feet, with a capacity of fifty or sixty tons, and started with 1,000 bushels of wheat for Little Rock, February 5th, 1879.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 12, 1879.

Boats will leave Little Rock for this point in a few days. They will bring up groceries, shingles, and dressed lumber.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 12, 1879.

The Steamer, "Cherokee," left our landing on Tuesday, with one thousand bushels of wheat, on her trip to Little Rock.

[RYAN TRYING TO GET MONEY FOR ARKANSAS RIVER SURVEY.]

Arkansas City Traveler, February 19, 1879.

We publish in this number a letter from Hon. Thomas Ryan to M. R. Leonard on the subject of an appropriation to improve the river. We received a somewhat similar letter from Mr. Ryan several days ago, a synopsis of which appears in the local column.

 

WASHINGTON, D. C., Feb. 1, 1879.
Hon. M. R. Leonard, Topeka, Kansas.

I am this moment in receipt of your letter of the 28th ult., signed also by C. R. Mitchell and Nathan Hughes. Allow me to say that it is wholly unnecessary to introduce a bill for this purpose. The proper course is to push the subject upon the Committee on Commerce, and get them to incorporate an appropriation into the River and Harbor Bill. I have thus far been greatly embarrassed by the delay in the report of the survey. It is not possible to get action until that report is before the Committee. At one time I was advised it was in print, and would be out in a few days. I soon after found that was a mistake, and that the report had not yet been received at all at the War Department. I got the War Department to telegraph to St. Louis for it. The reply came that it would be ready in two weeks. It is now time it was here, and probably will be in a day or two. I have never neglected the matter for a moment. I have pushed it upon the committee time and again and they are now awaiting the report preparatory to such action as the report may warrant. I am sensible of the great importance of the project. I was the author of the movement and shall have more pride in prosecuting it to a successful termination than in any other one of my Congressional career, as I believe it will contribute more than any other one measure to develop the resources of the valley.

Respectfully, THOS. R. RYAN.
Arkansas City Traveler, March 12, 1879.

Twenty thousand dollars are appropriated for the improvement of the Arkansas river above Ft. Smith.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 12, 1879.

The Senate added nearly $2,000,000 to the total of the River and Harbor bill as it came from the House, making the present total about $8,000,000.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 12, 1879.

At Little Rock five days ago, the river was falling very slowly, with six feet scant.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 19, 1879.

The River.
Read the report of the river made by a practical man and then say we are not the head of navigation. For the small sum of $100,000, just about the amount Congress sometimes appropriates for a bayou, we can have a navigable river equal to that from Fort Smith to Little Rock to carry off our surplus produce.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 19, 1879.

On the subject of improvement of the Arkansas river, Hon. Thos. Ryan writes as follows:

"We got $20,000 for improvement of the Arkansas between Wichita and Ft. Smith. We would probably have got much more if the report of the survey had arrived before the House Committee on Commerce reported the River and Harbor bill to the House. The report states that the river from this point to Fort Smith can be made as good for navigation as it is between Fort Smith and Little Rock for the sum of $100,000."

Arkansas City Traveler, March 26, 1879.

From the Little Rock papers, we see that the river has fallen to a very low stage, but the carrying trade still goes on. We see that the Aunt Sally is billed for up the river.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 26, 1879.

The Cherokee will again start on her winding way down the river this week. Capt. McCloskey in charge, Will Griffith, Clerk. The boys seem determined to prosecute this enterprise themselves without any regard to talk either way. While they think the river too low for a fair chance, they think with hard work they can get into better water and then work down. They deserve credit for their pluck.

Winfield Courier, March 27, 1879.

NAVIGATION OF THE UPPER ARKANSAS RIVER.
The question of utilizing the vast, though ever-changing current of water, known as the Upper Arkansas River, flowing through our State from west to south-east, and making it the highway to a southern market, has been a living subject with the enterprising agricultural people of Cowley, Sumner, Sedgwick, and those counties lying along and contiguous thereto, ever since the first settlement of that fertile valley in 1870. Owing to their remote distance from a railroad or a market, and the consequent cost of transporting the vast surplus of wheat raised in Cowley and Sumner, this matter has been of vital interest to the people living within their borders. The subject has been discussed in the field and in the grange; has been the slogan of the country politician and the shibboleth of the farmers. It has been resolved upon by conventions, petitioned for by representatives and memorialized by our State Legislature until Congress has taken the matter under consideration, and appointed a commission of competent engineers to personally visit, examine, and report on the feasibility of opening up the stream for navigation, from some point near the terminus of the Wichita branch of the Santa Fe railroad to Little Rock, Arkansas.

In view of these facts, a brief account of the local and individual efforts to solve the problem will doubtless be of interest. During the fall of 1872, A. W. Berkey and A. C. Winton, of Cowley County, built a small flatboat at Arkansas City, loaded it with flour, and started down the river, bound for Little Rock. While they may not have had the "unexplored wildness" that lay between De Soto and the dream of his ambition or the dangers that beset Coronado in his march of disappointment through undiscovered Kansas to encounter, yet four hundred and fifty miles of an unknown river, guarded by a semi-barbarous people who have no particular good feeling towards a frontiersman, lay between them and civilization, presented anything but a cheerful outlook for this pioneer voyage. The trip was made, however, without adventure, and in a reasonable length of time. The produce disposed of, the navigators returned overland to Arkansas City, and reported a fair depth of water and a lively current from the State line to Fort Gibson.

On the strength of this report, a joint stock company was immediately organized, and an agent appointed to proceed at once to the Ohio River and purchase a suitable steamer to ply between the points named. A light draught wharf packet was procured, and a point known as Webbers' Falls, between Little Rock and Fort Gibson, reached on her upward trip. Here it was found that her engines were of insufficient power to stem the current, so she was taken back to Little Rock, and there sold at a loss to her owners of twenty-five hundred dollars.

This failure temporarily dampened the ardor of even the enthusiastic commercial path-finders, and nothing further was attempted until the summer of 1878, when Messrs. W. H. Speers and Amos Walton, two leading public spirited citizens of the county, equipped a "ferry-flat" with a 10 horse-power threshing machine engine, and by several trips up and down the river for a distance of 60 miles from Arkansas City, demonstrated beyond a doubt that a steamer could be successfully propelled on the Arkansas River at any season of the year. The flat was fifty feet long, sixteen feet wide, and drew ten inches of water. This novel little craft visited Grouse Creek, the Walnut River, Salt City, the Kaw Indian Agency, Oxford, and other points along the river, and attracted crowds of people wherever it went. At Oxford a public reception was tendered its officers and crew! These experimental trips were all made while the river was at its lowest stage, and prior to the annual "June rise."

Soon after this and while the "ferry-flat" was still prominently before the public, Mr. I. H. Bonsall, an experienced engineer and prominent citizen of Arkansas City, corresponded with the businessmen of Little Rock, and induced them to send a boat on a trial trip to the upper country.

The little steamer, "Aunt Sally," (see engraving) a tug built for the deep sluggish bayous of Arkansas, and used in the local cotton trade there, was selected and manned for the purpose. Though not designed for swift water, this crude little steamer made the complete voyage, and, in command of Captains Lewis and Baker, with Mr. Chapman as pilot, landed safely at Arkansas City, and was moored there, in the Walnut River, Sunday morning, June 30th, 1878. The officers reported sufficient water and a safe current for light draught steamers for the entire distance, and expressed themselves of the opinion that a boat built especially for the purpose could run regularly between the two States every day in the year.

Soon after the "Aunt Sally" returned South, Henry and Albert Pruden and O. J. Palmer, of Salt City, Sumner County, started for Little Rock with a "ferry-flat" loaded with seven hundred bushels of wheat. The wheat was sold at a good round figure, and the gentlemen returned, reporting a successful trip and a good stage of water.

On their return, the businessmen of Arkansas City, finding that steamboat owners in the lower country were not disposed to adventure up so far with their boats, resolved to build a steamer themselves, and with it make regular trips between their city and the Indian agencies in the Territory. After several attempts to find men of experience to take the matter in charge, McCloskey Seymour secured the services of Mr. Cyrus Wilson, who began the building of a boat for the purposes named.

Wednesday afternoon, November 6, 1878, the "Cherokee," the first steamboat ever built in Kansas, was successfully launched at Arkansas City.

The hull of this boat is 83 feet long, 16 feet wide on the bottom, and 85 feet long and 18 feet wide on the boiler deck; beam, 22 feet, with guards extending 2 feet around a model bow. She carries two twenty-horse power engines, and with all her machinery, draws less than eight inches of water; and, when loaded to the guards, will not draw over sixteen inches. The shallowest water found on the bars between Arkansas City and Little Rock during the lowest stage of the river was eighteen inches. From this it will be seen that the "Cherokee" will answer the purposes for which it was built, and be of great service in transporting the supplies from these counties to the Indian Agencies lying south and east of Arkansas City.

With the Arkansas River opened for navigation, and a good line of boats and barges making regular trips between the points named in this article, business of all kinds will receive a fresh impetus in Southern Kansas. There will be no railroad monopolies, no "pooling of earnings," and no forming of combinations to affect the interest of the producers. The farmers of this locality will then have a highway of their own by which they can exchange their surplus wheat, flour, and corn for the coal and lumber of the Lower Arkansas. The advantages of this proposed line of commerce are apparent, and need not be repeated here. The attention of Congress has been called to them, and we patiently await the official report of its Commission on the subject of navigating the Upper Arkansas River.

--[State Agricultural report.]

Arkansas City Traveler, April 2, 1879

River News.
The river is rising slowly, with 5 2 10 feet by the gauge.

The neat little steamer, "Rose City," arrived last evening with a fine trip. She is receiving, and will leave this evening at 5 p.m. Shippers and planters can bear it in mind. She was built for the trade, and stands No. 1. Capt. Conrad has charge, and the old veteran, James Boland is pilot.

The steamer, "Aunt Sally," arrived, and will leave today for Perryville.

The steamer, "John D. Scully," arrived last evening with a fine trip from New Orleans. She belongs to the Kountz line, and leaves this day for New Orleans, Capt. Poe in command.

Little Rock Democrat.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 2, 1879.

The ferry boat built here for the Pawnee Agency, started from the bridge yesterday for the Pawnee crossing, under command of Capt. H. B. Pruden. She was loaded with 12,000 lbs. of potatoes.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 2, 1879.

ON THE WAY.
The little steamer Nonesuch, built at Dardanelle, has passed Van Buren on her way up the Arkansas river to Arkansas City, Kansas, 275 miles above Fort Gibson.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 16, 1879.

Capt. H. B. Pruden landed at Pawnee Agency with a flat boat loaded with potatoes.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 16, 1879.

A letter from Mr. H. H. Corey, of Spadra, Johnson County, Arkansas, says, "I want to know if one, or two thousand bushels of wheat could be bought readily at your place, also what is the depth of water at medium and low stage. Could a neat little steamboat crawling ten inches when loaded with fifty tons do anything on the river there? We are building a boat for the upper river if there is any business for her." So they come, and one or two successful trips will put us a line of light draught boats on the river all the time.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 23, 1879. Editorial Page.

THE UPPER ARKANSAS.
We publish this week J. D. McKown's report of the upper Arkansas river to Maj. Charles R. Suter, Corps of Engineers, U. S. A. Also the endorsement of the latter officer and recommendation of the work to Brig. Gen. A. A. Humphreys, Chief of Engineers, U. S. A. The same was forwarded to Hon. M. R. Leonard, by our Congressional delegation, and left with the TRAVELER for publication. Senator Plumb writes a very interesting letter on this subject, and will spare no pains in securing the necessary appropriations for this purpose.

REPORT OF MR. J. D. McKOWN, ASSISTANT ENGINEER,
U. S. ENGINEER OFFICE,
St. Louis, Mo., January 27, 1879.
Major: I herewith respectfully submit the following report of the examination of the Arkansas River from the mouth of the Little Arkansas River to Fort Smith.

In accordance with orders received from this office, I proceeded to Wichita, Kansas, and commenced the examination of the river at the mouth of the Little Arkansas.

The latter stream empties into the main river a short distance above Wichita, part of the water is diverted from the natural channel to supply a mill, but again comes into the main river some two and a half miles below the city. The Arkansas River is very tortuous in its course, that portion from Wichita to Arkansas City passing through a prairie country, and has very little timber on the banks, a thin growth of cottonwood and willow prevailing.

The bed of the stream is very wide for the amount of water running, and is of a light sandy nature, quicksand prevailing in a large degree. In many places where the current is strong, there is a thin layer of gravel over the sand, which once broken through, shows the soft sand underneath.

As we go down the river rock becomes somewhat frequent, rock ridges often crossing the stream, sometimes almost amounting to rapids, and leaving but little room for passage of boats at low water.

I had the advantage of seeing the river at a very low stage of water and in its worst condition. At no time during the examination was there a rise of more than six inches, and that lasted but a few days.

Miles.

From Wichita to Arkansas City 65

From Arkansas City to the State line 14

From State line to Grand River 236

From Grand River to Ft. Smith 94

TOTAL: 409 Miles

The small amount of money available rendered rapid work necessary, and hurried reconnaissance was all that could be made. On such information as I could obtain, I respectfully submit the following approximate estimate of the cost of improving the river for steamboat navigation at low-water.

The Little Arkansas River empties into the Arkansas about three quarters of a mile above the bridge at Wichita. The bed of the main stream is from 600 to 800 feet wide from there to the bridge. The slope of the river from the mouth of the Little Arkansas to a point 1 mile below is 3.03 feet; high water mark at Wichita from the best information obtainable is 7.45 feet above low water, but as the landing would probably be below it, it need not be taken into consideration.

From Wichita to El Paso, a distance of some 15 miles, the slope of the river is about 3 feet per mile, or 45 feet for the whole distance. The bed of the river is generally wide, and to within 2 miles of El Paso needs a continued series of dikes and dams to contract it to a proper width, which would be about 150 feet. This would take a dike of 600 feet every half mile for 13 miles, or 7,800 feet in all. About 2 miles above El Paso, the river narrows down to about the required width, with not less than 3 feet of water in the channel. This extends for nearly 2 miles.

About one-half mile above El Paso there is a rocky reef extending across the river, running out from the left, where there is a rocky bank. The expense would be but slight to place it in good boating order: $2,500 would be sufficient.

From El Paso to Oxford the distance is 25 miles. The difference of level between the two places is about 69 feet, giving a slope of 2.75 feet per mile. This piece of river is a continual series of comparatively short bends, and the water being forced on the convex side of them, forms a good channel in most places. It will require about 78,000 feet of dam for this distance, or 312 feet per mile.

About one and one-fourth miles above Oxford there is a brush and rock dam which is built for the purpose of throwing in a race or ditch, where it is used for mill power. The dam is a slight, irregular built affair, angling down stream.

The difference of the level of the water above and below it at the left bank is 1.37 feet. The right bank here is about 40 feet high and of talcose slate.

At Oxford there is a pontoon bridge. A roadway built to it is made of rock, brush, and prairie hay, the latter predominating, and seems to make an excellent dike, closing the river in to about 150 feet, and making a good channel along the bluff for about a half mile.

Some 4 miles above Oxford the Ne-Ne Scah [Ninnescah] Creek empties into the river, adding something to the volume of water.

Brush for mattresses is quite scarce on the river from Wichita to this place; but there is but little doubt that the tall, rank prairie grass, which is indigenous to this region, and grows in great abundance, could be used to advantage in the work by mixing it in with the brush, and in all probability would be economical.

About three-fourths of a mile below Oxford the river widens out and is full of bars. At five miles from Oxford, the banks on the right are high and contain considerable loose slate. The river bottom is of rock, but there is a fair depth of water: from 2½ to 6 feet. About fourteen miles above Arkansas City, the banks on the left are about 30 feet high, of sand and clay, underlaid with loose rock.

The slope of the river from Oxford to Arkansas City, a distance of 25 miles, is 65 feet, or 2.6 feet per mile. There will be necessary for this piece of river about 16,500 feet of dike and dam: 660 feet per mile. The approximate amount of water in the river at Arkansas City is 575 cubic feet per second. At this place there is a wagon-bridge about 600 in length, with the lower chord 20 feet above low-water. A draw would be necessary to allow the passage of boats. In the present state it is an obstruction to navigation.

From Arkansas City to Kaw Agency, the distance is 44 miles. The fall of the river between these points is 110 feet, or 2.5 feet per mile.

It will take about 16,500 feet of work to improve this part of the river, or 375 feet per mile.

The river banks are becoming better timbered, and the river improving. Walnut river empties about six miles below Arkansas City and adds a fair amount to the volume of water in the river.

Below the Walnut the river changes somewhat in character. The banks and bluffs are higher and more rocky, the bed of the river more narrow, and timber more plentiful. Oak, hickory, pecan, walnut, blackberry, and many other varieties are common. Cottonwood, of course, is always to be found on the banks and low grounds. Below and near the State line, and a few miles farther down, about the mouth of Chaloca [Chilocco] Creek, a quantity of loose rock, apparently piled up during freshets, shows itself in the river. Some of this rock should be removed and a dam thrown in to concentrate the water. About $3,000 would do it.

On this piece of river, from Kaw Agency to Salt Creek, the distance is 62 miles. The slope of the river is 136 feet, or about 2.3 feet per mile. It will take about 28,000 feet of dam to improve it, or 451 feet per mile. On this part of the river snags are becoming more plentiful. Between Kaw Agency and Salt Creek the Salt Fork empties; it throws in considerable water.

From Salt Creek to Black Bear Creek, a distance of 15 miles, the river is wide and bad, and will take about 14,000 feet of dam to improve it, or 933 feet per mile. The slope is about 2.2 feet per mile, or 33 feet for the distance of 15 miles. Black Bear Creek comes in on the right, and adds something to the amount of water in the river, even when very low.

From Black Bear Creek to Cimarron River, the distance is 62 miles. The bed of the river is very wide and sandy, sometimes getting as wide as 2,000 feet. It will take some 20,500 feet of dam to improve this part of the river, or 500 feet per mile. The slope of the river is about 1.8 feet per mile, or 112 feet for the distance of 62 miles.

The Cimarron or Red Fork of the Arkansas comes in on the right, and contributes a considerable amount of water to the main river. Its deep red tinge is in strong contrast with the muddy water of the Arkansas, and the waters running side by side some distance before mingling have a marked and unique appearance.

From the Cimarron to the mouth of Grand River the distance is 87 miles. The slope of the river in this distance is about 152 feet, or 1.75 per mile. It will take about 38,000 feet of dam to improve this portion of the river, or 437 feet per mile.

About 3 miles above the mouth of Grand River is the bridge of the Missouri, Kansas and Texas Railroad. The length is 800 feet; there are four spans of 200 feet each, and the lower chord is 34 above low-water. The bridge is a strong and handsome structure, built of wood and iron. It has no draw, and may be considered an obstruction.

About one-fourth of a mile above, the mouth of the Verdigris empties and makes quite an addition to the volume of water. The Grand River discharges still more than the Verdigris, and together they make a very perceptible difference in the main stream.

Below the mouth of the Grand, the river changes very much in its character. The bed of the river is not so wide, the channel much better, and the bars and banks contain more gravel.

From the mouth of Grand River to Greenleaf's Creek, about 28 miles, generally good; 5,000 feet of dam will suffice for this distance, but it is almost impassable in places on account of snags, which in some locations almost fill the water-way.

At Greenleaf's Creek the river was closed with ice, and the examination had to be abandoned. But as Mr. Albert had made a survey of that part of the river in 1879, his report will give information concerning it. The distance from Grand River to Fort Smith is 94 miles, and I should think that $150,000 would be sufficient as most all of the work would be in shallow water.

SUMMARY.
Locality. Distance, miles.

Wichita to El Paso: 15

El Paso to Oxford: 25

Oxford to Arkansas City: 25

Arkansas City to Kaw Agency: 44

Kaw Agency to Salt Creek: 62.5

Salt Creek to Black Bear Creek: 15

Black Bear Creek to Cimarron River: 41.5

Cimarron River to Grand River: 87

Grand River to Fort Smith: 94

Total: 409 miles.

Locality. Linear Feet of dam.

Wichita to El Paso: 7,200

El Paso to Oxford: 7,800

Oxford to Arkansas City: 17,000

Arkansas City to Kaw Agency: 16,500

Kaw Agency to Salt Creek: 28,000

Salt Creek to Black Bear Creek: 14,000

Black Bear Creek to Cimarron River: 20,500

Cimarron River to Grand River: 38,000

Grand River to Fort Smith:

Total: 149,000 linear feet of dam.

Locality.

El Paso to Oxford: $3,000 Cost of rock excavation.

Arkansas City to Kaw Agency: $3,000 Cost of rock excavation.

Total: $6,000 Cost of rock excavation.

Locality. Cost.

Wichita to El Paso: $32,400

El Paso to Oxford: $38,600

Oxford to Arkansas City: $76,500

Arkansas City to Kaw Agency: $77,250

Kaw Agency to Salt Creek: $126,000

Salt Creek to Black Bear Creek: $63,000

Black Bear Creek to Cimarron River: $92,250

Cimarron River to Grand River: $174,000

Grand River to Fort Smith: $150,000

Total: $826,500

Add for contingencies and Engineer expenses: $73,500

GRAND TOTAL: $900,000
The Arkansas River passes through the Indian Territory, from the southern boundary line of the State of Kansas, to Fort Smith, Arkansas, a distance of about 330 miles by river. Little trade could be expected from the Territory except in the Cherokee Nation, between Fort Smith and the Grand River, where perhaps some business might be done.

That portion of the country tributary to the river in Kansas, from Wichita to the State line, is rich, fertile, and well cultivated, and would derive great benefit from the opening of the river to navigation. Very Respectfully, J. D. McKOWN, Assistant Engineer.

Maj. CHAS. R. SUTTER, Corps of Engineers, U. S. A.

In accordance with your instructions of July 8th, 1878, I have caused a reconnaissance to be made by Mr. J. D. McKown, assistant engineer, of the Arkansas River from the mouth of Little Arkansas to Fort Smith, and a copy of his report thereon is herewith submitted.

Except in the upper portion before mentioned, the navigable low-water depth is about the same as that of the Arkansas River between Little Rock and Fort Smith, and it would of course be useless to attempt to get a greater depth until the balance of the stream was correspondingly improved.

The estimates presented by Assistant McKown are for removing snags and rocks and so contracting the width of the stream as to give at low-water a depth of about 2 feet, but this estimate is only a rough approximation at the best, and no work on this scale should be undertaken, even if deemed advisable, until a thorough survey of the stream has been made, the cost of which is estimated at $16,360.

I am, however, of the opinion that by removing the snags and constructing slight dams at some of the worst shoals the navigation would be so much improved as to render it as good as that between Little Rock and Fort Smith, and this would seem to be all that is worth doing until the general improvement of the river is undertaken. The cost of this work would be about $100,000, which could be expended in one season.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

CHAS. R. SUTTER, Maj. of Engineers.
Brig. Gen. A. A. HUMPHREYS, Chief of Engineers, U. S. A.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 23, 1879.

PAWNEE AGENCY, INDIAN TERRITORY, April 14th, 1879.
Ed. TRAVELER:

The Steamer Dardanelle landed at this place today on her first trip up the Arkansas. She is a small boat, built especially for the upper Arkansas trade: draws eight inches of water empty. The steamer belongs to Cotton Bros. & Co., Dardanelle, Arkansas, who are engaged in running a large flouring mill at that place. One of the firm is Captain on the boat, and means to load her down with wheat to supply his mill. Yours truly, T. E. BERRY.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 30, 1879.

The Arkansas river got its back up last week and is now on a gush. Look for boats up any day.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 30, 1879.

A Government ferryboat will soon be placed on the Salt Fork at the Ponca Agency.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 7, 1879.

THE STEAM BOAT.
The Steamer "None Such," the first boat of the season from the Lower Arkansas, reached this port of entry last Wednesday evening. She is a light draft boat, drawing but eight inches, with side wheels, and designed exclusively for the upriver trade. Capt. Cotton tells us that he met the rise in the river about sixty miles below here, though he feels confident that he could easily have made this port with his trim little steamer, at low water mark.

He passed the Steamer "Cherokee" on her way down, near the Pawnee Landing. The steamer will remain here for two or three days when she will load with one thousand sacks of wheat and return to the lower country.

The "Fletcher," the "Big Rock," and the "Water Witch," are all billed for this port on the mountain rise, and will bring up shingles, lumber, etc., and return with wheat to supply the Dardanelle and Little Rock market.

This is an enterprise that will develop our country, and the beautiful part of the scheme is that Congress is disposed to give us the requisite aid to improve the navigation of the Arkansas without bonds or pledges. As No. 2 wheat is always worth one dollar at Little Rock, farmers can sow a broad acreage this fall, feeling reasonably certain that our home market will, in the future, reward their industry.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 14, 1879.

Look out for the boat, John G. Fletcher, which will be up the last of the week. Read the notice of her departure in another column.

[EDITORIAL PAGE: ARTICLE RE STEAMER JOHN G. FLETCHER.]

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, May 14, 1879.

The river is on a stand with 9 feet and 7 ft., 10 inches, by the United States gauge, but from reports above there have been very heavy rains, so we can look for a big river, and planters can take it in time.

The steamer "John G. Fletcher" left the levee this morning and went up to the Cairo and Fulton railroad landing for 50,000 feet of lumber for Arkansas City, Kansas. She also will take other freight and passengers. It will be a pleasant trip. So passengers going to Colorado or Leadville will find it to their advantage to consult Capt. Hennegin. He also takes freight for Dardanelle, Webb City, Fort Smith, and Fort Gibson, leaving on Thursday at 5 p.m. It will take two weeks to make the round trip, the distance being 850 miles from Little Rock. Capt. Hennegin will have the pleasure of taking the first boat through of her size, for which he deserves great credit. Democrat.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 14, 1879.

Keep it before the people that the Cowley, Sumner & Fort Smith R. R. will reach here the coming fall. The appropriation for the Arkansas river will be used in improving navigation this season, and hence, two highways to market will be secured. Now is the time to make investments of capital in this city, and those who take advantage of these circumstances will become the fortunate ones.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 28, 1879

The steamer, Cherokee, was at Ft. Smith on the 19th. She will there discharge her cargo and return up the river immediately.

[THE STEAMER "CHEROKEE."]

Arkansas City Traveler, May 28, 1879.

From the Headquarters of the Arkansas.
The little steamer Cherokee made its appearance at our wharf on Monday last from Arkansas City, Kansas, 444 miles above this place by U. S. measurement, Captain McClaskey in command with a crew of eleven men. The Cherokee brought 800 bushels of fine wheat and reports the river low, yet navigable for small boats. She met the John G. Fletcher above Webber's falls, discharging her lumber and preparing to return. Had the Fletcher started a week sooner, she would have reached Arkansas City without trouble and sold her lumber at a fair profit and could have brought 20,000 bushels of wheat down on the June rise. Good wheat is worth from 50 to 60 cents at Arkansas City, and here about $1.00. The wheat brought here is of a superior quality. Arkansas City is in Cowley County, Kansas, and has about 800 inhabitants. Winfield, the county seat, has about 2,000; population of the county is about 18,000. There are four papers in the county, three Republican and one Democratic, the reverse of this county, which has three Democratic papers to one Republican. This in a great measure is an index of the kind of people there, and accounts for the rapid development of that region, which was a wild country but half a dozen years ago.

Ft. Smith New Era.

[STATE NEWS.]

Winfield Courier, May 29, 1879.

Five steamboats are plying between Dardanelle and Arkansas City.

[REPORT FROM AMOS WALTON RE THE "CHEROKEE" STEAMSHIP.]

Arkansas City Traveler, June 11, 1879. Editorial Page.

FROM THE CHEROKEE.
FORT SMITH, May 29th.
EDITOR TRAVELER:

Supposing a desire on the part of the friends of the Cherokee to hear something in regard to the trip and our experience on the river, I propose to write in brief, until I can give them a more thorough knowledge of the facts developed by our experience.

We left Salt Fork, or Ponca Agency, at which place I joined the crew, on the 26th of April, at half past one o'clock, and landed in the mouth of Poteau at half past five o'clock on the morning of the 19th of May: our actual time, about 21-1/2 days. We laid up whole days, without moving, according to my diary, 8, and detained two days, one upon snags, where we had a good channel but accidentally struck our bow upon one and drifted upon more; and one whole day at the mouth of Verdigris, by missing channel--making 10 days without running. I estimate, also, three days lost for lack of appliances and some experience in the river, and think now, that if we had the same trip to make again, we could make it in about eight days. Although the river was low, our soundings generally run over two feet. Some of the worst river was for about 15 miles below Bear creek, where it spread out very wide, with numerous channels. I think our worst bar was at the mouth of Cimarron, where the water spread evenly over the whole river--a smooth, solid bar, but sounding two feet. Taken altogether, we are satisfied that the river can be utilized as a means of transportation to our city and our producing community.

As you advance down the river, the timber grows better and extends farther away from the river--the Cedar begins to make its appearance on the bluffs, and we begin to see something that looks like coal formation, cropping out from the banks.

About 12 miles above Childer's ferry, on Old House creek; 3 miles from the river, is a four foot vein of splendid coal. This is on the left bank of the river. Further down, on the right, and just above Childer's ferry, is a vein of the same depth, which has been worked. Either can be worked without any difficulty.

Below this, again, on the farm of Napoleon Moore, we dug, from the bank by the boat, some very fine coal, which we used in the forge and furnace. These first outcroppings our smith called good coal. We have specimens and intend to take a ton or two back with us.

As we go on down, we find the river growing better in the length of the runs without crossing--sometimes narrow and deep for six or eight miles, with high banks on either side, and sometimes breaking away from the river in a gently ascending slope covered with grass and thinly scattered oaks. The scenery alone is worth the trouble and hardships incident to a trip down the river.

We have been kindly received and well treated by the people of Fort Smith, and part of them are fully alive to the importance of working up a river trade, while some seem to have grown rich here and feel that the country is far enough advanced for all their purposes. The town is a small one in population, considering the amount of territory covered. Many of the premises take in two acres of ground, and you can walk around among these country homes for hours, finding splendid old oaks for shade trees--cedars, flowers, and blue grass for adornment. When you first see the town, you see only the main street, and expect a town of about 1500 inhabitants, but after you have traveled for hours around in the suburbs you conclude they have what they claim, about 6,000. They have four newspapers--three Democratic and one Republican; seven churches; one fine furniture and chair factory, splendidly furnished with machinery, and anxious to work up a trade with us. They have a great many business houses and no specialties; they keep everything under the same roof that people want or call for. Their busy time is after cotton picking commences.

We sold the wheat to Dr. Wall, who has a very fine mill about one mile out of town with all the latest improvements and capable of grinding 300 bushels a day.

I have been treated very kindly by the gentlemen of the press here, who are, as they always are, everywhere, keenly alive to the importance of opening trade with our country, and they promise hearty cooperation with us in our attempts to improve and navigate the river.

There have been two courts in session here--State and United States--and I have had a chance to see that summary dispensation of justice we read of in the U. S. Courts. I have seen a jury take only three-quarters of an hour to condemn a man to death, that I, although hearing all the evidence, arguments of counsel, and charge of the Judge, would not have condemned at all--only a slight difference of opinion; one calls it justice, another says it is judicial murder.

To conclude, I have written this hasty letter to give you some idea, for the present, of what we have seen and done. I will say in regard to pine lumber, wagon stuff, furniture in the rough, coal or fuel of other kinds, we can make an exchange that would be of almost incalculable benefit to our country, and there is a market along the river for all our wheat, corn, and potatoes; and I am now satisfied that they can be successfully transported by the river.

I start up the river tomorrow. Yours, A. W.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

Capt. Walton, of the steamer Cherokee, hove into this port of entry last Monday morning. He reports leaving the boat at Ft. Gibson on the 10th, and gives it as his opinion that she will reach here in a few days. The steamer has on board pine lumber, shingles, and wagon stuff.

Excerpts...

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1879.

GRAND CELEBRATION 4TH OF JULY, 1879!
Arkansas City, Cowley County, Ks.
The Citizens of Arkansas City have made arrangements to give the people of Southern Kansas a grand entertainment at a grove on the banks of the Walnut near town, with the following attractions.

Steamboat Excursion.
We are expecting the Steamer Cherokee from below, and if the river is in good beating stage, will give Excursions down the river through the day, with accommodations for everybody.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 25, 1879.

Agent Whiteman says the Indians report that the "Steamer Cherokee" has passed on her way up the river. We now look for her certain on the 4th.

Winfield Courier, September 25, 1879.

Go to the foundry and see the new steamboat.

Winfield Courier, September 25, 1879.

Some gentleman from the north part of the state is building a small steamboat for the Walnut, which he intends to run between here and Arkansas City when the water isn't too low. He proposes lifting the boat over the dams with a windlass. The hull is already built, and is thirty feet long and six feet beam. It will be a "side-wheeler," and will be propelled by a Paine engine of three horsepower. We hope he will succeed with his enterprise, and are quite certain that he will find enough pleasure-seekers to make it a paying investment.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 1, 1879.

The Arkansas river at Pine Bluff, Arkansas, is but twelve inches in the channel, and three steamboats are aground.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 12, 1879.

We have a communication from a party claiming to be an old steamboat man who says he wants to build a large boat for the Arkansas river for the purpose of towing flats.

[THE NEW STEAMER.]

Winfield Courier, December 11, 1879.

Last Saturday we took a trial trip on the miniature steamboat, the "Necedah," of which we have spoken before as being built by Mr. E. R. Appleby for the Walnut at this place. The boat is a perfect little beauty, is 31 feet long, and 7 feet wide, will carry 40 persons, and is propelled by a "Corney" engine, three-horse power, built especially for this boat. We steamed up the river over five miles, made several stoppages, and returned in less than two hours. The boat was as smooth as a Mississippi river steamer, and can be propelled at the rate of 8 miles an hour. It is the intention of the builder to run it as a pleasure boat, and no person could pass an hour more pleasantly than by taking a ride up the river on the little "Necedah."

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, December 17, 1879.

Navigation on the Arkansas has closed for the season on account of the ice.

 

1880
Winfield Courier, January 22, 1880.

Suss, Seward, Troup, and several others went up the river last Sunday on the little steamboat. When about two miles up, they spied a lame duck with a broken wing, and immediately started in pursuit. The duck proved to be a good swimmer, and for over an hour the contest for possession on one hand and life and liberty on the other, was waged with unequaled fierceness. But the duck was captured, and that evening seven tired but brave souls were tucked away in seven little beds, with a duck feather ornamenting each headboard as a trophy of this glorious victory. They now think of joining the militia.

Excerpts...

[COMMENTS: ARKANSAS VALLEY PRESS ASSN. MEETING.]

Winfield Courier, April 29, 1880.

Another report: "After a pleasant ride across to Winfield through as beautiful country as there is to be found in Kansas, we landed in the bright, enterprising, and handsome county town of Cowley. Omnibuses and carriages were in attendance, and all the editors and their friends were soon most hospitably cared for. The programme of the citizens' committee provided a theatrical entertainment for those who arrived on Friday. Carriage drives, boat rides on the small steamer any hour on Saturday, and after the adjournment of the editorial convention, a ball at Manning's splendid opera house followed by a banquet."

Another report: "We were greeted as the guests of the city, sumptuously entertained, 'busses and carriages were at the disposal of the editors, and the beautiful city was shown to best advantage, a little steamboat constantly played up and down the Walnut to give the editors what Kansas people seldom enjoy, a steamboat ride--there is fourteen miles of still-water navigation in the Walnut at that place--bands played, and the 'crack' military company of the State turned out for dress parade, while flags and banner streamed from housetops."

Another report: "The editors were met at the depot, placed in carriages, and escorted to the town by the Winfield Guards, who made a handsome appearance in their light uniforms. Winfield with its handsome buildings, and fourteen miles of stone sidewalk, was a wonder to all who never saw the place before. The editors paid a visit to the quarries where the wonderful Cowley County stone comes from. Among others they visited the quarry of Babcock, Sarjeant and Smith, and saw the stone which is going to go into the new Government building at Topeka. The stone is what is known as the magnesian lime stone, but is of much finer texture than either the Junction City or Cottonwood. The editors visited the Winfield foundry by special invitation to witness the casting of a fourteen foot column; they also were taken on an excursion seven miles up the Walnut in a beautiful side wheel steamer, which was gaily decorated for the occasion."

"At four o'clock the editors, their ladies, and the invited guests, were taken about the city in carriages, and then to the wharf on the Walnut, where was tied up the steamer Necedah, a small steamboat, 31 feet long, built to run on the Walnut. For several hours the little craft was kept busy steaming up and down the river, giving the editors and their ladies an opportunity to try a life on the ocean wave. The Necedah carries twenty passengers and navigates the river fourteen miles above the city."

Winfield Courier, April 29, 1880.

There is talk of getting up a boating club here. The Walnut offers fine opportunity for boating, and it is a pleasant as well as a healthful exercise.

Winfield Courier, May 6, 1880.

Steamer Necedah
Will leave her landing at Bliss' mill, on Saturdays, at 2 and 4 o'clock p.m. on a trip up the Walnut, 5 miles and return, to accommodate any and all who may wish to take a boat ride on a live steamer. On Sundays will go out every 2 hours. Parties wishing the services of the boat on other days during the week, for picnics, etc., should leave orders on slate in cabinet shop in old ten pin alley.

Also all kinds and styles of boats neatly built to order. E. R. APPLEBY.

Winfield Courier, May 6, 1880.

A mania for boating has taken hold of the young men here. Several "clipper-built" skiffs are now on the river, and two others are in the "dry dock" and will be launched with due ceremony in a few days.

Winfield Courier, May 6, 1880.

Winfield is the prettiest town, has the finest sidewalks, most commodious business blocks, convenient opera house, best building stone, liveliest newspapers, spiciest local writers, neatest morning daily, most hospitable people, best regulated post-office, artillery company, public schools, steamboat landing, and has the handsomest women of any town in the state. At least that is the way we heard it when there last week. Clay County Dispatch

Take care, Wirt, you're getting back to your "old tricks" again.

[ARTICLE FROM WICHITA EAGLE RE NAVIGABLE ARKANSAS RIVER.]

Arkansas City Traveler, May 12, 1880. Front Page.

MORE ABOUT OUR NAVIGABLE RIVER.
Nixon, not satisfied with the report and verdict of the engineer designated by the government to make a survey of the Arkansas River, or at least not satisfied that Congress and its members would approve the practicability of the scheme, in addition and accompanying the petitions forwarded by him, obtained and forwarded the affidavits of two men who had made experiments.

Mr. O. E. Kimball, of Oxford, who has lived on the bank of the river nine years, swears that in 1871 he constructed and for some time thereafter ran a ferry boat at that point. The river at this point is about 500 feet wide and the channel was ever changing and cutting out deep holes.

In 1877, for the purpose of a pontoon bridge, John Murphy constructed a jetty about half way across the river of hay, trash, and small stone. The result was in a very short time a deep channel, with even smoothly flowing current, cleaning out all the bars, and for a long distance, both above and below the jetty, deep enough for ordinary navigation.

The next affidavit is made by Amos Walton, now editor of the Arkansas City Democrat, who swears that he has had experience in running a ferry boat on the Arkansas river by steam, and has also experience in contracting the channel by the same, by the use of a brush jetty. He threw three channels into one of about 200 feet wide. The channel and jetty are still extant and as good as when examined by McKown. Walton swears that he ran a light draught steamer one trip down to the mouth of Grouse creek, one trip down to the Kaw Indian agency, and another trip to Ft. Smith and as far back as the Ft. Gibson bridge. He swears that wherever the river was confined by obstructions, he found a good clear channel and that he agrees with the report made by the U. S. engineer corps.

Now what have the incredulous to say? Wichita Eagle.

Excerpt...

[HON. THOMAS RYAN, OF TOPEKA.]

Winfield Courier, May 20, 1880. Front Page.

He succeeded in enlisting Congress in inaugurating a survey of the Arkansas river to the line of his State, with a view to its improvement for the purpose of navigation. Last year Congress appropriated $20,000 for the improvement of that river from Ft. Smith to Wichita, and will this session appropriate a like sum. If the stream can be made navigable for one half of the year, it will be of incalculable advantage to the State of Kansas.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 13, 1880.

Capt. Curtis, in charge of a U. S. surveying party, passed through town last week. He is making another survey of the Arkansas River, in view of its improvement so as to be capable of navigation.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 17, 1880.

We understand that Mr. L. C. Wood, formerly of this city but now of Wichita, has secured from the Government the contract for removing snags from the Arkansas river between Wichita and Fort Gibson. He is building a boat at Wichita, and expects to be in Arkansas City about the first or second week in December. If our friend can crown his labors with success, we may look for a revival of the navigation scheme.

Arkansas City Traveler, December 8, 1880.

THE DREDGE BOATS.
The Arkansas river crafts, to which the Beacon so sneeringly refers, are now about ready for business--will be finished tomorrow.

The main working boat, which is of the flatboat pattern, is 14 x 45, bottomed with two-inch plank, and heavily braced and floored. Upon it will be placed the derricks, ropes, tackle, anchors, and machinery for taking up snags, stumps, trees, and other obstructions from the river--the work to begin here at once.

The other boat is a small, covered one, intended for private use, storing tools, living in, and keeping such things safe and dry as it is not best or practicable to leave exposed. This "vessel" is only 7 x 23, and it is solidly, as well as neatly, built.

There can be no mistaking it, there is wisdom in the movement, whether it is a pet hobby of Hon. Thomas Ryan or any other person. The river should be kept clean, whether it can be made navigable or not. But we believe it can be made so; and most effectually, for light draught vessels.

When that is accomplished, look out for a rise in wheat and other products, the same as they have at Fort Smith, or approximating thereto. Wheat there is now quoted at one dollar; corn, 56 and 70, and other things in proportion. Let the clearing go on. Wichita Republican.

 

1881
Arkansas City Traveler, January 5, 1881.

Capt. Curtis, in command of the party for opening up the Arkansas River, is constructing a boat on the Walnut (near Pat Endicott's place), the same being 18 feet beam by 70 long, to be used as a commissary by the command. The boat will be covered with canvas, and will add greatly to the comfort of those engaged in the undertaking.

ARKANSAS RIVER NAVIGATION.
Arkansas City Traveler, January 5, 1881.

In pursuance of a previous notice, a meeting of the citizens of Ft. Smith was held at the court room in Fort Smith on Saturday evening, December 18, 1880.

On motion Capt. A. H. Reynolds was called to the chair and C. M. Barnes appointed secretary. The chairman stated the object of the meeting, which was to cooperate with the citizens of Kansas in improving the navigation of the Arkansas River.

Mayor Brizzolari submitted the following preamble and resolutions, which were adopted.

WHEREAS, It is of vital importance to the development of our trade and commerce that the free and uninterrupted navigation of the Arkansas River should be secured to us by Congress, by proper legislation, from Wichita, Kansas, to the city of Little Rock, thereby affording us river navigation to the Mississippi, and with the view of securing this object--be it

Resolved, That this meeting shall be known and designated as the Arkansas River Navigation Association; and be it further

Resolved, That the chairman appoint an executive committee of five persons, which executive committee shall be known as the executive committee of the Arkansas River Navigation Association of Fort Smith.

It shall be the duty of said executive committee to draft suitable memorials to Congress to further and promote the free navigation of the Arkansas River by improvements in the channel.

The aforesaid committee shall act in concert and place themselves in communication with all associations, meetings, companies, and organizations having the same object in view. The said committee shall take steps to induce all other cities, towns, and counties lying on the Arkansas river to join us in our efforts.

They shall have power to appoint such committees to aid them in their labors, and said committee is fully empowered to take any needful steps to secure and further the objects and purpose of the Association.

The following gentlemen were appointed as such executive committee: Hon. I. C. Parker, Hon. Wm. M. Fishback, Hon. James Brizzolari, Hon. B. T. DuVal, Col. Thomas Marcum. On motion it was resolved that Capt. A. H. Reynolds should be added to the said committee.

It was further resolved that the Ft. Smith newspapers and other papers favorable be requested to publish the proceedings of this meeting, when, on motion, the meeting adjourned to meet again at the call of the executive committee.

A. H. REYNOLDS, Chairman.
C. M. BARNES, Secretary. Fort Smith Elevator.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 5, 1881.

A meeting of the representative men of Kansas, Arkansas, and the Indian Territory will be held at Wichita today for the purpose of talking up and advocating measures looking to the opening of the Arkansas River for navigation. This is one of the most important questions for the above mentioned States now on the tapis, and a successful result would give them market facilities second to none in the United States.

Winfield Courier, January 6, 1881.

The Arkansas City Democrat says:

Capts. Wood and Smith are building a large boat on the Walnut, to be used in snagging out the Arkansas.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 19, 1881.

The Kansas City Journal says the Arkansas River is frozen over as far south as Little Rock, and navigation to Wichita is closed.

[ITEM FROM THE MONITOR.]
Winfield Courier, January 20, 1881.

The Arkansas river is a navigable stream, or so reported, and a party of United States employees are now clearing it of snags and obstructions as far north as Wichita, and the Oxford people are trembling for their pontoon bridge and the water power mill of Bates & Thompson. The latter enterprise alone is worth more than all the navigation of that stream will be in the whole state of Kansas.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 9, 1881.

F. M. Vaughn recently took a load of corn from this city to Pawnee Agency; and in crossing the Salt Fork on the ferry boat, the load proved too heavy for the boat, causing it to sink. Luckily they had passed the deeper channel, and hitching his mules to the boat, Mr. Vaughn pulled boat, wagon, corn, and men safely to shore. F. M. Vaughn says ferry boats are handy things to have.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 20, 1881.

This, from the Ft. Smith Independent, explains itself.

We have two little steamers now running from Ft. Smith to points above in the Indian Territory. This line has a lively and increasing trade between Fort Smith and the upper lands in merchandise, lumber, corn, hides, cotton seed, baled cotton and hay, and from twelve to twenty passengers each trip.

Commodore Huff has recently placed on the line a new boat--the "Fort Smith"--de-signed to run in the trade between Fort Smith and Arkansas City, Kansas.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 4, 1881.

A Dr. C. F. Adams, who is navigating the Arkansas river under the auspices of Gov. St. John, arrived in Wichita last week. He left Pawnee Forks, three hundred miles west of Wichita, two weeks since. He says at the present low stage of water, there are several stretches of from three to four miles of water from four to ten feet deep. The Doctor's objective point is Little Rock, and what he will find further down we cannot say, but so far, he says, the river is navigable without a great outlay of money, and he will report to headquarters to that effect.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 11, 1881.

Dr. C. F. Adams, whom we mentioned last week as making an investigation of the Arkansas river, with a view to its navigation, arrived in town last Thursday, and of course reported at the TRAVELER office. He is traveling alone in a small boat, 4 feet beam and 14 feet in length, and expects to arrive at Ft. Smith in about two weeks. The trip from Oxford to this city was made in a little over half a day, and the Dr. is firmly convinced of the navigability of this stream by properly constructed boats. Among other interesting matters, Dr. Adams stated that he found coal at various points along his route, and called especial attention to a vein near the mouth of Slate creek, which he estimated at 12 feet thick and but forty feet below the surface, which he traced for a mile and a half along the river. Should this fact be verified, it will be the means of solving the much vexed fuel question for this region. That coal underlies the greater portion of the State seems to be pretty generally believed, the only question being as to whether it exists at a depth which will render the working of the veins practicable.

[REPORT FROM "IKE" - ARKANSAS CITY.]

Winfield Courier, May 19, 1881.

The boys in charge of the snag boat say their captain will be up from Fort Smith by the first of next month with a steam snagger, ready for cleaning the Arkansas of snags. IKE.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 25, 1881.

We have seen some letters from Capt. Curtis, of the U. S. Eng. corps in charge of the improvement of the Arkansas, written to L. C. Wood, Esq. Mr. Curtis has been at Little Rock, Arkansas, for several months superintending the building of the river steamboat to come up the river to Arkansas City. The boat is of the size of those used on the lower river, will have the latest improved machinery, and of draught light enough to run up to Arkansas City at any season of the year. Capt. Curtis expects to have his boat completed by the latter part of June, and run up to Arkansas City by the 10th of July. Wichita Republican.

Excerpt...

Winfield Courier, June 9, 1881 - Front Page

The river here affords splendid opportunities for boating, and a steam pleasure boat is to be put upon the waters soon, in addition to which will be several small boats, which will be let out to parties for a reasonable consideration.

[SNAG BOAT "WICHITA" - ARKANSAS RIVER SERVICE.]

Arkansas City Traveler, August 31, 1881.

Snag Boat.
From a Little Rock paper we clip the following description of the government snag boat "Wichita," which was built for service in the Arkansas River above Fort Smith and named as a compliment to one of the flourishing towns of Kansas. The trial trip took place August 1st, and any day we may look for the "Wichita's" appearance on our waters.

"The boat was built by Capt. Joe Evins, of Dardanelle, under the supervision of Capt. T. H. Handbury, corps of engineers, United States army, government engineer of this district. All the wood, with the exception of the cabin, built by J. Lawrence, of St. Louis, was obtained in this city. William Farrell, of the Wrightsville mill, furnishing the excellent lumber used in the hull. The boat is 125 feet in length, with a 26 foot beam and 3 feet hold. When completed she will draw sixteen inches. She has two steel boilers, each 36 inches in diameter and 16 feet in length. They have four flues each. There are double engines, cylinders 8-1/2 inches in diameter, with a stroke of 36 inches. She is supplied with a first-class stand capstan, and a crane to pull sixty tons. She will have accommodations for officers and crew to the number of thirty, and no efforts will be spared to make her one of the best crafts dedicated to the stump pulling service of Uncle Sam."

[SNAG BOAT ON THE WAY: "WICHITA."]

Arkansas City Traveler, October 5, 1881.

On the Way.
From a letter to the Schiffbauer Bros., of our city, from Capt. Thos. H. Handbury, of the corps of engineers, now stationed at Little Rock, Arkansas, under date of September 23rd, we clip the following.

"In the course of a few days, now, the new snag boat, 'Wichita,' which has been built for service in the Arkansas River, between Fort Smith, Arkansas, and Wichita, Kansas, will set out from this place for her field of duty. In due time it is hoped that she will reach your city and open up a channel of commerce which will greatly benefit the merchants and farmers of your vicinity, as well as those on the river below."

The boat is under the command of Captain Joseph Evins, who will, upon his arrival here, take charge of the flat boats and other Government property left in the hands of Messrs. Schiffbauer last winter. We trust that the initial trip of the "Wichita" may be fruitful to good results, and her coming will be anxiously looked for from this time on.

[U. S. SNAG BOAT EN ROUTE TO ARKANSAS CITY.]

Arkansas City Traveler, November 9, 1881. Editorial Page.

C. H. Williams, one of the engineers on the U. S. Snag boat, now en route for this place, was in town last week. The boat, of which a full description was given in the TRAVELER some time since, is now lying near the mouth of the Cimarron, awaiting a rise of water. Capt. Joe. Evins is in command, with a crew of twenty-eight men.

Cowley County Courant, November 17, 1881.

The Arkansas City Democrat learns from C. H. Williams, second engineer on the boat, who was in that city last week after the mail for the crew, that Capt. Joe. Evins with a U. S. snag boat, a steamer of eighty horse power, manned with a crew of twenty-eight men, is now lying on the Arkansas ten miles above the mouth of the Cimarron, about one hundred miles from this city. He says they started from Little Rock, Arkansas, on the 26th of September, in a good head of water, and found no difficulty in reaching the point above named, but says they will have to lay up where they are until there is another rise in the river sufficient to carry them over the sand bars. They have three months provisions on board, and are well provided to hold the fort until the raging Arkansas lets down more water, when they will sail for this point, the head of navigation.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 30, 1881.

Mr. Evins, one of the crew of the snag boat, "Wichita," now lying near Ponca Agency, and waiting for a raise of water to make this city, was in town several days of last week.

Arkansas City Traveler, December 21, 1881.

The Government snag boat, "Wichita," is now on the Arkansas River just east of Pawnee Agency. They will have to wait for the water to rise before coming further.

Arkansas City Traveler, December 21, 1881.

Two men from Winfield started down the Arkansas River last week, in a small boat. When east of Ponca Agency, they got out to take a view of the surroundings, and noticed high bluffs just east of where they were, and inquired what stream put in there. On being informed that it was the bluffs of the Arkansas, they looked at one another and wondered. They had traveled about seventy miles by the river and only got thirty-five miles from Arkansas City, which they had left sometime previous. The river makes a bend of fifteen miles east and then comes in again almost due south of town.

 

1882
[GOVERNMENT SNAG BOAT "WICHITA" NOW NEAR PAWNEE AGENCY.]

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, January 4, 1882. Editorial Page.

OUR FUTURE HIGHWAY.
The Government Snag Boat Wichita Now Lying in the
Arkansas River Near Pawnee Agency, Indian Territory.
During the past two or three weeks considerable excitement has prevailed in town with reference to the project for opening up and rendering the Arkansas River navigable for suitable craft at all seasons of the year, at least as far up as Arkansas City. One or two appropriations have already been made by Congress for this purpose, and the work has been going on quietly for some time. When the Government undertakes to do anything no slight obstacle will prevent its progress, but in this matter no real obstacles exist.

We had quite a talk with Captain Evins, now engaged on the work, last week, and he says he can clear the river of snags in one season, but the main work will come in the constructing of levees to confine the current to one stream. He furthermore says, when this is done, a channel of 2 to 2½ feet deep can be secured the year round, and be better, in fact, in low water than at a high stage. Several boats have already been built at Little Rock ostensibly for this trade, and Captain Cotton, whom our citizens will remember made a trip up the river to this place some years since, has constructed a boat, expressly for this trip, 20 x 100 feet, with good machinery, cabin, etc., and will take advantage of the first raise in the river, to make a start for Arkansas City.

No stronger proof of the Government's determination to push this project to a successful completion is needed than afforded by the U. S. Snag Boat "Wichita," now lying in the Arkansas river, some 75 miles below this city, near Pawnee Agency, Indian Territory. This boat was built at Little Rock, Arkansas, by Capt. Handbury, Corps of Engineers, U. S. A., for the sole purpose of removing snags, overhanging timber, and other obstructions from the Arkansas river above Fort Smith, and is to be exclusively used on this portion of the river.

It will perhaps give our readers some idea of this vessel if we append a short description of the mode of construction, machinery, and adaptability to the ends for which she was built. The hull of the boat is composed of hard, all heart, white oak wood, cut in the vicinity of Little Rock, and is of the following dimensions.

Length 125 feet, beam 26 feet, depth of hold 3 feet, carrying capacity, 250 tons, and when loaded with a full crew, all the machinery and rations for three months on board, draws but fifteen inches of water. She has two 85 horsepower high pressure engines, with cylinders 8½ inches in diameter, and a stroke of 36 inches. Two steel boilers, 16 feet long and 3 feet in diameter, with two 10-inch and two 8-inch return flues in each. Her main shaft is 5 feet in diameter and 21 feet in length, and the propelling wheel is 12 x 17 feet. Also a steam doctor and pumps for supplying the boilers with water. For snagging, there are two more engines, cylinders 6 x 12, working at right angles to run the capstan, and in addition a derrick and boom with a hoisting capacity of 45 tons.

Accommodations on board this boat are equal to those in the best of river steamers, consisting of a neatly stained cabin, fitted with all modern conveniences, 8 state rooms, 8 x 8. The cook house, servants' cabin, bath and wash house, and closets are detached from the main cabin. A complete outfit of rigging, etc., with three months rations for the full crew, which consists of Capt. Joseph Evins, under whose superintendence the boat was built, commanding mate, 2 engineers, carpenter, watchman, clerk, sailor, 2 cooks, laundryman, fireman, 2 cabin boys, and 16 deck hands--making 30 in all.

There are over 200 feet of hose on board with hot and cold water connections in case of fire or any needed use. In a days run upstream with an average speed of 8 miles a hour, she will consume about 4 cord of hard wood.

Captain Evins says if he had started two days sooner from Little Rock, he could have made Arkansas City easily, but as things now stand, he will most probably drop back to Fort Gibson and await the spring rise to come up.

A party of our citizens accompanied the Captain, upon invitation, to inspect his vessel, and see, themselves, the preparations made for prosecuting this undertaking. Captain Evins is very sanguine as to the speedy success of the enterprise he is engaged upon, and with so intelligent and energetic an officer in command, we think the "Wichita" will make a good record in the annals of Arkansas River navigation.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 4, 1882.

Capt. Evins, of the snag boat, Wichita, spent several days of last week in our town.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 4, 1882.

Mayor Kellogg, James Benedict, and T. McIntire, in company with Capt. Evins, started last Friday to visit the Government Snag Boat at Pawnee Agency.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 4, 1882.

Kansas prairie hay retails at $18 per ton at Little Rock, Arkansas, and has the credit of being the best hay in their markets. When the steamboat comes up next spring, some of the surplus hay might be disposed of.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 11, 1882.

Capt. Evins, of the Snag boat, "Wichita," is absent at his home in Arkansas, on leave of absence. He will return in about three weeks.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 11, 1882.

Notice.
A public meeting will be held in I. H. Bonsall's office at 8 o'clock this evening, at which the committee that accompanied Cap. Evins, and made an examination of the Snag Boat, "Wichita," will hand in their report. All interested in this matter should make a point of attending, and hear the different views entertained on this subject.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

Boom for the Steamboat.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

Steamboat meeting tonight.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

Attend the Steamboat meeting to be held at Bonsall's office this evening at 8 o'clock.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

Turn Out! Turn Out!!
A Steamboat meeting will be held at the office of I. H. Bonsall this Wednesday evening, at 8 o'clock, to organize a plan of action relative to obtaining an appropriation for improving the Arkansas River. This is a matter of vital importance, and our people will consult their own best interests by attending. Be on hand and help the "steamboat boom."

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

At the present low stage of water in the Arkansas River, large boats are still navigating it as far as Fort Gibson, as will be seen by the following item from the Cherokee Advocate.

"The steamboat `Fort Smith' arrived at the Fort Gibson wharf on the 28th ult., loaded with salt and departed with a cargo of cotton."

[CRESWELL CORRESPONDENT: "O."]

Winfield Courier, January 19, 1882.

The party of four who went down with Capt. Evins to take a look at the U. S. Snag boat "Wichita," now lying east of Pawnee Agency, have returned and made their report that she is there, and will come up when they have a sixteen inch rise in the river.

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, January 25, 1882. Editorial Page.

The Arkansas River.
The matter of improving and rendering the above stream navigable is now being agitated in earnest by our most influential citizens. Our members of Congress and Representatives have been corresponded with, and one and all express themselves as in favor of the measure, and in every way willing to exert themselves to the utmost to gain the desired aid in the way of the necessary appropriations. In connection with this we publish, below, a letter from Capt. Thos. H. Handbury, Corps of Engineers, U. S. A., to Dr. Kellogg, which is full of information upon this project, and should be read by all our people.

LITTLE ROCK, ARKANSAS,
JANUARY 20, 1882.
Hon. H. D. Kellogg, Mayor.

DEAR SIR:

Your note of the 16th inst., relative to the improvement of the upper Arkansas River, is at hand, and I take great pleasure in replying at once, seeing that I can give you some facts of interest in regard to this work which you seem not to be in possession of.

In February, 1869, Major Luter, Corps of Engineers, U. S. A., reported to the Chief of Engineers in Washington, D. C., the results of a reconnaissance of the Arkansas River between Fort Smith, Arkansas, and Wichita, Kansas, that he had been instructed to have made. His Assistant, J. D. McKown, who made the reconnaissance, submitted a rough approximate estimate of the cost of permanently improving the river. Major Luter did not deem it advisable to commit the Government to an expenditure of so large an amount as this estimate called for without some more definite data and statistical information than could be obtained by a mere reconnaissance of the river. In order to thoroughly study the problem and to develop a plan which would most economically and most radically improve the river for all time, he deemed it best that a thorough instrumental survey should be made, extending from Wichita, Kansas, to Fort Gibson, Indian Territory, where it would join to one previously made from that point to Little Rock, Arkansas.

In connection with this the data could be collected for an elaborate report such as Senator Plumb refers to in his communication to you. For this purpose he estimated that an appropriation of $16,360 would be necessary and recommended that it be made. This recommendation has been renewed every year since and laid before Congress.

In the report above referred to, Major Luter says:

"The estimates presented by Assistant McKown are for removing snags and rocks and so contracting the width of the stream as to give at low water a depth of about 2 feet, but this estimate is only a rough approximation at the best, and no work on this scale should be undertaken, even if deemed advisable, until a thorough survey of the stream has been made, the cost of which has been estimated at $16,360.

"I am however of the opinion that by removing the snags and constructing slight dams at some of the worst shoals, the navigation would be so improved as to render it as good as that between Little Rock and Fort Smith, and this would seem to be all that is worth doing until the general improvement of the river is undertaken. The cost of this work would be about $100,000, which could be expended in one season."

Whatever plan of permanent improvement be adopted, there is certain preliminary work such as the removal of snags, rocks, over-hanging trees, etc., that must be done. This affords temporary relief for the commerce seeking this outlet and is absolutely necessary. It is for this work that the estimate of $100,000 is made, and to it the funds that are from time to time appropriated by Congress are devoted. My own estimate for the next fiscal year is $30,000 and also $16,300 for the survey, making in all $46,300.

This estimate, with my report and recommendations, is now before Congress.

No plan has as yet been recommended for the permanent improvement of the Arkansas River, for the simple reason that we have not the data upon which to base intelligent conclusions as to what is best to be done. To devise a plan for the permanent improvement of a stream of so much importance as the Arkansas River is destined to be, running as it does between hills and through plains unsurpassed in natural wealth by any in the world and which is going to affect the development of this wealth, is a problem of no small importance and should be undertaken only with every possible data bearing upon the subject at hand. To collect these data it requires money, and it is that which is meant when we estimate $16,300 for the survey of the Arkansas River between Fort Gibson and Wichita.

In this connection it is well, perhaps, to refer to a point that is usually made by members of Congress, and rightly, too, as the law requires it, when a new work of improvement is to be undertaken. They desire reliable statistical information, showing what interests are to be affected and to what extent, and they naturally look for this to the Engineer Officer submitting the project for the improvement. He very often, as in this case, has no means of collecting this other than through the liberality of public spirited citizens, or those more or less pecuniarily interested in the success of the undertaking.

If the citizens of a community liable to be affected by a contemplated river improvement for which an appropriation is to be asked of Congress would make it a point to furnish the Engineer Officer, for his report, all reliable statistical information available bearing upon the improvement proposed, I have no doubt but little difficulty would be experienced in obtaining any reasonable appropriation asked for. As a general thing it is almost entirely upon the report of this officer that Congress makes an appropriation for River or Harbor improvements. Respectfully, yours truly,

THOS. H. HANDBURY, Capt. Corps of Engineers.

 

Arkansas City Traveler, February 1, 1882.

Capt. Evins, of snag boat "Wichita," was in the city last week. The Capt. says his arrival at Arkansas City with the "Wichita" is certain.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 1, 1882.

H. P. Standley, Editor and Proprietor, together with Stacy Matlack, C. F. France and Capt. Evins, of the "gun boat Wichita," are in the Territory hunting. We've engaged the dears. The other animals are as yet unengaged.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

Messrs. S. Matlack, C. Mead, C. L. France, of Toledo, Ohio, and ye editor returned to the city on Sunday last from their trip to the Territory and the Snag Boat "Wichita" after having had a most delightful week's recreation. The members of the party are under obligation to Capt. Evins, of the Wichita, the first mate, Mr. Treline, and the engineer, Mr. Matthews, for the courtesies extended to them while on their vessel, which were duly appreciated and would be gladly reciprocated should occasion offer.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

Mr. Charles Williams, Asst. Engineer on the Snag Boat "Wichita" spent several days in our city this week. He returned to the Wichita yesterday, taking down a lot of stores and other government property upon a flat boat. The trip will probably take three or four days if the weather is favorable.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 22, 1882.

PUBLIC SALE.
A BOILER ENGINE AND FERRY BOAT will be sold to the highest and best bidder, at Public Auction, for cash, at Pawnee Agency, on Tuesday, the 21st day of March, 1882.

E. H. BOWMAN, U. S. Indian Agent.
Cowley County Courant, March 2, 1882.

Arkansas City is contemplating putting a small boat on the Arkansas River, to ply between that city and Geuda Springs. That would be a pretty nice scheme, and would probably be as satisfactory as a steamer running from Little Rock.

[U. S. SNAG BOAT "WICHITA" LYING AT MOUTH OF THE CIMARRON.]

Arkansas City Traveler, May 3, 1882. Editorial Page.

The U. S. snag boat, "Wichita," is lying at the mouth of the Cimarron unable to get down the Arkansas, as she draws 14 inches and there is only six in the river. They have been lying there for six weeks, but expect soon to get down in consequence of the usual spring rise. The Captain says surveyors will soon start down from Arkansas City to determine the practicability of the jetty system for making the river navigable; and if it can be done, work will begin inside of a year. He also thinks it feasible, saying at a cost of $2,000,000 a three foot channel could be made thirty feet wide, taking about five years to complete it. Kansas wants this done, as it will give her cheaper rates on Wood and coal, and afford transportation direct to the seaboard for her wheat, corn, etc. After getting down, the "Wichita" will work for the next year improving the river between Fort Gibson and Fort Smith. Indian Journal.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 7, 1882.

The U. S. snag boat, Wichita, is now at work in the Arkansas between Fort Smith and the M. K. & T. railroad.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 8, 1882.

Another Boat for Ft. Smith.
Mr. Charles and Frank Gilkey, of Maple City, Kansas, left this place this week for a voyage down the Arkansas river. They have a boat 8 by 16 feet, drawing five inches of water, and all the necessary rigging for sailing. They take guns and traps with them and expect to spend some time hunting along the banks of the river where game is abundant. The TRAVELER will be favored with a communication now and then showing their progress.

 

1883
Arkansas City Traveler, February 28, 1883.

Frank Stedman and Ed. Parish have built a boat and intend making a business of fishing for the next three months. They intend shipping fish to foreign markets.

 

1884
Winfield Courier, May 1, 1884.

SCISSORED PARAGRAPHS.
Interesting Items Gathered From Our Neighboring Exchanges.
OXFORD REGISTER.
The river surveyors unceremoniously cut through the mill dam, to take their boats through, damaging it to the amount of about $300.

Two boats, carrying about twenty-two government surveyors, are anchored about a mile north of the bridge. The object, they say, is to straighten the river if possible, but it seems that the government has taken this mode to use the money appropriated for the improvement of the Arkansas River. This is the third time they have surveyed the river and nothing of any importance has been done.

Arkansas City Traveler, May 7, 1884.

River Survey.
We received a pleasant call last Monday from Capt. Burrowes and Lieut. F. P. Spalding, who have been lying near our city, on the Arkansas River, waiting instructions the past three days. From these gentlemen we gather the following particulars with reference to the survey which is under the direction of Major M. B. Adams, of the U. S. Corps of engineers, with Capt. Burrowes in charge and Lieut. Spalding as assistant, with a force of twenty men. Mr. E. B. Adams is levelman and Mr. M. A. Orlopp recorder of the expedition. The object is to definitely settle the feasibility of the navigation of the Arkansas River between Fort Gibson and this city and possibly Wichita; and the length of river over which the present survey will extend is 315 miles and will take about five months to complete. The corps left Wichita March 31, and to this point report plenty of water. Considerable delay was caused by the west Arkansas River Bridge here, which was so low that it necessitated the removal of the cabin from the boat before it was possible to pass. No difficulty whatever was experienced in going over the dam. In fact, the boys seemed to appreciate the run. Yesterday morning they bade adieu and by this time we presume are within the bounds of the Indian Territory.

Arkansas City Republican, May 10, 1884.

We had the pleasure of meeting Capt. F. T. Burrowes, civil engineer, who under the direction of Maj. M. B. Adams, of the U. S. Engineer Corps, was ordered from the lower Mississippi--his former base of operations--to proceed to Wichita, and take charge of the surveying expedition at that point. The task assigned to Capt. Burrowes is to survey the Arkansas River from Wichita, Kansas, to Little Rock, Arkansas, for the purpose of determining the feasibility of making this stream navigable. The aim being to bring the matter before congress at as early a day as possible for the necessary appropriations to make the stream navigable from Little Rock up. Capt. Burrowes said from what he had learned of the river below to Arkansas City that he was satisfied that it could be made navigable for the most of the year, but that it would be hard to make it navigable above this place. The Captain expressed himself as greatly surprised at our growth and prosperity. Our canal and mills were a source of wonder to him. His outfit consists of two flat boats, 12 x 40 feet each, well equipped with all the necessaries of life, as well as instruments requisite for this kind of work, and last but not least, a crew of 20 as jolly, hale, well-met young men as anyone could care to meet in his travels. After replenishing their stock of supplies from Ward & Pickering's supply store, they started down the river Wednesday. Success to you, boys, and may we all meet again under as pleasant circumstances is all the harm we can do you.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1884.

The North Fork for the past two weeks has been higher than before known for several years. With the first rise went downstream the ferry-boat which the military so kindly furnished, and until a skiff could be made, the mails were stopped and travel of all kinds impeded. Quite a number of large cow outfits en route to the roundups were several days delayed at the Agency on account of the high water. Cheyenne Transporter.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 18, 1884.

Navigation.
Mr. F. T. Burrowes, the United States engineer who recently passed down the Arkansas River in charge of a surveying party, writes from Pawnee Agency, under date of June 9, as follows.

"For the last two weeks we have found a regular steamboat river at the present stage of water, and if this stage would only continue for six months in the year, Arkansas City could be made the head of navigation at moderate expense."

Winfield Courier, September 18, 1884.

A Mysterious Case.
Mr. T. C. Price and David Nicholson, of Vernon, were out on the Arkansas River Sunday grape-hunting; and in a secluded place, came across a boat sunk in the sand, and on the bank was a small show case with a number of pipes, a cigar, and several plugs of tobacco inside. A little further on was a wagon-sheet, a quilt, and a woolen blanket. In another place was found a lady's shawl with a name, "Amelia Barnard," on it. In other places scattered about in the bushes and along the bank were found coffee, sugar, bacon, and cooking utensils. Everything indicated that the things had lain there some time. The oars belonging to the boat were found nearby. The case is a mysterious one and the many things scattered around indicated great haste. The boys are making further search and will unravel it, if possible.

Arkansas City Republican, October 11, 1884.

The Arkansas to be Made Navigable.
At the miller's convention at Winfield several days ago, the question of making the Arkansas River navigable, was sprung. A new plan was discussed, by which it is hoped to be able to ship flour down the river. It is as follows: Flat-boats are to be built with a capacity of seven or eight tons; several of these will be coupled together, similar to railroad cars; at the front and rear, small steamboats will be attached, to furnish the propelling power. It is hoped that in this manner several tons of flour will be taken downstream. A committee, consisting of James Hill, Mr. Bliss, of Wood & Bliss, Winfield, and Mr. Hargus, of Hargus & Clark at Wellington, were appointed to investigate the plausibility of this scheme. As soon as possible, these gentlemen will go down the Arkansas, and if they find water to the depth of one foot all the way, this plan will be put into execution. The boats they contemplate building will draw about 8 inches of water, and will be controlled by our millers.

Should this plan be executed, it will be of great benefit to Arkansas City. The flour from Wichita, Douglass, Wellington, and Winfield will come here for shipment.

Every farmer is interested in this enterprise. Every mechanic will be profited. Every man building a house, and in fact all will be benefitted if these enterprising men should be successful. When the boats return, they can bring lumber, fuel, and other necessaries, which of course will give us a cheapening of freight rates.

[EXCHANGES.]

Winfield Courier, October 16, 1884.

The A. C. Republican chronicles another scheme for the unraveling of a knotty problem: "At the millers' convention at Winfield several days ago, the question of making the Arkansas River navigable was sprung. A new plan was discussed, by which it is hoped to be able to ship flour down the river. It is as follows: Flat-boats are to be built with a capacity of seven or eight tons; several of these will be coupled together similar to railroad cars; at the front and rear small steamboats will be attached, to furnish the propelling power. It is hoped that in this manner several tons of flour will be taken down stream. A committee consisting of James Hill, Mr. Bliss of Bliss & Wood, Winfield, and Mr. Hargus, of Hargus & Clark at Wellington, was appointed to investigate the plausibility of this scheme. As soon as possible these gentlemen will go down the Arkansas and if they find water to the depth of one foot all the way, this plan will be put into execution. The boats they contemplate building will draw about eight inches of water, and will be controlled by our millers.

Arkansas City Republican, October 18, 1884.

Correspondence is being carried on between Jas. Hill and eastern parties relative to the cost of building boats for the purpose of going down the Arkansas.

[KANSAS MILLERS: WINFIELD, WELLINGTON, ARKANSAS CITY.]

Winfield Courier, November 6, 1884.

The millers of Winfield, Wellington, and Arkansas City have subscribed necessary funds to experiment on a project to establish a line of barges on the Arkansas River for the transportation of flour, grain, etc., to the head of steamboat navigation.

Arkansas City Republican, November 8, 1884.

The boat to be used in going down the Arkansas is completed. It was launched Wednesday, and Thursday the cabin was erected. Yesterday the crew, consisting of Engineer Moorhead, Frank Bealls, and others, departed on their venture down the river.

Arkansas City Republican, November 8, 1884.

Rev. I. N. Moorehead was here this week, visiting with his former parishioners. He was a guest of James Hill. Yesterday he took passage on the Miller boat down the Arkansas on a recreation trip, but will return in a few days. Mr. Moorehead was formerly pastor of the M. E. Church here, but is now stationed at Pueblo, Colorado. In the west he has been delivering a lecture entitled "The Real Power." His many friends have prevailed on him to deliver the same lecture here on Friday night, Nov. 14, in Highland Hall. An admission fee will be charged: 50 cents for reserved seats and 25 cents general admission.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 12, 1884.

The millers of Winfield, Wellington, and Arkansas City have subscribed funds to experiment on a project to establish a line of barges on the Arkansas River for the transportation of flour, grain, etc., to the head of steamboat navigation. Winfield Courier.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 12, 1884.

DOWN THE ARKANSAS. A boat having on board Wm. Moorhead, Harry Hill, Frank Landes, Howard Dayton, and _____ Bailey, left this city last Friday morning to make a survey of the river, looking to the feasibility of establishing a line of barges from here to the head of navigation. Rev. I. N. Moorehead also accompanied them for a short distance.

Winfield Courier, November 13, 1884.

Engineer R. S. Moorhead and crew will start in a few days down the Arkansas in a boat furnished by the millers of Arkansas City and Winfield. Their object is to ascertain whether the Arkansas can be opened for practical navigation. The prime mover in this enterprise is Mr. J. Hill of our city. Mr. Hill has engineered several enterprises which at first seemed to promise no success to successful results, and while everyone is incredulous there can be but one prayer for the success of the great work. A. C. Democrat.

Arkansas City Republican, November 22, 1884.

River Transportation.
The improvement and navigation of the upper Arkansas River is of the utmost importance to the business interests of Fort Smith. Lack of adequate railroad facilities and the absence of competition between lines of transportation is a great disadvantage to our city. Looking to this improvement of the river, a survey was made some time since of the stream from Arkansas City, Kansas, to Fort Smith, and a company is being formed of the prominent businessmen of Arkansas City, and it is to be hoped of Fort Smith, to place a line of light steamers on the river to ply between the two cities. The boats are intended to draw only about 12 inches of water and this can be found almost all the year. Furthermore, an appropriation can be secured from congress to place the river in first rate navigable condition, and thus insure the permanency and prosperity of the proposed enterprise.

The advantages to Fort Smith's shipping interest is made plain when it is known that it now costs, by rail, one dollar per barrel to ship flour from Arkansas City, when the same can be shipped by river for about forty cents. This line of shipping would place us in direct communication with the rich wheat fields and fine cattle range of Kansas. Let the matter be agitated and the company--in part--be formed at this place. It will be a big thing for Fort Smith. Fort Smith Tribune.

Mr. Beall in a letter from Little Rock says he saw the government surveyor at Little Rock, having just completed surveying to that point, and was assured that we would have no trouble in our plan of navigating the river.

 

 

[PLEASANT VALLEY. -- "COUNTRY JAKE."]

Winfield Courier, December 4, 1884.

The next on list of Cowley's enterprises is rafting flat boats down the Arkansas River to the point of steamboat navigation. Some of Arkansas City's men of industry are taking hold of the enterprise. The river has been surveyed, and reports are favorable. There are eleven flats being built at Arkansas City now for shipping agricultural produce. If they don't look out, the river will be frozen up, then they will have to move their boats on bob-sleds.

Arkansas City Republican, December 6, 1884.

In another column will be found a report of the "Aunt Sally" coming up the Arkansas. She came up the Walnut to just east of our city. People went wild that day over the occasion. It was on Sunday and the congregation of churches were sadly depleted. Fred Farrar was one of the non-curious. He attended services. The "Aunt Sally" was loaded down with spectators. Judge Bonsall took a view of the boat with some 300 souls on board. It was a gala day and will long be remembered by our citizens.

Arkansas City Republican, December 6, 1884.

Navigation of the Upper Arkansas River.
The question of utilizing that vast, though ever-changing current of water known as the Upper Arkansas River, flowing through our state from northwest to southeast, and making it the highway to a southern market, has been a living project with the enterprising agricultural people of Cowley, Sumner, Sedgwick, and those counties lying along and contiguous thereto, ever since the first settlement of that fertile valley in 1870. Owing to their remote distance from a railroad or a market, and the consequent cost of transporting the vast surplus of wheat raised in Cowley and Sumner, has this matter been of vital interest to the people living within their borders. The subject has been discussed in the field and in the grange, has been the slogan of the country politician and the shibboleth of the farmers. It has been resolved upon by the conscientious, petitioned for by representatives, and memorialized by our state legislature until congress has taken the matter under consideration, and appointed a commission of competent engineers to personally visit, examine, and report on the feasibility of opening up the stream for navigation, from some point near the terminus of the Wichita branch of the Santa Fe railroad to Little Rock, Arkansas.

In view of these facts, a brief account of the local and individual efforts to solve the problem will doubtless be of interest. During the fall of 1875, A. W. Burkey and A. C. Winton, of Cowley County, built a small flat-boat at Arkansas City, loaded it with flour, and started town the river, bound for Little Rock. While they may not have seen the "unexplored wilderness" that lay between DeSota and the dream of [CANNOT READ NEXT WORD...THINK IT IS A MAN'S NAME], or the dangers that beset Coronado in his march of disappointment through undiscovered Kansas, to encounter yet four hundred and fifty miles of an unknown river, guarded by semi-barbarous people who had no particular good feeling towards a frontiersman, laying between them and civilization, presented anything but a cheerful outlook for this pioneer voyage. The trip was made, however, without misadventure, and in a reasonable length of time. The produce disposed of, the navigators returned overland to Arkansas City, and reported a fair depth of water and a lively current from the state line to Fort Gibson.

On the strength of this report, a joint stock company was immediately organized, and an agent appointed to proceed at once to the Ohio river and purchase a suitable steamer to ply between the points named. A light draught wharf packet was procured, and a point known as Webber' Falls, between Little Rock and Fort Gibson reached on her upward trip. Here it was found that her engines were of insufficient power to stem the current, so she was taken back to Little Rock, and there sold at a loss to her owners of twenty-five hundred dollars.

This failure temporarily dampened the ardor of even the enthusiastic pathfinders, and nothing further was attempted until the summer of 1878, when Messrs. W. H. Speers and Amos Walton, two leading public spirited citizens of the county, equipped a "ferry flat" with a 10 horsepower threshing machine engine, and by several trips up and down the river for a distance of 60 miles from Arkansas City, demonstrated beyond a doubt that a steamer could be successfully propelled on the Arkansas River at any season of the year. The flat was fifty feet long, sixteen feet wide, and drew ten inches of water. This novel little craft visited Grouse Creek, the Walnut River, Salt City, the Kaw Indian Agency, Oxford, and other points along the river, and attracted crowds of people wherever it went. At Oxford a public reception was tendered its officers and crew. These experimental trips were all made while the river was at its lowest stage, and prior to the annual "June rise."

Soon after this, and while the "ferry flat" was still prominently before the public, Mr. I. H. Bonsall, an experienced engineer and prominent citizen of Arkansas City, corresponded with the businessmen of Little Rock, and induced them to send a boat on a trial trip to the upper country. The little steamer, "Aunt Sally," a tug built for the deep, sluggish bayous of Arkansas, and used in the local cotton trade there, was selected and manned for the purpose. Though not designed for swift water, this crude little steamer made the complete voyage, and, in command of Captains Lewis and Baker, with Mr. [NAME OBSCURED] as pilot, landed safely at Arkansas City, and was moored there, in the Walnut River, Sunday morning, June 30th, 1878. The officers reported sufficient water and a safe current for light draught steamers for the entire distance, and expressed themselves of the opinion that a boat built especially for the purpose could run regularly between the two states every day in the year.

Soon after the "Aunt Sally" returned south, Henry and Albert Pruden, and O. J. Palmer, of Salt City, Sumner County, started for Little Rock with a "ferry flat" loaded with seven hundred bushels of wheat. The wheat was sold at a good round figure, and the gentlemen returned, reporting a successful trip and a good stage of water.

On their return, the businessmen of Arkansas City, finding that steamboat owners in the lower country were not disposed to adventure up so far with their boats, resolved to build a steamer themselves, and with it make regular trips between their city and the Indian agencies in the Territory. After several attempts to find men of experience to take the matter in charge, McCloskey Seymore secured the service of Mr. Cyrus Wilson, who began the building of a boat for the purposes named.

Wednesday afternoon, November 6, 1878, the "Cherokee," the first steamboat ever built in Kansas, was successfully launched at Arkansas City. The hull of this boat is 83 feet long, 18 feet wide on the bottom, and 85 feet long, and 18 feet wide on the boiler deck; beam, 22 feet, with guards extending 2 feet around a model bow. She carries two twenty horsepower engines, and with all her machinery draws less than eight inches of water, and, when loaded to the guards, will not draw over sixteen inches. The shallowest water found on the bars between Wichita and Little Rock during the lowest stage of the river was eighteen inches. From this it will be seen that the "Cherokee" will answer the purposes for which it was built, and be of great service in transporting the supplies from these counties to the Indian agencies lying south and east of Arkansas City.

With the Arkansas River open for navigation, and a good line of boats and barges making regular trips from Arkansas City, business of all kinds will receive a fresh impetus in Southern Kansas. There will be no railroad monopolies, no "pooling of earnings," and no forming of combinations to affect the interest of the producers. The farmers of this locality will then have a highway of their own by which they can exchange their surplus wheat, flour, and corn for the coal and lumber of the Lower Arkansas.

---
We furnish this bit of navigation reminiscence to our readers to show what has been done to make the Arkansas navigable. It is taken from the biennial report of the state board of Agriculture. The scheme which has now been made practicable by our millers was contemplated and experimented on as early as 1875. It will be seen that "Aunt Sally" made a successful voyage and her officers pronounced sufficient water and a safe current for light draught steamers for the entire distance, such as our millers are now building. Mr. Moorehead will remain in Arkansas City for a short time and then go east to pay a visit. His next trip will be up the Arkansas on the millers boat, which is now being constructed. He has no doubts whatever but what we will be shipping merchandise down the river within 60 days. It will be a great day when that occurs. The failure of the "Cherokee" and others to make a successful trip was because they were not constructed properly. They were not built for such shallow water.

Winfield Courier, December 11, 1884.

ARKANSAS CITY DEMOCRAT.
Engineer Moorhead returned Tuesday after his trip down the Arkansas River. He is sanguine of the success of the scheme for the practical navigation of the river. He thinks that an iron power boat drawing about twelve inches of water and similar to those employed on the St. Lawrence can successfully run between Arkansas City and Gibson. The boats can load with grain and return with coal and timber. Mr. Jas. Hill, who is now in Chicago, will ascertain the kind of boat which will best answer the purpose and if he receives encouraging advice from those experienced in river navigation will purchase an experimental boat.

Arkansas City Traveler, December 17, 1884.

W. M. Sleeth started to St. Louis last Friday to meet James Hill. These gentlemen expect to purchase the boat for the river while there.

Arkansas City Republican, December 20, 1884.

Maj. W. M. Sleeth and Jas. Hill returned from St. Louis Thursday. They inspected a number of boats for use on the Arkansas, and then came home to report to the Navigation Company. A boat which had been used on the Red River in Texas proved conclusively that a like boat could be used on the Arkansas. It was 18 x 100 feet, with 100 horsepower and drew 12 inches of water. Messrs. Sleeth and Hill thought it was best to be on the safe side and came to the wise conclusion to try a boat of smaller capacity but the same propelling power. A boat drawing ten inches of water and 15 x 75 feet. These gentlemen are going to make sure this time in getting the right kind of a boat; demonstrating that small steamers can be made to pay and then larger ones will be utilized.

Arkansas City Republican, December 20, 1884.

The latest scheme is to make the Arkansas River navigable. We reprint a former report published in the REPUBLICAN November 19.

"The scheme of navigating the Arkansas River between this city and Little Rock has proven better than the most sanguine had anticipated. Some two weeks ago a flat boat and crew with Engineer Moorhead in command started down the Arkansas River for the purpose of ascertaining the feasibility of navigating the stream. This was brought about by a desire of cheap freight rates to the south on the flour by our millers. The cruise down the river was easily accomplished, and plenty of water was found all the way. From here to the mouth of the Cimarron River, boats drawing eighteen inches of water can be used. From there on down the water is sufficient to carry any boat that may be utilized. The crew and boat returned Tuesday night and Engineer Moorhead has sent in his report. On Wednesday the projectors met and talked the matter over. Thursday at another meeting the following directors were elected: Jas. Hill, W. M. Sleeth, C. A. Bliss of Winfield, V. M. Ayres, and C. H. Searing. A charter has been granted in the name of the Arkansas River Navigation company. Thursday morning it was decided by the stockholders to send Jas. Hill and Maj. W. M. Sleeth east for the purpose of purchasing the power boat, and enough lighters to form a fleet. They left on the afternoon train. The flat boats will be built as quickly as possible, capable of carrying thirteen tons of flour each. Messrs. Sleeth and Hill are in the east negotiating for the power boat.

Excerpt...

Arkansas City Republican, December 20, 1884.

ARKANSAS CITY.
OUR ANNUAL REVIEW OF THE CITY AND BUSINESS FIRMS.
LANDES, BEALL & CO.
are the proprietors of the lower stone flouring mill on the canal. This mill was built during 1883. The building is five stories high, all of stone. It cost some $65,000, for machinery and building. About $55,000 capital is required to keep this huge piece of machinery in operation. It is the flouring mill of the southwest. An average daily run of 250 barrels of flour is turned out. The Crescent Patent is their leading brand. The Morning Star is the favorite, and the third brand is Old Gold. As to the merits of these different grades of flour, the large wholesale trade carried on by Messrs. Landes, Beall & Co., simply testifies. Daily they make large shipments to the west and southwest: Kansas, Arkansas, Texas, and many other states are supplied with flour by the mill. Owing to their large southern trade, the demand for lower freight rates to that region has caused these gentlemen to enter prominently in the scheme of navigating the Arkansas River between here and Little Rock. Should the height of their ambition be reached and a line of steamers be kept constantly plying between the two above named points, then their southern wholesale trade will be increased three fold. This firm alone averages shipments of 200 barrels of flour per day, and as the demand for their flour grows, so will the firm of Landes, Beall & Co., increase their facilities for making it. They are men of enterprise and will succeed when others fail. To the world at large, the REPUBLICAN cheerfully recommends this firm and their flour.

[MILLERS CONVENTION AT BRETTUN.]

Winfield Courier, December 25, 1884.

Millers Convention.
The millers of this and adjoining counties met in convention at the Brettun House in this city Tuesday and, we understand, put flour down in harmony with surrounding circumstances, making a discount of twenty-five cents on the hundred pounds. They also talked over the Arkansas River navigation scheme. A boat drawing ten inches of water and 15 x 75 feet in size will be put on as an experiment. If small steamers can be made to pay, they will try larger ones.

 

1885
Arkansas City Republican, January 10, 1885.

The Navigation company assembled in the parlors of the Leland Hotel Wednesday and talked over the scheme of navigating the Arkansas. Mr. Wood, of Wood & Bliss of Winfield, was in attendance. The company empowered Jas. Hill with a permit to have a propelling boat constructed immediately, and we understand that Mr. Hill will go east for that purpose next week. Soon he will know our fate. The river has been surveyed and Mr. Moorhead says emphatically that a boat can be run on the Arkansas. By the time navigation is opened up, we will be ready for our pork packing establishment. Messrs. Prescott, Duncan & Barnett want to be looking a "leetle out," or our steamboat will whistle before they are ready to ship their pork to the southwest.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 14, 1885.

Messrs. Wood, of Winfield, Ayres, Mead, Landes, Beall, and Sleeth met at the Leland Hotel Wednesday last, to perfect drawings and specifications for the Arkansas River boat, soon to be built in St. Louis. The size of this boat will be 16 feet wide and 75 feet long, being forty horsepower. The boat will be completed in about sixty days.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, January 15, 1885.

The Arkansas river navigation company held another meeting at Arkansas City last week. Mr. B. F. Wood, of the Winfield Roller Mills, represented this city. The company empowered James Hill to have a propelling boat constructed immediately, and Mr. Hill will likely go east for that purpose this week. The river has been surveyed and engineer Moorhead says emphatically that boats of right proportions can be run on the Arkansas. Thus will the "Nile of America" succumb to enterprise and grit.

Arkansas City Republican, January 17, 1885.

A movement is on foot to organize a stock company to build an excursion boat to be run between Arkansas City and Little Rock.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 21, 1885.

Arkansas City is still discussing the navigation of the Arkansas. They say it can be done. When they make a success of it, we shall move for a congressional appropriation and seek water navigation of the Walnut to Douglass. Tribune.

You will have to begin moving for the appropriation immediately then as the boat is ordered and under fair way to completion now. As soon as things open up permanently this spring, you can come down and hear her "toot."

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, January 24, 1885.

TO NAVIGATE, IS WHAT THE MILLERS
HAVE DECIDED TO DO WITH THE ARKANSAS.
But 60 Days to Expire Until Our Denizens Are Visited By a
Real Genuine Shallow Water Steamer.
One and All sanguine that the Arkansas will be Made Navigable
On the Plan Proposed by Civil Engineer Moorhead.
Mr. Moorhead Goes to St. Louis to Order the Construction of A Propelling Boat;
WHICH WILL BE HERE IN 60 DAYS.
Tuesday Ben. Woods, of Winfield, representing Bliss & Woods, came down and with the stockholders in the navigation company here, held another meeting in the parlors of the Leland Hotel. For some weeks they have been investigating the Arkansas River, and on the day mentioned above crowned their endeavors by issuing a decree for T. S. Moorhead to proceed immediately to St. Louis and order the construction of a shallow water steamer. The steamer will be used in propelling lighters loaded with freight down the Arkansas to Little Rock. Last Monday our Millers received plans and specifications of a shallow water steamer, from a St. Louis firm, which were adopted at the meeting Tuesday with the exception of a few slight changes. The plans adopted are as follows. The steamer is to be 75 feet in length and the beam 15 feet. The hold will be three feet. It is to be a stern-wheeler with two engines of 70 horsepower. Without cargo, it will draw less than 12 inches of water. The engine room at the rear and quarters for the crew and the pilot house at the front compose the compartments of the steamer. No accommodations will be made for passenger traffic. Mr. Moorhead will be in the east until the steamer is completed. Then he will sail down the Mississippi to the mouth of the Arkansas, and thence up the river to the head of navigation: Arkansas City.

Mr. Moorhead is a thorough engineer; he has surveyed the river, finding 10-inches of water all the way down, and has pronounced it navigable, and now he proposes to verify his assertions. The steamer will be running the river trail, and the overhanging trees removed. Lighters will then be built on which the flour is to be conveyed down the river. When our steamer comes sailing up, it will be an "epoch."

Arkansas City Republican, January 31, 1885.

T. S. Moorhead left for St. Louis Monday. He was unable to go Saturday last as was stated last week. No doubt but what work has already commenced on the steamboat by this time.

Excerpt from a very long article...

Winfield Courier, Thursday, February 5, 1885.

THE PROCEEDINGS IN DETAIL OF THE FARMERS' INSTITUTE
HELD IN WINFIELD ON JAN. 29 & 30.
FORESTRY.
An address delivered before the Farmers' Institute by J. F. MARTIN.
This brings me to the effects of forestry on navigation. Eighty years ago the hardy pioneers began cutting the timber from the banks of the Ohio river, and long ago its fertile banks, failing to receive the protection of the forest trees, through the agency of the freezing of winter and the washing of the stream, have been caving in, thus each year increases the distance between its banks; thus robbing the farmer of his best soil, which contributes to enlarge the sand-bar and islands of the river, and a portion is added to the delta on the gulf.

But these are not the worse results. As the stream has grown wider, the depth of the water has decreased, which has greatly aided in making navigation passable during the great part of the year to only the smaller class of boats. Had the primeval forests continued to line her banks, their washing away would not have occurred; or should they once more become fringed with willows or other suitable trees, the reduction of the banks would not only cease but the process of rebuilding would commence and appreciable difference in the depth of the channel would be observed. It would also add to, instead of diminish, the value of lands adjacent. I thus refer to the Ohio river, not because it is an isolated case, but because, for many years, I had abundant opportunities to witness these operations; and deplore the results. Like causes produce like effects, and other rivers are affected in a similar manner.

There are great causes operating against internal navigation, viz: The deficiency of a regular supply of water in the rivers, caused by the destruction of the forests at the sources of the streams; but I must confine this article to forestry on the banks of the rivers.

Other causes being the same, the depth of a stream will be proportioned to its width. Thus, if it averages one foot in depth, it will be two feet deep if it becomes contracted one-half; and this additional advantage would be secured, that this depth would be more likely to be continued than if the stream had remained at the previous depth. This law is, perhaps, generally understood; but how shall we apply it successfully to our navigable rivers? We cannot wall them in with brick and mortar. We cannot hem them in with a mighty frame work of sawed lumber. No, but man can exert almost miraculous power in fixing their boundaries by walls of forests. Obstructions on opposite banks, such as suitable trees, that will reduce the width of the stream, are the means, and the only means available to man that will ever permanently and sufficiently secure such rivers as the Arkansas and Missouri to navigation. Let the native willows be systematically planted and cared for along the banks of these rivers, and so managed that they will continue to encroach on stream until the desired width and consequent depth is secured, and the great object will be attained. Me thinks I heard someone say, "impossible." It is your privilege to exercise your judgment. But permit me to ask you to give it some careful thought. It has pleased the creator to place to man's use the powers of nature in combating like powers, and it seems plain to my mind that the mighty forces of forest growth are designed in this case to be utilized by man in fixing the banks of streams in such a way that their waters may be made available for the purpose of navigation. When this growth becomes permanent and the river becomes swollen above its artificial banks, in consequence of the sluggish condition of the water in and along the young timber, a deposit of sand, clay, leaves, etc., will take place, which will be repeated at each rising of the stream. At the same time, in consequence of the contraction of the banks, additional depth and also weight of water being secured, which accelerates the movement of the current, thus it plows a deeper channel and continually forces the movable sand, etc., toward either bank, thus the double operation is secured, viz: building up and fixing the banks, and furrowing out the channel. I might here give another outline of the plan of operations, but will defer it for the present. I believe this plan is entirely practicable, and the only one by which the Arkansas, Missouri, and like rivers can be utilized for purposes of navigation. Here is room for the exercise of a broad statesmanship. Here is an opportunity for the government to extend its helpful arm and confer untold blessings in the immediate future upon man, which blessings may continue to the end of time. Railroad men will sneer at these propositions; statesmen may think it rather dirty work for their dignity; and small politicians will not vociferate in their favor, except they see a prospect of inflating their purses thereby. In the meantime the industrial classes will continue to submit to the exactions of railroad and other monopolies until, through the power of a better education, they will rise in their might and demand of their servants proper attention to their best interests.

THE FIRST IRON STEAMSHIP AND STEAMBOAT.
Arkansas City Republican, February 7, 1885.

Paste This in Your Hat.
The first iron steamship was built in 1798.

The first steamboat plied the Hudson in 1807.

Arkansas City Republican, February 14, 1885.

Just after we went to press last week, word reached us that the dam across the Arkansas west of town had gone away. Also the bridge. It proved partly true. About 125 feet of the dam was carried away and about the same number of feet of the bridge was taken. The damage done to the dam cannot yet be estimated as the floating ice and high water will not permit a boat in its current. The water in the canal is so low that the flour mills have been stopped. Nothing can be done until the swollen waters subside and then quite a while will be consumed in repairing the break. The immense pressure of the ice against the bridge pilings caused them to give away and the dam, at the same time. This catastrophe will furnish several laborers employment for a time at good wages. "It's an ill wind that blows no one any good."

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, February 21, 1885.

Don't It Look Beautiful on Paper?
At a recent meeting of the Winfield Enterprise Association, its members signified their willingness to impose upon the township the task of giving $40,000 to aid in constructing the D. M. & A. Road, and if need be vote a like sum to secure the K. C. & S. Road. One gentleman, according to the Courier, also suggested the feasibility and possibility of offering sufficient inducements to the A. T. & S. F. and S. K. Railroads to build a union depot and joint shops in this city, and stated that the prospects of navigating the Arkansas River, and other influences, pointed forcibly to the necessity of the Santa Fe moving through the Territory soon to a southern market, in which case they must have shops about this location. Winfield being ninety-five miles from Cherryvale and about the same distance from Newton, offers a very advantageous situation for joint shops and a roundhouse, and if our businessmen push the feasibility of the matter, there seems no doubt that this can be obtained. When the D. M., & A., and K. C. & S. strikes us, now anticipated before the summer rolls by, this scheme will be all the more probable. With four railroads radiating from Winfield, with their shops here, we will have a town that will lay all others in Kansas in the shade--hardly excepting the state capital.

What imaginative minds the businessmen of Winfield possess. When the terminus of the Santa Fe is removed from here to Winfield, it will be when the earth ceases to revolve on its axis, and not before. We like to see Winfield prosper; but say, neighbors, don't steal our all. Don't take the terminus from us; don't pattern after our "little ditch" from the Arkansas to the Walnut; don't say you are at the head of navigation, oh, don't, please don't, you make us feel so bad. And, say, neighbors, when you get a town that lays all other towns in the shade, don't forget that we are planting trees down here, and are likely to be in the shades long before Winfield takes root.

Arkansas City Republican, March 21, 1885.

T. S. Moorhead, who came in Tuesday, informed a REPUBLICAN representative that the boat for the navigation of the Arkansas River would be completed in about three weeks. Work was under good headway when he came through St. Louis. With the advent of the Kansas City and Southwestern into Arkansas City, and the navigation of the Arkansas River this summer, won't the terminus boom?

Arkansas City Republican, March 21, 1885.

Yesterday forenoon Bliss & Wood, the Winfield millers, came down to hold a meeting with the members of the Arkansas River Navigation Company here. The meeting was held at the residence of John Landes.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 1, 1885.

Mr. Hill reports that the boat for the Arkansas River will be completed in two weeks, and will be brought here immediately after.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, April 23, 1885.

The Arkansas City Democrat says the new steamboat of the Arkansas River Navigation Company is now completed and lying at St. Louis ready to be brought to Arkansas City. Engineer Moorhead and Fred Barrett will soon start on their cruise from St. Louis. The boat will draw ten inches of water.

Arkansas City Traveler, April 29, 1885.

Steamboat Enterprise.
In Geuda Springs a stock company has been formed to run a steamboat between that place and Arkansas City. The directors chosen are George Ferris, J. H. Noble, Will M. Berkey, and B. F. Hall, of that city, and C. L. Swarts, Amos Walton, and A. V. Alexander, of Arkansas City. An investigation of the Arkansas River between the two points named, shows a course in no place less than fifteen inches deep, the shallowest place being found just south of the large island below the ferry. A boat 20 by 75 feet is to be built, with a draft of 12 inches. It is expected the boat will be ready to make trips two months from date.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, April 30, 1885.

The Saratoga of the West is bound to have some kind of a transportation line. The Geuda Springs News says that "a company was organized recently for the purpose of building a steam boat to ply on the river between that point and Arkansas City. The boat is to cost about three thousand dollars, and be capable of carrying seventy-five or a hundred passengers, and will make two trips daily. Messrs. Berkey, Noble, and Ferris made a trip down the river to examine the depth of the water, and they reported favorably. The building of the boat will commence soon."

RAILROADS AND "STEAMBOATS."
Winfield Courier, Thursday, May 14, 1885.

While a Beacon ambassador was coming up from Caldwell yesterday, he made the acquaintance of Mr. Jas. Hill, of Arkansas City. Mr. Hill is one of the company which is now building the railroad from Beaumont to Arkansas City. The company expects to have the road in running order about November 1st. The road is graded four or five miles west of Beaumont and rails will be laid this week. Mr. Hill says Arkansas City is very lively, and that the Arkansas River Navigation Company have already one boat built and launched in St. Louis, and will make her first trip about June 1st, and as soon as they get started nicely, they expect to put on fifteen or more boats, so as to have a boat leave Arkansas City every other day. The boats are built of steel plate, will be fifteen feet wide and seventy-five feet long, and notwithstanding their weight, will only draw one foot of water. Wichita Beacon.

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, May 27, 1885.

From our Exchanges.
Geuda Springs Herald: Our steamboat company have gone to work in earnest now. Mr. Amos Walton, the president of the association, was over to see the members of the board at the end of the route Wednesday. Arrangements were made to go to work soon. The engine and boiler will probably be purchased inside of two weeks.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, May 28, 1885.

The barge line between Geuda Springs and Arkansas City seems to be materializing. The Herald says: "Our steamboat company have gone to work in earnest now. Mr. Amos Walton, the president of the association, was over to see the members of the board at the end of the route Wednesday. Arrangements were made to go to work soon. The engine and boiler will probably be purchased inside of two weeks."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, June 4, 1885.

Engineer Moorhead informs us that the boat of the Arkansas River Navigation Company is completed at St. Louis and ready to be brought around by water to Arkansas City. It will cost seven thousand dollars laid down at the Terminus, and draws ten inches. The test of the navigable qualities of the "ragin' Arkansaw" will be made in the near future. The projectors feel confidence of the success of their experiment.

Arkansas City Traveler, June 10, 1885.

T. S. Moorhead started from St. Louis yesterday with the steamboat designed for navigation on the Arkansas River. The vessel is of light draft, drawing but twelve inches, 75 feet long with 16 feet length of beam, and cost $6,000. She is named the "Kansas Millers." Several steel barges, which she is designed to propel, accompany the vessel as towage. If the navigation of the river shall prove a success, as its projectors feel confident, the problem of cheap freight is solved.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, June 13, 1885.

OUR STEAMER.
The "Kansas Millers," Will Be Here For a Certainty.
July 4, 1885!
She Left St. Louis, Tuesday, June 9, for the Mouth of the Arkansas.
About 25 Days Will Elapse Ere the "Kansas Millers" Will Put in Port at Arkansas City.

Let People From All Parts of the Country Come and Enjoy Themselves,
July 4, by Taking a Ride on our Steamer.
Judge Bonsall received a letter Tuesday from T. S. Moorhead, at St. Louis. Mr. Moorhead is the gentleman who went to bring the steamer up the "Nile of America." By permission of the Judge, we reproduce this letter in our columns.

ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI, June 7, 1885.
DEAR BONSALL: We are here, and, as per Globe-Democrat of today, will leave foot of Morgan Street, near bridge, for Little Rock, Ft. Smith, and Arkansas City, Kansas, Tuesday, 9th. Our boat is called the "Kansas Millers," is a snug little craft, and will do the work no doubt by river. The distance is 1,595 miles; 500 miles by river to mouth of Arkansas. We can make that in five or six days, and the 1,000 miles on Arkansas will take about 20 days. We may do better or worse. We will get there on the 4th if possible or before.

Respectfully, T. S. MOORHEAD.
Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, June 20, 1885.

The Globe-Democrat describes a steamboat intended for Kansas waters.

"Wednesday morning a small towboat, intended for the upper waters of the Arkansas River, left this port for her destination, Arkansas City, Kansas. The distance she will have to travel before arriving there is over 1,400 miles. The boat was built at Carondelet, by Allen & Blaisdell, is 75 feet long, 15 feet beam, and 3 feet hold. The hull is built entirely of the best boiler steel, is provided with engines of the stern-wheel type, 8 inches diameter by 42 inches stroke, with boiler of fifty horse power. She draws only twelve inches of water and is destined to go under a bridge with only twelve feet clearance. Attempts have been made heretofore to navigate the shallow waters of the upper rivers and smaller streams, but this is the first boat built, with abundant capital at hand, to develop the navigation in a proper manner."

Arkansas City Republican, June 20, 1885.

Gilbert & Co., have purchased the boat belonging to parties at Salt City and removed it down to Rock ford on the Arkansas near the mouth of Chilocco. A boat run at this point will be of considerable convenience to cattlemen.

THE A. R. STEAMER.
Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

The Arkansas River Navigation Company expects to have its steamer at Arkansas City as an attraction on the Fourth. Speaking of this boat, on the 14th inst., the St. Louis Globe-Democrat said: "A small tow-boat, intended for the upper waters of the Arkansas River, left this port recently for her destination, Arkansas City, Kansas. The distance she will have to travel before arriving there is over 1,400 miles. The boat was built at Carondelet, by Allen & Blaisdell, is 75 feet long, 15 feet beam, and 3 feet hold. The hull is built entirely of the best boiler steel, is provided with engines of the stern wheel type, 8 inches diameter by 42 inches stroke, with boiler of fifty horsepower." She draws only twelve inches of water and is designed to go under a bridge with only twelve feet clearance. Attempts have been made heretofore to navigate the shallow waters of our upper rivers and smaller streams, but this is the first boat built, with abundant capital at hand, to develop the navigation in a proper manner."

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, July 4, 1885.

A Novel Craft.
Through the instrumentality of the Arkansas River Navigation Company, Arkansas City is gaining a widespread and enviable reputation. Nearly every exchange we pick up now-a-days contains a complimentary notice of the steamer "Kansas Millers" and Arkansas City. The latest we notice is in the Fort Smith Daily Tribune, which says:

"Under the above heading the Little Rock Democrat, of the 23rd inst., gives the following description of a little craft that was built to ply the waters of the Upper Arkansas."

"A novel craft landed at our wharf yesterday. It was a diminutive stern wheel steamboat named 'Kansas Millers.' A Democrat man boarded her and found that she was 75 feet long, 10 feet beam, and was built on a steel barge shaped hull. Her papers say she was built at St. Louis the present year, is 21 tons burden, has capacity for 20 passengers, is required to have a master and pilot, one engineer, two crew. She has one boiler, two engines--has cylinders 8 inches by 3-½ feet stroke. The captain is T. S. Moorhead, who is also principal owner; engineer, James Johnson. She carries two passengers, Dr. Hull, an excursionist, and 'Robinson Crusoe,' a traveling scenic artist. She left this morning for Arkansas City, Kansas, between which point and Ft. Smith she is expected to ply in the interest of the flour mills. As she does not draw no more than a wash tub, she will probably be able to do so."

Arkansas City Republican, July 4, 1885.

Capt. Barnes, an old navy captain, came in from Howard City Monday. Capt. Barnes was here to see the "Kansas Millers," and she had not come in. He went to meet her in a row-boat.

Arkansas City Republican, July 4, 1885.

Thursday noon the report was circulated on our streets that our steamer, the "Kansas Millers," had arrived and was anchored in the Walnut near the mills. The 4th of July printing committee rushed down into our office and ordered 10,000 bills to spread the glad tidings that the "Kansas Millers" had come. Hackman were busy making up loads of parties to go down and see our new steamer. A representative of the REPUBLICAN was busy grinding his shears so as he could report the news in the latest style. Excitement ran high. When everybody was about ready to start for the wharf, word reached us that the steamer had not arrived; that there was a row boat anchored near the mills; that Dick Hess had learned this fact and in thinking the matter over, the row boat was enlarged to a full grown steamer and as he gave voice to his vivid imagination, the report became thoroughly circulated. Consequently, the 4th of July committee has a job at the REPUBLICAN office waiting to be distributed.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

The ferry boat on the Arkansas river at Geuda Springs has been moved to the mouth of the Chilocco creek for the accommodation of freighters and others.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, July 11, 1885.

THE KANSAS MILLERS.
Anchors at Harmon's Ford Bridge, July 8, 1885, at 5 p.m.
Wednesday afternoon Allen Ayers spread the glad tidings to the effect that the steamer had arrived. For a time it was hardly credited, but soon wagon loads of people were seen going to Harmon's Ford. On arriving there we saw the long looked for steamer, the "Kansas Millers." Capt. Moorhead, Fred Barnett, and "Robinson Crusoe" were there. The steamer left St. Louis June 13 and made good time when running a safe voyage, and surpassing the most sanguine expectations of Capt. Moorhead. She would have been here July 4, according to promise, but the drift wood and high water at Tulsa would not permit the steamer to go under the bridge. The railroad company are building a higher bridge, which is nearly completed.

The boat is a novel one indeed, and has to be seen to be appreciated. On several other occasions the REPUBLICAN has given a description of the steamer and it is as we have stated heretofore. In traveling, the steamer averages about seven miles per hour on the Arkansas. It has been practically demonstrated that small boats could run on the river to this point. We will now have a southern outlet. Barges will be built and the steamer will soon be towing great cargoes of flour down to the "tooth-pick."

For a time the steamer will be used as an excursion boat until the steel barges are built. Fred Barrett will be in command and Capt. Barnes will be the pilot.

All the way up the river, the "Kansas Millers" made the best time of any craft. Sand bars were no hindrance. Capt. Moorhead tells us that any bar he ran onto, he either was able to go across or back off. It was impossible to stick the steel bottomed steamer. He was 20 days in traveling 1,791 miles, the distance by river from St. Louis to Arkansas City.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, July 11, 1885.

Thursday afternoon an excursion was advertised to occur down the river on the "Kansas Millers." The boat was to cast anchor at 1:30 p.m. and 5 p.m. Immediately after dinner about 150 persons went down to the landing, but they met with disappointment. The engineer took a sudden notion he wanted to return home and left on the afternoon train. No other engineer could be obtained so the excursionists wandered back to the city down-spirited but hopeful.

ARRIVED AT LAST.
Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The "Kansas Millers," the steamboat of the Arkansas River Navigation company, of which Messrs. Bliss & Wood are members, arrived at Arkansas City yesterday, having come fourteen hundred miles from St. Louis, in charge of Capt. T. S. Moorhead. It anchored in the Walnut, at Ayres' mill. At Tulsa, in the Territory, the high water and drift kept her from passing under a large railroad bridge and delayed her too long to reach Arkansas City for the Fourth. Her crew and passengers, besides the captain, were James Johnson, engineer; Dr. Hull, an excursionist, and "Robinson Crusoe," a traveling scenic artist. The boat cost $7,000 laid down at Arkansas City; is of twenty-one tons burden; capacity for twenty passengers; requires a master and pilot, one engineer, and a crew of two. She draws ten inches of water, is seventy-five feet long, with fifteen feet beam, and has a steel, barge-shaped hull. The Navigation company expect to ply her between Arkansas City and Fort Smith in shipping flour. She crossed shoals in but four inches of water in coming up.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Judge Torrance took in the Terminus Wednesday and Thursday, seeing steamboat and other novelties. A large party were to take a moonlight excurt down the river Wednesday on the steamer, but the engineer had skipped for St. Louis; and without a licensed engineer, the boat couldn't lift anchor.

DOWN THE "RAGIN ARKINSAW."
The Kansas Millers Practically Tested by the Arkansas River Navigation
Company and a Cargo of Interested Citizens, Grain, Etc.
Our Elongated Scribe Sandwiched In.
Cowley's New Steamer A Big Success.
Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Through the courtesy of Mr. Spencer Bliss, representing Bliss & Wood in the Arkansas River Navigation Company, our elongated reporter hauled himself from his couch at 3:30 yesterday morning, and in company with Mr. J. W. Millspaugh and Prof. Davis, sped away behind Mr. Bliss' bay chargers for the city of many "invalids" and much "medicine." The object was to join the Navigation Company, composed of James Hill, Bliss & Wood, Searing & Mead, and V. M. Ayres, and leading citizens of the Terminus, in an excursion down the "ragin' Arkinsaw" on the new steamer, Kansas Millers, as a practical test of its ability to master the sand bars and general "cussedness" of the American Nile. The hour of rising, though at first a severe shock to our delicate nerves, was such a charm that it will likely continue a life-time habit--if we have to sit up every night as on this occasion to do it. Dr. Evans and Mr. H. H. Hosmer were also among this bevy of early worms. It was a perfect morning; the tear drops of heaven had descended, making the air as soft and balmy as though wafted from the "fountain of eternal youth"--exhilarating beyond expression. A lovelier country can't be found under the blue canopy of heaven than that lying between here and Arkansas City. And just now it teems with promises of abundant crops of corn and other prospective cereals, while the shocks of golden wheat and oats continually dot the landscape. All along the road are the houses of many of Cowley's pioneers, and the evidences of their having laid up lucre where thieves can't cabbage it--in numerous tasty and substantial improvements exhibited all around. Reaching Arkansas City at 7 o'clock, a destructive raid was made on the ever unexcelled Leland Hotel. The balmy atmosphere inhaled on the road down was so bracing to the invalids of our party that all noses were upturned at the thought of a regulator of interior departments--known in Arkansas City parlance as "medicine" venders. A man is mighty fortunate to be able to stave off the "quick and sure" miasma grip of the canal, on entering the Terminus. Being full of Leland substantials, we delivered ourselves to the tender mercies of Archie Dunn and were soon landed on the banks of the placid Walnut, just east of the city, in the terrible presence of a Kansas steamer--a real, live steamboat, whose shrill voice sounded "all aboard.!" With a recklessness only attributable to enterprise, two more Archimedean levers were here put among the excursionists: Judge McIntire, the venerable and able editor of the Democrat, and Dick Howard, the young, energetic, and talented faberizer of the Republican. The excursion party, aside from those mentioned, contained sixty of Arkansas City's leading capitalists and businessmen, all the specially invited guests of Capt. Moorhead and the Navigation company. The trip was made for a thorough exhibition of the merits of the boat--to show thinking and enterprising men just what it could do. No ladies were along. They were reserved for a time when less business and seeming experimental danger were ahead. The boat is a surprise to all--exhibits clear through the deep faith and determination of its projectors. It is a steel hull structure, seventy-five feet long and fifteen wide. Its gross capacity is thirty-four tons, with twenty deck or steerage passengers. It has two high pressure engines with eight inch cylinders, one boiler thirteen feet long and three and a half in diameter, giving 60,000 pounds tensible strength. Its canvas-covered deck has one hundred chairs and its license limit to excursions not over forty miles down the river, is one hundred and thirty. She has pilot, berths, cookery, and all the requisites of a first-class tow steamer: life-boats, plank floats, cork life-preservers, etc., with stern wheel propeller. It drew but thirteen inches of water yesterday and when loaded to its fullest capacity, will draw only fourteen. It is managed by T. S. Moorhead, captain; Fred Barrett, mate; Samuel Clarke, formerly a machinist of Winfield, engineer; John Harrigan, fireman; H. P. Barnes, pilot; and Peter Yount, deck hand. James Hill, Spencer Bliss, C. Mead, and Allen Ayres represented the Navigation Company on this trip. At 8:05 the boat pulled out down the river for the land of the Noble Redskin. Prettier scenery can't be seen in this section than greets the eye upon either bank as you glide down. The velvety verdure was broken here and there by high bluffs, and, after you get down the Arkansas some distance, by low banks, giving a prairie view for miles around. The broad Arkansas, with the air impeded by but little timber, affords a more exhilarating breeze. The trip is delightful--charms one accustomed only to the dingy den of business. Going down, the steamer made over fifteen miles an hour. The river was swelled about thirty inches, but plenty of picturesque sand bars adorned it. As a practical test, the boat left the channel several times and glided over bars on which not more than eight inches of water flowed. The bottom could be heard grinding along on the sand. Being of steel bottom there is no friction and it seems impossible to stick the little steamer. About as bad places as the Arkansas contains were passed over with perfect ease. If the boat should happen to get stuck, however, only the fore could strand, and the aft will draw it back. The first cargo ever sent down the Nile of America was on board: five cwt. of flour and fifty bushels of corn, unloaded at Gilbert & Newman's cattle ranch, fifteen miles down. Thirty miles below Arkansas City, on the Kaw reservation, was found as pretty a grove as ever grew wild--a beautiful grassy incline, dotted with branching oaks, reminding one of some of the old Pennsylvania hillsides. Here the excursion landed and spent several hours, the principal of which was a grand feast which had been prepared by C. Burnett, of Arkansas City's St. Louis restaurant. It was soon demonstrated that, in "setting up" such "grub" for the crowd, Capt. Moorhead had a government contract that threatened bankruptcy. Nothing but four life-boats and sixteen cork life-preservers saved the COURIER's lean man. Unfortunately, there was no "medicine" on board, and Dick Howard, of the Republican, is probably now sleeping his last long sleep. Returning, a speed of about seven miles an hour was maintained, in a current much swifter than when status quo. About half way up, an anchorage was made in a shady nook, and toasts given to the "Kansas Millers." Mayor Schiffbauer was master of ceremonies and Nate Snyder did the shorthand act. The Mayor voiced the warm interest of Arkansas City's businessmen in this promising enterprise. James Hill, general manager of the K. C. & S. W. railroad and father of this steamboat scheme, showed up the great saving to Cowley County in freight rates, in the success of this barge line. The company propose to put $5,000 into a barge fleet. It will be composed of five steel barges, enclosed, and forty feet long and ten wide, each with ordinary capacity of twenty-five tons. They will ply them between Arkansas City and Fort Smith and Little Rock. Flour, meat, hay, etc., will be taken down and coal and lumber brought back. Flour, etc., can be taken down for $5 a ton, half what it now costs by rail, to the best market we can get. As good coal as can be found in Colorado and Pennsylvania can be bought at $2.50 per ton at Ft. Smith and lumber at prices to greatly benefit the consumer, laid down at Arkansas City. The daily expense of running this line will be twenty dollars. The boat cost $7,000 laid down at its destination, and with the barges, will show an investment of twelve thousand. Capt. Moorhead, under whose supervision the boat was constructed and brought up, said he had made a careful examination of the river all the way up and is satisfied, beyond a doubt, that it can be navigated with ease and profit to the company and people. The Captain takes great pride in this enterprise and shows an energy and knowledge of water most commendable. He says he can make the down trip to Ft. Smith, Arkansas, in four days, and return in six--three trips a month. He is convinced that in the near future two boats will be numerously plying the Arkansas to Arkansas City. The fifteen thousand dollars, appropriated and yet unused by Congress last winter for the improvement of the Arkansas river, will be applied for and promises to be forthcoming with other appropriations as soon as successful navigation is assured. Spencer Bliss, Judge Sumner, Judge McIntire, A. V. Alexander, and others made good speeches commendatory of the enterprise. The Navigation Company has divided its capital stock into 110 shares of $100 each. They were opened for subscriptions from those on the boat, and well on to $5,000, the amount necessary to construct the barges, was subscribed by H. D. Kellogg, J. H. Sparks, Ira Barnett, Herman Godehard, T. R. Houghton, Snyder & Hutchison, H. O. Meigs, Peter Pearson, Henry Endicott, Frick Bros., Wagner & Howard, S. F. George, C. H. Burroughs, A. V. Alexander, Mayor Schiffbauer, George Cunningham, Kimmel & Moore, Judge Sumner, and others. All were enthusiastic over the success, so far, of navigating the river.

On the boat is a queer character, a navigator and explorer who has been interested for years in the successful navigation of the Arkansas: L. F. Hadley, known along the river as "Old Robinson Crusoe." He is a Quapaw Indian by adoption, having been with different redskin tribes since he was eighteen, and is known among them as "In-go-nom-pa-she." Capt. Moorhead found him at Pine Bluffs, Arkansas; he wanted to come along and the Captain took him in. His early hobbies were scenic sketching and shorthand, and he is making a complete map of the river's channel. His stay among the Indians has been of a missionary character, and his stories of Indian life, as given to the reporter, would make an interesting volume. "Robinson Crusoe" has made the Arkansas a study for years and has always been certain that it could be navigated. He is a native of Michigan and first got in with the Indians of Northern Michigan. In 1881 he came up to Arkansas City in the steamer, "Aunt Sally," which many here will remember, under Capt. John McClary. It was an old wooden snag boat and of course a poor test. Then Crusoe mapped the river also. He is indeed an eccentric character, possessing an astonishing amount of self-acquired knowledge.

The barges will not be completed for forty days, during which time the "Kansas Millers" will make excursion trips down the river. Winfield people couldn't spend a day better than in going down for such a trip. Captain Moorhead and the Navigation company were assiduous in attentions to the guests on this trip. And the reporter found in Engineer Clarke a most pleasant and instructive escort through the intricacies of the lower deck. Mr. Clarke is an old Mississippi boatman, a thorough engineer, and the Company made a good strike when they secured him permanently.

We shall not soon forget our first trip down the "ragin' Arkinsaw" on a steamboat. The construction of this steamer is the inauguration of a great enterprise, and exhibits forcibly the characteristic "git up and git" of Cowley County men. Mr. James Hill, the father of the enterprise, and Capt. Moorhead, who planned and superintended so successfully the construction of the boat, are entitled to special credit. Mr. Hill would like to see three locks in the Walnut, letting the steamer come up to Winfield, which she could easily do with these adjuncts.

THAT STEAMER AGAIN.
Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

In mentioning the new steamer of the Arkansas River Navigation company, "Kansas Millers," the A. C. Republican says: "In traveling the steamer averages about seven miles per hour on the Arkansas. It has been practically demonstrated that small boats can run on the river to this point. We will now have a southern outlet. Barges will be built and the steamer will soon be towing great cargos of flour down to the "tooth-pick." For a time the steamer will be used as an excursion boat until the steel barges are built. Fred Barrett will be in command and Capt. Barnes will be the pilot. All the way up the river the "Kansas Millers" made the best time of any craft. Sand bars were no hindrance. Capt. Moorhead tells us that any sand bar he ran onto, he was able to go across or back off. It was impossible to stick the steel bottomed steamer. He was 20 days in traveling 1791 miles, the distance by river from St. Louis to Arkansas City."

LET US EXCURT.
Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

If the Arkansas River Navigation Company are good schemers and want to advertise themselves and Cowley County, they will get up an excursion down the Arkansas for the Cowley County editors and their wives and sweethearts. The cost would be small, the ride on the steamer, "Kansas Millers," very pleasant, and the newspaper men would all turn out, witness the practical test, and give the enterprise a big boom. Put in your oars, boys. The navigation company merely need the matter suggested to them. We are certain the invitation will be forthcoming. To properly write up such an enterprise, the reporter must be there, you know.

STEAMBOAT: "KANSAS MILLERS."
Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, July 18, 1885.

DOWN THE ARKANSAS.
The "Kansas Millers" Takes a Delegation of Businessmen Down the River Tuesday.
Monday an excursion on the "Kansas Millers" down the Arkansas by the businessmen was originated as the next day's programme. Bright and early two bus loads of our citizens wended their way to the Harmon's Ford landing and boarded the steamer. All together there were some 60 passengers. At 8:10 the steamer heaved anchor and in a very few moments we were out of sight of the many spectators who came down to see the excursionists start. We steamed down the river at a lively rate. In twenty minutes we were out of the mouth of the Walnut. On entering the Arkansas the speed of the vessel was increased and in a few minutes we were steaming along at the rate of 18 miles per hour. The passengers gave themselves up entirely to the enjoyment of the trip. All were inclined to be jolly and forget business cares one day at least. Cracking jokes, perpetrating harmless tricks, enjoying the beautiful trip down the Rackensack. The steamer had a canvas awning put up to keep out the scorching rays of the sun, and as the cool breezes came up the river, one and all felt it was good to be there.

At 9:15 we landed at the Grouse Creek ferry, about 20 miles downstream, to put off some freight which V. M. Ayres had shipped to Gilbert's and Newman's ranches. This was the first consignment of freight to the "Kansas Millers." It consisted of 50 bushels of corn and several hundred weight of flour. The passengers, full of life, took the place of deck hands and soon had the cargo landed.

Once more we heaved anchor and steamed down the river about five miles, and landed in a beautiful grove on the Kaw reservation. When the steamer had been made fast, all clambered ashore, and ran and jumped like school boys. While ashore C. A. Burnett took advantage of our absence and in a short time had spread a picnic lunch. All ate their fill. It was a splendid bill of fare, and Charley and his efficient cook deserve mention for their efforts to refresh the inner man. After partaking of the bounteous feast and the remnants being cleared away, we steamed up the river for home.

Capt. Moorhead ran the boat across several sand bars to show the passengers that it was impossible to stick the steel-bottomed steamer. After this had been fully demonstrated, the passengers were called to order by A. V. Alexander and a meeting was held for the purpose of organizing a stock company to build steel-bottomed barges. Mayor Schiffbauer was chosen to preside and N. T. Snyder was chosen to be secretary. Mayor Schiffbauer made a few remarks stating what great advantages Arkansas City would gain by having navigation opened on the Arkansas. He stated that Capt. T. S. Moorhead informed him that coal could be bought in quantities for $2, and laid down in Arkansas City so that it could be sold by dealers for $5 or $6 per ton. It was good coal, better than that which we had been paying $8 per ton for. Over 12 tons of the coal had been burned on the "Kansas Millers" and out of that not a clinker had been found. He spoke also of lumber trade with Arkansas. Jim Hill next occupied the attention of the passengers. He was followed by T. S. Moorhead, Dr. Kellogg, Judge McIntire, and several others who spoke in glowing terms of the steamer and the navigation of the river. After the question of building barges had been thoroughly discussed, the meeting proceeded to subscribe stock. Shares were taken until over $2,000 had been subscribed. The sum needed was $5,000. The meeting adjourned then until 7:30 p.m., when they met in Meigs & Nelson's real estate office to finish up the $5,000 stock company.

After the adjournment of the meeting, the crowd gave themselves up once more to enjoyment. At five o'clock we anchored at Harmon's Ford. Getting aboard Archie Dunn's busses, we were soon uptown. And thus ended a day of great recreation and profitable pleasure.

NOTES.
The sun was very warm coming upstream, compelling all passengers to seek shady nooks.

Alexander was the story-teller. He was not a success--cause audience went to sleep.

Spencer Bliss, Dr. Evans, and J. W. Millspaugh of Winfield were down and took in the excursion.

Frank Greer, of the Courier, and Prof. B. T. Davis, of the Tribune, were the representatives of the Winfield press and were busy all day with paper and pencil.

The REPUBLICAN office furnished the bill of fare cards.

NAVIGATION COMPANY.
Searing & Mead, Wood & Bliss, of Winfield, V. M. Ayres and the Arkansas City Roller Mill Company compose the navigation company. V. M. Ayres is president and C. H. Searing Secretary. These four milling firms, having practicably demonstrated that the Arkansas is navigable by steamers on the pattern of the "Kansas Millers," and having used $7,000 to further the enterprise already, naturally turn to the town most benefitted for assistance in the furthering of the enterprise. The directors are B. F. Wood, Maj. W. M. Sleeth, and James Hill.

Arkansas City Republican, July 18, 1885.

The REPUBLICAN has frequently wondered why a boating club had never been formed in Arkansas City for the utilization of the Walnut River south from the foot of Depot Street. The river affords splendid advantages for rowing.

Arkansas City Republican, July 18, 1885.

The Daily Courier suggests that an editorial excursion should be given by the Navigation Company.

Arkansas City Republican, July 18, 1885.

Mrs. Allie Bishop came down from Winfield Thursday night and took a pleasure trip on our new steamboat yesterday. She returned home today.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 22, 1885.

All ladies intending to take a ride on the steamboat can buy black silks for the next fifteen days, from ten to fifteen cents less than former prices, at the Rink Store.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 22, 1885.

Our Steamboat Enterprise.
The enterprise of the Kansas millers in building their steamboat to carry the product of their mills to a southern market, and return to this city with lumber, coal, and other merchandise, has been duly celebrated by the press of this region, and credit awarded the owners for their useful adventure. She was built in St. Louis and brought to this city by Capt. Moorhead, where she arrived two weeks ago. Since then the vessel has made a number of excursions down the river for the purpose of testing her steaming properties and to afford our citizens the novelty of a steamboat ride on their own rivers. These trial trips have been eminently satisfactory, the vessel making good time, and the engines working with ease and regularity. But the barges are yet to be procured, and the required amount of capital for their construction has not yet been raised. The intention is to have six of these vessels built, with a carrying capacity of 10 tons each, the aggregate cost of which will be $5,000. Two-thirds of this amount has been raised, and the balance will soon be subscribed.

Doubts are expressed by some cautious souls of this attempt to navigate the Upper Arkansas proving a success. They talk of low water and sand bars, and frozen streams, and all kinds of impediments. These difficulties will have to be faced, and the boat owners have made full allowance for their recurrence. During the driest period of the summer, the stagnant water will be so low that the vessel, light draft as she is, will have to lie up. In the winter ice at certain intervals will be apt to impede her passage, and then she must lose a few trips. But making ample allowance for all these drawbacks, there will be navigation for the "Kansas Millers" and other boats of her class, during six or seven months in the year, and this will content their owners. The Upper Ohio during the hot months becomes just as shallow as the Arkansas; and it is a stale joke in that country that the county commissioners are about to fence in the rivers to keep the cows from drinking them dry.

We believe it is an accepted fact that the seasons are changing along our main water courses owing to the diffusion of population. The theory seems now established that the cultivation of the soil promotes evaporation and thus increases the rainfall. This will give us a shorter dry season in the coming years, and most probably render the five or six months of suspended navigation in excess of the realized fact.

Aid may also be expected from congress in clearing the river bed of impediments. Indeed, there is now an unexpended balance of $15,000, as we are informed, appropriated for improving the Arkansas River, which may be rendered available, in whole or in part, for use within the limits of this state, now we have a steamboat navigating the stream, to render its expenditure justifiable.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

A number of our people, ladies and gentlemen, young and old, are very desirous of an excursion down the "Ragin' Arkansaw" on the "Kansas Millers." County Commissioner Walton has consulted with Captain T. S. Moorhead and has the promise of the boat for Thursday. Mr. Walton is also trying to arrange an excursion train down in the morning, but Mr. Ingersoll, of the Santa Fe depot, at the Terminus, is uncertain whether this can be done. A train to return at night is assured and the crowd can go down at noon. One hundred can be comfortably seated on the boat and one hundred and thirty is the limit. It would be a delightful, charming trip. The boat fare, just enough to pay expenses, will be 50 cents per capita, and the whole trip will not cost over $1.50 apiece. Mr. Walton will complete arrangements in time to duly advertise it in THE DAILY.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Capt. H. P. Barnes and Samuel Clarke, pilot and engineer of the "Kansas Millers," came up from Arkansas City Monday. Capt. Barnes came up to see his old friend. Capt. John Lowry, with whom he steam-boated years ago on the Illinois river. Great stories are always insured when two old steamboat captains meet for the first time in fourteen years or more.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, July 25, 1885.

The "Kansas Millers" awakens the echoes near Arkansas City. It is the first steamboat that has ploughed the mad waves and sand bars of the Arkansas as high as Arkansas City. The trip up the river has demonstrated the fact that the Arkansas is navigable for such steamers as the "Kansas Millers." This will open a direct connection south and will greatly benefit Cowley County. Burden Eagle.

Arkansas City Republican, July 25, 1885.

The Courier started a boom for a Cowley County editorial excursion down the "Ragin' Rackensack." The REPUBLICAN would like to make an amendment. Why not take in Sedgwick, Butler, Sumner, and Cowley? Have a boat load, you know.

Arkansas City Republican, July 25, 1885.

ABOUT THE BARGES.
Commerce is What it Takes to Secure an Appropriation From
The Government for the Improvement of the Upper Arkansas.
A meeting was held in rooms in the Hasie Block Tuesday evening by those interested in the navigation of the Arkansas River; about $1,000 more stock was subscribed to build Barges. It was determined to build the wooden barges immediately and have them carrying freight in 10 or 15 days. Work will commence as soon as the lumber arrives. The steel barges will be ready for use in about 60 days or as soon as they can be built. Capt. Moorhead had written to a boiler firm at Kansas City to send a man here to make estimates. He came Thursday. The reading of a letter received by Capt. Moorhead from a civil engineer in the employ of the government created new zeal for the enterprise. The following is an extract.

Mr. T. S. Moorhead, C. E.:

SIR: Referring to your letter of July 11th, I have to inform you that it is as yet an open question whether improvements should be extended above Fort Gibson, or not. A survey of the river has been made from Wichita, Kansas, to Fort Gibson, Indian Territory, during the past year. The notes are partially worked up in my office and when completed, a study will be made of the river and report made. Until this is done, it is not deemed advisable to expend any money above Fort Gibson, I. T. Your boat and plans materially alter the condition of things and it is your privilege to forward to this office such facts in regard to your plans for the commerce of the river as you may think advisable. You could not have arrived at a more opportune time, for in a few weeks I should have been obliged to state that there was little if any commerce, and of course that would have settled the question of improvement.

Your arrival opens up the subject anew. I know all about the river that is necessary, so you will do well to collect all the data as to how much freight and how many passengers you expect to carry. Please give facts and figures rather than theories. It seems to me that Kansas needs this southern outlet, and if the commerce is only sufficient, there is nothing to prevent my recommending improvements as high as Arkansas City, at least. You should collect statistics and have them signed by the leading businessmen of the place or surrounding section, forward the same to me by September 1st at least. I trust you will correspond freely with this office as it is my wish to render you all the assistance I legitimately can. I will try to visit Arkansas City in the Autumn in order to get better ideas of the needs of the section. The great determiner is commerce, present and prospective, however, and your best policy is to collect data along this line.

LATER. Just as we go to press, Maj. Searing comes in and announces that the contract has been closed for three steel barges with the Kansas City firm. One barge is to be 16 x 60 feet; and the other two, 12 x 60 feet. They will be done and in use by Sept. 1, 1885. The wooden barges will not be built.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 29, 1885.

On Monday evening the Kansas Millers made a moonlight excursion down the river, affording her passengers a delightful three hours' ride. Yesterday afternoon four coach loads of excursionists, accompanied with a band, arrived from Winfield, and enjoyed the novelty of a steamboat ride.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 29, 1885.

Excursion from Wichita.
We received a pleasant call on Saturday from Frederic W. Sweet and Sam F. Woolard, both of Wichita. These are energetic young businessmen, who for the purpose of making the people of the two cities better acquainted, have arranged for an excursion party of businessmen and their lady friends to spend a day here. Three hundred persons will compose the party, and a special train will carry them hither and home again. The hour of starting is set at 8 o'clock, and Arkansas City will be reached at 10. They have also chartered the steamboat for the day, and propose running short trips down the river. The fame of the saucy craft, the Kansas Millers, has been heralded through the state, and the curiosity of our neighbor towns has been piqued to see this much described boat. The excursionists will leave here at 8 p.m., arriving home two hours later. We bespeak for them a pleasant and profitable day's outing.

Arkansas City Traveler, July 29, 1885.

Proposed River Trade.
We regret to learn that Capt. Moorhead's failing health has compelled him to resign his command of the Kansas Millers, and return to his former home in Milton, Pennsylvania, with a view to rest and recuperation. His engagement as surveyor on the Kansas City and Southwestern road brought him into intimate relations with our own citizens, and his estimable qualities and usefulness in enterprises of this nature led to his being placed in charge of the construction of our new steamboat. Those best acquainted with Capt. Moorhead part with him with regret, and trust that he will soon return with restored health. Capt. Alton, late of Ohio, has been engaged to take charge of the boat.

We understand it is the intention of the owners to employ the Kansas Millers till the 6th of August in carrying freight to the various agencies. On the date given she will be used by the Wichita excursionists. Then she will take a trip to Fort Gibson, carrying merchandise. Money has been raised to build the barges to form the vessel's towage, and an order given to a Kansas City house to do the work. Thus early in September this pioneer in the enterprise of water carriage to the lower Arkansas, will be ready to tow the product of our mills to an eastern market, and bring back coal, lumber, and other bulky freight on her return voyage.

THE STEAMBOAT EXCURSION.
Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

Our folks, nearly one hundred and fifty of them, got home from the steamboat excursion down the "Ragin' Rackinsack" at 6:30 Wednesday, on the regular north bound freight. The trip was not as tranquil as expected--though the additional romance added spice to the trip and gave a very extensive view of the Nile of America. Then some fellows who hadn't tampered with labor in many suns were made to work like beavers. The boat was too heavily ladened--a third more people on than should have been, every available space being filled. With 150 on board it was no wonder that the pilot and captain got "all broke up." The boat stuck twice on sand bars and had to be roped off, staying four or five hours at each "stick," the whole cargo helping to extricate it. The whole night, with its balmy breezes and silvery moon, was spent on the river, and the excursionists raked their craniums for amusements, succeeding finely. THE COURIER's fat man hasn't turned up yet--possibly buried in the sand of the "Arkinsaw," but we look for him this evening, when he will give his history of the trip. The stranding of the boat can be easily explained, and augurs nothing against the success of navigating America's Nile. The Juvenile Band was a splendid attraction. Its fine music was a source of most acceptable relief and enjoyment.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

Chas. M. Leavitt, Our F. M., represented THE COURIER in the "Kansas Millers" excursion Tuesday. Some accuse us of a premeditated scheme to sink the boat. If it stands this test, we shall warmly advocate a still greater test--embracing Judge Bard, E. C. Seward, et al, with the whole "Fat Man's Paradise."

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, August 1, 1885.

The Moonlight Excursion.
The first moonlight excursion upon the Walnut and Arkansas occurred Monday night under the management of Allen Ayers. There were some sixty or seventy aboard. The boat was especially lighted up with Chinese lanterns of many different colors. It started a little before 8 o'clock and got back by 10, having gone down the rivers about ten miles. The extreme beauty of the evening made it a very enjoyable affair. The sky was clear. The rising moon flooded the waters with a broad streak of golden light, and made the scenery look very beautiful and picturesque. The Arkansas City String Band furnished some of that excellent music for which it is fast becoming famous. One was inclined to think of the words of Shakespeare.

"How sweet the moonlight sleeps upon this bank,

Here will we sit and let the sounds of music

Creep in our ears. Soft stillness and the night

Become the touches of sweet harmony."

There was a melodeon on board and the ladies occasionally entertained the company with a song. Frank Hess, also, paralyzed his listeners by his wonderful performance upon that instrument.

In order to keep cool a great many crowded near the water wheel, which served as a gigantic fan, and now and then they regaled themselves with the delicious ice cream that was furnished in abundance by Hamilton & Pentecost.

Our space will not permit us to relate all the points of interest during that pleasant trip. When the steamer started, it was not covered by canvas, and the people soon become conscious of something falling upon them like fine rain. Imagine the astonishment of the ladies, who wore white dresses, when they found that their clothing was nearly black by being covered with soot from the smoke stack. Guy Sparks, in his eagerness to study Natural History and obtain a specimen for his museum, quite terrified the ladies by dropping a large locust in their midst. When the boat neared the landing place, a painter who was more anxious than the rest to be the first one to touch his "native land," made a jump for the shore and fell in. He probably thought that the night was too damp to be comfortable. The guitar players performed with such might and hearty good will that at one time three out of four instruments were minus E strings. But that difficulty was soon overcome. There was much merry-making, and it is to be hoped that there will be more such excursions after night, and that everything will pass off as pleasantly as this, the first moonlight excursion down the Walnut and Arkansas.

Arkansas City Republican, August 1, 1885.

The "Kansas Millers" took a load of freight down to Pawnee Agency yesterday, stopping at intermediate points. Searing & Mead sent flour; V. M. Ayres, flour and corn; and the Roller Mill Co., flour. Maj. C. H. Searing and wife, Mrs. H. Clevinger and little boy went as passengers. The boat will return in time to take care of the Wichita excursion.

Arkansas City Republican, August 1, 1885.

About 150 excursionists composed of the elite of Winfield came down Tuesday to enjoy a pleasure ride on the "Kansas Millers." The steamer heaved anchor at 2 p.m. Everything went lovely until the boat started to return, when the pilot ran it on a sand bar. This happened twice. The boat did not get back to pier No. 1 until 4:30 a.m. All say that it was through the ignorance of the pilot that the boat became stranded. The fat man of the Courier was aboard and he was too heavy a burden. We acknowledge a call from Mr. Leavitt. He is a pleasant gentleman and we hope he will come again. A pleasant time was had by the excursionists with the exception of sleeping on the bar all night.

Arkansas City Republican, August 1, 1885.

The excursion to Arkansas City will be a success. Sam Woolard and Fred Sweet have returned from Arkansas City, where they have made all the arrangements for a first-class time. They have secured the use of a beautiful grove, near the railroad, and have chartered the steamboat for the day. The arrangements for this excursion are more complete than any that ever left the city. Anybody that fails to take it in will regret it. Wichita Eagle.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 5, 1885.

That Moonlight Excursion.
The Winfield excursionists had a rough experience on the river last week, when they stepped aboard the Kansas Millers to enjoy the romance of a moonlight ride. There were too many in the party, some of the excursionists had large avoirdupois, and the boat resented the invasion by getting hard aground. The Courier "fat man" was on board, and the lean editor left in the office; and he irreverently poked fun at his distressed brother.

[EXCURSION DAY.]

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, August 8, 1885.

Thursday was excursion day. At about 10 o'clock a.m., the train arrived from Wichita with four passenger coaches and a mail car, loaded to their utmost capacity with some 400 excursionists. A large crowd of our citizens were down at the depot to meet the visitors, but the train pulled on down to the road leading to Harmon's Bridge.

A large body of the people went to the beautiful grove adjoining the steamboat landing, while a still greater portion came up to the city to enjoy a first-class meal at our hotels. After dinner a goodly number went down to the river to enjoy a ride on the steamer, which made frequent trips up and down the Walnut. The Wichita Cornet band was in attendance and enlivened the occasion with some choice music.

The base ball club was on hand and refused to play against our boys unless a purse of $50 was put up. Our boys did not want to do this because their pitcher was sick in bed; but a number of the lovers of the game, in order that the match might be played, went down in their pockets and fished out the necessary sum. At 3 p.m., the game commenced with the Wichitas at the bat. They were all great big shouldered strikers and it was evident they would have a "walk over" after the first inning was played. On the seventh inning the Border Club threw up the sponge, the score standing 36 to 5 in favor of the visiting club. The Border Club expected to play the same crew as it had on its visit to Wichita. There were just two of the old nine present. The rest were taken from St. Louis, Olathe, and Kansas City. Arkansas City's ball club can play against Sedgwick County, but when it comes to ringing in the world, we crawfish. But five of the original Border club played, word having been sent to some of the boys the game would not come off. The game had a bad effect on everybody, except the visitors, and we feel very sorry that our boys should have been beaten so badly. The excursionists returned home at 7 p.m., joyous and happy and well pleased with the entertainment furnished them by the inhabitants of the city on the sandhill.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 19, 1885.

The steamboat Kansas Millers is reported stranded on a bar near Ponca Agency, with a load of flour aboard.

Arkansas City Traveler, August 19, 1885.

COUNCIL MEETING.
A letter from one Thompson, of Ohio, offering to sell a small steamboat of 20 inches draft, to ply on the Arkansas River, was read and tabled.

Arkansas City Republican, August 22, 1885.

AN APPROPRIATION.
To be Obtained from Congress as soon as that Body Meets.
For the Improvement of the Arkansas River from Fort Gibson to Arkansas City.
It will be remembered by our readers that the REPUBLICAN published a letter in regard to the improvement of the upper Arkansas a short time ago. The letter had been received by Mr. Moorhead and was from Mr. Taber. The following is another letter received in regard to the matter.

U. S. ENGINEERS OFFICE,
LITTLE ROCK, ARKANSAS.
August 10, 1885.
Mr. I. H. Bonsall, U. S. C. C. Commissioner, Arkansas City, Kansas.

SIR: I am very glad to get your letter of the 5th. There is one matter that is specially acceptable, and that is your direct manner of presenting facts. Your letter will be of great service in connection with preparing estimates. There is one point that you will be pained to learn, but yet should know and that is there is now no money on hand especially appropriated for the reach from Fort Smith to Wichita, Kansas. The last of it was expended in accord with my predecessor's plans in January last. There being no actual navigation above Fort Gibson, it could not be expended above there until the river was improved below. When I came into this district, there was only a small balance left, and I simply carried out my predecessor's plans. It is a great pity that the "Kansas Millers" did not arrive about a year earlier. As it is now, it will simply require patience until congress meets. You are practically opening an entirely new question. Neither myself or my predecessors have dared lay very much stress on this stream of river, for there was no actual navigation; now all this is changed, and when I send my report of the survey on to Washington, I shall send with it matured plans for the improvement of this reach as far as Arkansas City at least. There should be no reason why an appropriation should not be made, as you can offer some of the grandest statistics I have ever received. The river has been made first class except a few shoals as high as Gibson from Fort Smith with the money to which you refer. There is now $6,590.61 available for the entire reach from Wichita, Kansas, to its mouth. This has been reserved for the snag-boat service on the lower river, which reservation has been approved by the Chief of Engineers. You will see that I may be able to use a little of this to give you temporary relief. None of this appropriation has been used anywhere else since the "Kansas Millers" passed Little Rock, or rather since I saw a notice in the St. Louis Globe-Democrat that such a boat was building. If you had only sent me word say last February of what was expected, I could have held some money. As it is, however, I was in duty bound to expend it where navigation urgently needed it. I am intensely interested in the new departure and you may depend upon my making good use of every argument you can give me. I have already sent a recommendation to the Secretary of War that the bridge at Tulsa be changed, this being based on Mr. Moorhead's letter to said Secretary. Until Congress meets, little can be done. Everything favors an appropriation for I am able to say the river can be improved. The people demand an improvement and the commerce warrants it. I will try and spare a thousand dollars to fix the worst places. There is also a way by which arrangements can be made with the Secretary of War by which the citizens of Arkansas City can deposit to my credit at Little Rock, say $2,000, as a contingent fund. I have to reserve about this amount to care for property in case there should be no new appropriation. If the citizens are practically sure there will be, they can make this deposit and I will use up my own contingent. Then when the new appropriation comes along, and I have not drawn on the contingent, it reverts to the citizens. If I have been obliged to so draw, all that is drawn of course is used and only the balance will be returned. I am not allowed to spend any money in advance of an appropriation. This I believe gives you the whole scope of the question. I will visit you before writing my report. This is a large district and I have Fort Smith, Dardanelle, Batesville, St. Francis, and Pine Bluff to visit yet, where important matters wait my attention, before turning to you. A free interchange of thoughts, opinions, and views is earnestly requested. Respectfully Yours, H. S. TABER, Captain of Engineers.

Arkansas City, Kansas, August 17, 1885.
EDITOR REPUBLICAN: In connection with the above letter, I would suggest that a public meeting be called so that all persons interested in this matter (and every citizen of Cowley County is interested) can attend and take part, and that the ways and means of accomplishing this most desirable object be thoroughly discussed. Now is the time to give Cowley County such a shove ahead that all doubts as to her future will be a thing of the past. Make this river navigable and the future of Cowley County is assured.

The great need of Southern Kansas is transportation. Give us cheap freight rates and we can then successfully compete with the grain producers in Illinois and other points north and east of us. It will give us competition over nature's highway, where there can be no pooling, as it is free to all. Depending upon railroads where combinations are formed and earnings pooled is folly when river navigation can be obtained. Keep this boat on the river until congress meets and prove that the river can be made useful, and then make an effort to have an appropriation for the permanent improvement of the river and this will accomplish the object in view. Let a public meeting be called at once, inviting all the farmers and businessmen of Cowley to attend and give the matter a fair discussion, and then let us all put our shoulders to the wheel and push this through. It can be done; all that is needed is united action. Most Respectfully, I. H. BONSALL.

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, September 9, 1885.

OUR CITY AND ITS PROSPECTS.
The enterprise of Kansans is proverbial, and the farmers and businessmen of Cowley County form no exception to the rule. To carry this flour to market, and bring back a supply of lumber and coal, river navigation has been determined, and a light draft, flat-bottomed steamboat, drawing but 12 inches of water, has been built, which is now on her way to Fort Smith with a cargo of flour, which is regarded as the initial point to an extensive and prosperous river navigation.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 14, 1885.

Barge Builders At Work.
On Monday Mr. E. Palmer, senior proprietor of the Mid-Continent Boiler Works, of Kansas City, arrived in town with six workmen, to construct a steel barge for towage by the Steamer, "Kansas Millers." The materials, it seems, have been standing unloaded at the depot for several weeks, but the steamboat company, having a depleted treasury, have taken no steps to have the barge put together, waiting the return home of Mr. James Hill. The workmen are now employed erecting a stage on the other side of the Walnut River, at Harmon's ford, for the construction of the barge. During the detention of the materials here we learn from Mr. Palmer several kegs of nails and washers have been abstracted from the car, and more material will have to be sent before the work can be completed. The vessel when put together will be 60 feet long, with a breadth of 12 feet, and her capacity is estimated at 20 tons. With a full cargo her draft of water will not be over 2½ or 3 inches. The steel plates are 12 feet long by 3 feet wide; those which compose the hull are ¼ inch thick, while the bow will be made of plates three-sixteenths thick. Four lengths will compose the stowage portion of the barge, the ends fastened with strip iron secured to the steel by four rows of rivets placed 1½ inches apart. Bars and braces and angle iron will be freely used to give the vessel the necessary staunchness. An inside deck or flooring with plank will be laid over the bottom of the barge, and at the gunwale, or upper portion of the sides, an upper deck will be laid. The sides, we should have mentioned, will be three feet high. The addition of the bows and stern will extend the vessel 12 feet, and give it shapeliness as a river craft. It will be built in six water tight compartments. Three of these vessels were ordered, but the order has since been modified to two, and the materials for the other barge will arrive here in a few days. The cost of the two will be about $2,600. Mr. Palmer and his crew of workmen are staying at the Central Hotel.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, October 17, 1885.

MORE BOOM
FOR THE METROPOLIS OF COWLEY COUNTY.
The Work of Building Barges to Carry Freight Commenced.
THE NAVIGATION OF THE ARKANSAS A LUSCIOUS PLUM FOR ARKANSAS

CITY AND THE NAVIGATION COMPANY HAVE PLUCKED IT.

Last week the material for one barge arrived. Monday last E. Palmer, representing the Mid-Continent Boiler Works of Kansas City, arrived with six workmen to set the barge up, and have been employed all this week at it. The barge when put together will be 60 feet long by 16 feet wide with a capacity for carrying 20 tons. It will draw about 3 inches of water when loaded. The Navigation Company have ordered the material for another barge, and they are now determined to have navigation opened up on the Arkansas before fall is over. The steamer, Kansas Millers, will tow the barges downstream. The trouble heretofore experienced will now be avoided. No cargo will be put on the steamer. It will be used to tow the barges, and as it only draws 10 inches of water, no difficulty will be found in navigating the Arkansas. Jas. Hill came home from New York this week and set everything to going. He says the scheme must work and we have no doubt but what it will.

Arkansas City Republican, October 17, 1885.

Soon we will have two steamboats plying up and down the Arkansas.

Arkansas City Traveler, October 28, 1885.

The workmen have finished one of the barges that will form the towage of the Steamboat, Kansas Millers, and are now putting the second barge together. The vessel is sixty feet long, and is not an unshapely specimen of river architecture. It is built in six water tight compartments, and although the steel which forms the hull of the barge is ¼ of an inch thick, it is so well stayed with bars and angle iron that it is really a staunch vessel. Its burden is 20 tons and when loaded will displace 2½ inches of water.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, October 31, 1885.

ALMOST ONE MILLION
Dollars Worth of Improvements Made to Arkansas City This Building Season.
The following is a partial list of the improvements made in Arkansas City since March 1, 1885.

Navigation Company.
Steamboat $7,000

Barges $3,000

Arkansas City Republican, October 31, 1885.

One of the steel barges to be used by the Navigation company is almost completed.

Arkansas City Traveler, November 11, 1885.

Arkansas City Visited.
Bro. Merydith, of the Dexter Eye, visited Arkansas City lately, and here is his account of what he saw and reflections pertinent thereto.

"Last Saturday in company with Mr. R. Hite, we made a visit to Arkansas City. We found the streets crowded with teams and everything lively. The stores and shops were crowded with men, women, and Indians. They have some of the finest stores, hotels, etc., in southern Kansas. We met several of the prominent men of the town and we learned one of the secrets of their success. They have a committee of twenty-five of their leading citizens who subscribe a certain amount to raise a fund to be used in carrying out any project or scheme to advance the interest of their town and surrounding country. On Sunday we were furnished a good rig by Messrs. Bryson & Moore, and in company with R. Hite and C. W. Barnes, we went to see the sights along the river and canal. The first thing visited was the steamboat, 'Kansas Millers.' We found it manned by Robinson Crusoe, a translator of the Indian language. The boat is 16 feet wide and 75 feet long and draws about two feet of water. They have just finished a new steel barge and will be ready for business shortly. We believe from what we saw and learned that they will make the enterprise a grand success. We next went to look at the canal. They were drawing the water off in order to wash out the channel and instead of the banks caving in or its washing out too much, as some said, we found that the sand from the river caused it to be a kind of self-feeder and is regulated on Sunday by raising the water gates and running the surplus sand off. There are three large flouring mills and water enough for a dozen more. One cooper shop where they put up their own barrels. There is 22 feet of a fall and water enough to run all the factories in the state. Arkansas City is building up rapidly. There are nine large business houses in course of construction, and altogether there is not a town in Kansas that has a more glorious future before her."

[EXCHANGES.]

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, November 14, 1885.

ARKANSAS CITY
As Seen by the Editor of The Dexter Eye.
Last Saturday, in company with Mr. R. Hite, we made a visit to Arkansas City. We found the streets crowded with teams and everything lively. The stores and shops were crowded with men, women, and Indians. They have some of the finest stores, hotels, etc., in southern Kansas. We met several of the prominent men of the town and we learned one of the secrets of her success. They have a committee of twenty-five of their leading citizens who subscribe a certain amount to raise a fund to be used in carrying out any project or scheme to advance the interest of their town and surrounding country. On Sunday we were furnished a rig by Messrs. Bryson & Moore, and in company with R. Hite and C. W. Barnes, we went to see the sights along the river and canal. The first thing visited was the steamboat, "Kansas Millers." We found it manned by Robinson Crusoe, a translator of the Indian language. The boat is 16 feet wide and 75 feet long and draws about two feet of water. They have just finished a new steel barge and will be ready for business shortly. We believe from what we saw and learned that they will make the enterprise a grand success. We next went to look at the canal. They were draining the water off in order to wash out the channel and instead of the banks caving in or it washing out too much, as some said, we found that the sand from the river caused it to be a kind of self-feeder, and is regulated on Sunday by raising the water gates and running the surplus sand off. There are three large flourishing mills and water for a dozen more. One cooper shop, where they put up their own barrels.

There is 22 feet of a fall and water enough to run all the factories in the state. Arkansas City is building up rapidly. There are nine large business houses in course of construction and altogether there is not a town in Kansas that has a more glorious future before her.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, November 28, 1885.

BOARD OF TRADE, OF ARKANSAS CITY.
COMMITTEE ON RAILROADS AND STEAMBOATS.
ARTICLE 6. There shall also be appointed by the managers, at the regular semi-annual meetings, a standing committee on railroads and steamboats, to consist of five members, to whom shall be referred all matters relating to the transportation of merchandise and passengers to and from the city. They shall semi-annually and whenever they deem it expedient make reports to the managers or board all such subjects relating to the various railroad and steamboat lines connected with our city, with such recommendations for the action of the managers or board as they may deem advisable.

 

1886
Arkansas City Traveler, February 24, 1886.

We mentioned in our last issue that Bradford Beal left town with J. H. Sherburne, intending to pay a visit to the Maine Cattle Co.'s ranch. On reaching Ponca he found the ice on the Salt Fork broken up, and the ferry boat lying high on the opposite bank. On that side of the river there were Charles Howard, on his way home from the same ranch, and several others just as anxious to pass over. There were several tons of ice frozen solid within the boat, and with the deficient appliances at hand, launching the vessel was no easy matter. But they worked like good fellows all Saturday afternoon and the whole of Sunday, until their exertions were rewarded by getting the ferry afloat. This enabled them to open communication, and those that were detained on both shores went on their way rejoicing. In justification of their working on Sunday, these pious citizens will probably urge that their ox was in the pit.

Arkansas City Republican, March 27, 1886.

Navigation of the Arkansas River now seems to be an assured fact, but one thing certainly can be relied on, even if Congress does not appropriate the $120,000 asked for, and that is, that A. V. Alexander & Co., a home institution, cannot be undersold in lumber, lath, shingles, sash doors, cement, plaster, etc.

Arkansas City Republican, April 10, 1886.

The much talked of steel barges for the navigation of the Arkansas River have at last been completed. There are two of them, each 10 x 60 feet. They are capable of hauling three car loads of flour, drawing only about 10 inches of water. Next week the "Kansas Millers" will tow them down to Ft. Smith with a cargo of flour and other freight. With the Ft. Smith Road and a line of steamboats plying up and down the Arkansaw to this city, won't our boom be immense!

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, May 29, 1886. From Thursday's Daily.

Boating parties on the silvery bosom of the Walnut are now the order of the day, or the evenings, rather. A more pleasant course for boating would be hard to find, and our young ladies are promising themselves many a moonlight ride, forgetful of the consequences to the tender hands of their Romeos.

[ARKANSAS RIVER: NAVIGATION.]

Arkansas City Republican, June 12, 1886.

THE NAVIGATION
OF THE ARKANSAS RIVER TO BE AN ACCOMPLISHED FACT.
The Craft, the Kansas Millers, Well on Her Way Down to
Ft. Smith, With More than Six Car-Loads of Flour.
Lumber to be Brought Up On the Return Trip.
As our readers are well aware, for several years the navigation of the Arkansas River has been agitated. A few months ago matters began to arrange themselves into definite shape. The millers of Cowley County had foreseen that they must have a southern market opened up to them at a cheaper freight rate than they were obtaining from the railroad companies or else their milling interests would suffer materially. Accordingly they formed themselves into an association and had the steamer, "Kansas Millers," constructed to ply upon the upper Arkansas from this city down to the larger cities in the state of Arkansas. Captain T. S. Moorehead brought the "Kansas Millers" to its landing in the Walnut in July of last summer. This clearly demonstrated that the Arkansas River could be navigated as far up as this city. The plucky Millers in their venture had met with more than the most sanguine dared to hope for: SUCCESS.

Later on the steel barges have been constructed for the carrying of the cargo, and yesterday morning the first consignment of freight was made. The steamer with its barges glided gracefully down the Walnut into the Arkansas with Capt. Barnes in command without a mishap and disappeared from view in the distance.

This navigation of the Arkansas River means much for the future welfare of Arkansas City.

Heretofore the transportation rates on a carload of flour, by railroad, to Ft. Smith has been almost $100. It is now being sent down to the same destination for less than $50 per carload. On the six car-loads sent down Wednesday, some $300 in freight rates has been saved to the shipping millers of Cowley County. This is an item that is worth looking after and will have a tendency to make the efforts of both seller and buyer double what they have been heretofore in the navigation of the river. On the return trip Capt. Barnes will load up his barges with lumber. On a carload of lumber from Arkansas, the freight rate is about $8 per thousand. The "Kansas Millers" will bring the same to Arkansas City for half of that sum. Thus it will be seen what the navigation of the Arkansas River means for us.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, June 12, 1886. From Friday's Daily.

Captain Thompson, a steamboat captain on the Ohio River, is in the city. He came here to investigate the navigating of the Arkansas. He arrived 24 hours too late to take the "Kansas Millers" for Fort Smith. Capt. Thompson says the Arkansas is navigable upon the plan proposed by our millers. He will remain in our city several days.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, June 12, 1886. From Friday's Daily.

Capt. M. Thompson, of London, Ohio, is in the city looking after the purchasing of an interest in the "Kansas Millers" navigation steamboat line upon the Arkansas River.

Capt. Thompson came up the river several years ago on the "Rob-Roy." He thinks the navigation of the river is possible and would be a paying investment.

He tells us he would gladly lay all the flour the millers of Cowley County could manufacture down at Ft. Smith at half freight rates charged by the railroads.

Should Capt. Thompson make the necessary arrangements to take charge of the "Kansas Millers," he will bring a small steamer he has at present upon the White River above Evansville in Indiana and use it in going up the Walnut and Arkansas Rivers from this city to gather up the cargo. The REPUBLICAN hopes the Captain will succeed in making the purchase.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, June 19, 1886. From Monday's Daily.

Capt. M. Thompson, who has been in the city several days, will leave for St. Louis in the morning. Capt. Thompson came here from London, Ohio, to purchase an interest in the "Kansas Millers," but as it had gone down the river with a cargo of flour, the trade was not made.

The Captain desires to undertake the task of navigating the Arkansas from this city down and should he make the necessary arrangements to do so, he will bring his steamer here from the White River in Indiana. It is 12 x 56 feet and only draws 10 inches of water when in operation. The Captain informs us he will bind himself to navigate the Arkansas for two years, making a trip at least once a month to Fort Smith, sometimes, twice, if our two steel barges are furnished him. Flour will be laid down at Ft. Smith for 25 cents per hundred, just half the rate charged by the railroad companies.

Today Capt. Thompson met with the Navigation Company to come to an understanding in regard to the matter. Should the agreement be favorable, Capt. Thompson will remove his family here and make Arkansas City his home.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, June 19, 1886. From Tuesday's Daily.

Capt. M. Thompson met with the navigation company Monday. It is very probable that the captain will purchase a half-interest in the "Kansas Millers," and bring his small steamer here from the White River. It will run between here and Ponca Agency, while the "Kansas Millers" runs from Ponca to Ft. Smith. The matter will be definitely settled in a day or so.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, June 26, 1886. From Friday's Daily.

Winfield has a steamer. It is called "The Belle of Winfield." Large name that; larger than the boat. It is said that a party of excursionists went up the river aboard of her and got stranded; then there was a sad and solemn procession walked down the banks of the placid Walnut, towing the boat. It resembled a Quaker funeral.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, June 26, 1886. From Friday's Daily.

A party was organized at Wichita the first of the week to sail down the Arkansas River to Arkansas City, headed by Rev. Parker, pastor of the Congregational Church. Bright and early Monday morning the party set sail on a flat-boat down the river. All went along smoothly until they arrived opposite a farm house. It was about eating time and the party thought it would be a grand opportunity to go ashore and obtain some fresh milk at the farm house and eat dinner. In attempting to land the covering of the boat caught in the branches of some trees on the bank, causing it to tilt to one side. Before the canvass could be released from its fastening, the boat capsized and the entire party with all their "chattels" were precipitated into the "ragin' Rackensack." Fortunately, the river was shallow and all waded ashore, getting nothing but a severe wetting, and losing about $100 worth of wraps, clothing, etc. The party, with their enthusiasm considerably dampened, wended their way to the farm house, the sight of which had been the cause of the mishap. From the farm house they went to the nearest railroad station and came in a roundabout way to Arkansas City, arriving yesterday on the noon train. The party was bound to visit the future metropolis of the Arkansas Valley in the face of all opposition.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, July 3, 1886. From Wednesday's Daily.

John Landes informs us that the steamer, "Kansas Millers," with her barges has arrived at Ft. Smith. They arrived there Monday, having made the trip in safety. At Ponca Agency a delay of three or four days was caused by the engineer getting sick. The boat did not stick upon any sandbars.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, July 10, 1886. From Wednesday's Daily.

Capt. E. S. Bliss, of "The Kansas Millers," got in today by rail, and reports a jolly and successful trip down the "ragin' Arkansaw." He was 66 hours and 5 minutes making the trip with a crew of eight, and no trouble, with the exception of a little between Salt Fork and Pawnee. About one-half of the cargo of 100,000 pounds of flour was sold in the Territory. The captain says the river was about three feet above low water mark and says there is no doubt "The Kansas Millers" is a success. On account of pressing business, he left the boat at Ft. Smith and came back by rail. Mr. Bliss is highly pleased with the trip, and says it is better than going to the mountains. Courier.

[KANSAS MILLERS.]

Arkansas City Republican, August 7, 1886.

Capt. Thompson arrived in this city last evening from Ohio. He came to take charge of the "Kansas Millers," having been telegraphed for by the Navigation Company. After remaining in the city overnight, he left this morning for Ft. Smith, where he went to take charge of the steamer and bring it up the river to this city. He intends to be here in ample time to run an excursion Saturday, August 14. On the following week Capt. Thompson will start for Ft. Smith with another load of flour. He will endeavor to make two trips per month. The navigation of the Arkansas from this city down to Ft. Smith has now begun in earnest.

[KANSAS MILLERS.]

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, August 27, 1886. From Monday's Daily.

Capt. Thompson, of Ohio, has effected the purchase of a two-thirds interest in the "Kansas Millers." He will go down to Ft. Smith tomorrow and bring her up. Bliss & Wood have sold their one-third interest in the boat to parties at Ft. Smith.

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, September 1, 1886.

The vision before our people's minds is a thrifty commercial and industrial city of 30,000 or 40,000 inhabitants, a railroad center with work shops and other division buildings, and a river navigation employing a large line of boats. This vision they feel so confident of seeing speedily realized that they have their estimate of value on what is shortly to be, and show their faith by putting their money into property at rates commensurate with their expectations. The only risk they run is in carrying this business too far and getting prices so high that they cannot be maintained.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, September 18, 1886. From Wednesday's Daily.

Steamboat excursion on the Walnut River, for the benefit of getting the "Belle," of Winfield, here. Everybody buy tickets to help the boat to get here. Tickets on sale at the Post Office and J. L. Howard's.

[STEAMBOAT LOADED FOR FORT SMITH.]

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, October 9, 1886. From Thursday's Daily.

Recently a steamboat was loaded at Arkansas City with a cargo of wheat, corn, and other produce and shipped for Fort Smith. The trip was successfully made and proved a profitable one to the owners of the boat and cargo. We mention this to call attention to the great Arkansas as a channel of commerce, which it will be when opened properly for navigation. Little or more money has been appropriated for or expended upon the river in the way of opening it for navigation. When this is done by appropriations from the government commensurate with the importance of the stream and interests of the country, the growth and development of the commercial and agricultural interests will be proportionately exchanged.

Wichita Eagle.

 

1887
Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, January 15, 1887. From Wednesday's Daily.

In the spring a boating club is to be organized. The Walnut River from Harmon's Bridge down affords a most excellent place for rowing.

[ATHLETIC CLUB.]

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, February 26, 1887.

The Athletic Club.
Yesterday afternoon we were shown a plat of the Santa Fe addition, east of the city, and the proposed park and race track. It was drawn by E. B. Wingate and is a special effort and we can say it is a credit to his skill. It shows the addition laid off in lots and blocks, streets and alleys, each being colored up in good style. Adjacent on the northeast is the race course and park. The track is to be one mile; the inside space to be used as a base ball and pleasure grounds. A small steamer is to be put on the Walnut River; also row boats. A boat house will be built at the foot of 5th Avenue. Following the course of the river is a driveway about one mile in length.

If the intentions of the club is carried out, we are safe in saying Arkansas City will have the handsomest and best pleasure grounds in the state. Santa Fe addition will also become a popular, and splendid place to reside.

There will be a meeting tonight in the rooms of the Business Men's club to complete the organization and take the necessary preliminary steps to the successful carrying out of the enterprise.

The park is to be devoted to the building of agricultural fairs, etc.

Arkansas City Republican, Saturday, February 26, 1887. From Monday's Daily.

R. U. Hess has commenced the formation of an athletic club. The intention of the organization is to place pleasure yachts, row boats, etc., on the Walnut River. He hopes to have everything moving properly by early summer.

Thus does my coverage of the early newspapers stop. Our hopes of using steamboats came to nought! I did find one reference to events in 1872 in the following...

[ARTICLE IN 1920 REFERRING TO 1872.]
Skipping forward to papers covered in the 1920s...

Arkansas City Traveler, Thursday, June 16, 1921.

ARKANSAS CITY IN 1872
An Interesting Record of the Old Time City Government.
Capt. M. N. Sinnott, city clerk, has dug up a very interesting record of city affairs which dates back many years, at the beginning of the city administration of the now famous Arkansas City, Kansas, and which is being kept for future use in the matter of looking up affairs that may be needed for various purposes.

This notation appears on the record dated August 9, 1875.

"Petition congress to make appropriation to make the Arkansas river navigable. Town company to deed 150 lots to the A. C. Navigation Co. to aid in purchase of boat to cost not less than $2,000 to navigate the Arkansas river."

The following are miscellaneous items relative to river travel and activities on both the Walnut and Arkansas rivers, which I found in the Arkansas City Traveler in various issues...MAW.

 

1922

[MEASURING DEVICE PLACED ON WALNUT RIVER BRIDGE, WINFIELD.]

Arkansas City Traveler, Tuesday, January 3, 1922.

MYSTERY SOLVED
Explanation Made of Curious Machine on South Bridge.
That black box fastened to the west rail of the Walnut river bridge on South Main street is part of an apparatus for measuring and recording the rise and fall of water in the river, it was explained today by those who have it in charge. The box has caused a great deal of wonderment and questioning, but no one seemed to know about it. Today it was learned that William Mason, who lives south of the river, near the bridge, is looking after the apparatus.

Attached to the rail of the bridge adjacent to the black box is a horizontal timber upon which is fastened a measuring scale ten feet and one tenth in length. The scale is divided into feet and tenths of a foot. Between zero and three feet the scale is divided by markings, each of which represent two one-hundredths of a foot.

An opening in the bottom of the box, through which projects a short length of pipe, allows a weighted cord to be let down to the water. A permanent marker on this cord is applied to the scale and the reading taken and noted. Mr. Mason says this is done twice a day, morning and evening. The fluctuations in the height of the river are thus accurately recorded.

This apparatus was placed on the bridge several weeks ago by agents of the United States Geological Survey. Its purpose is to record the flow of the river. Similar apparatus has been placed on bridges throughout the country in order to get a dependable estimate on the amount of water available in any given region. Some day this will be valuable in making plans for the conservation of water, or for utilizing the rivers for water power.

Mr. Mason was asked to look after the apparatus because he lives nearby. He gets a small fee for doing it. The daily records are forwarded to the survey at the end of each week.

--Courier.

[NEW STEEL BARGE FOR ARKANSAS CITY SAND PLANT.]

Arkansas City Traveler, Monday, March 20, 1922. Front Page.

A new steel barge is being constructed by the Imperial Welding and Boiler company of this city for the Arkansas City sand plant. According to the plans and specifications, the barge is to be 66 feet long, 22 feet wide, and 6 feet and 6 inches in depth. It will hold two carloads of sand and is being built at a cost of $10,000. The barge was designed and is being built by the Imperial Welding and Boiler company under the personal supervision of George P. Covell, the company's manager. The work on the barge has been delayed for several days on account of the high water in the Arkansas river, but will be resumed shortly as the water is rapidly receding.

When completed the boat will weigh 33 tons and its weight capacity in sand will be 80 tons (two carloads) which will make the total weight 113 tons when the boat is loaded. There is no machinery being installed on this boat. This has been provided for, the Imperial company having already built a steel barge for boiler and engine, which will be used to tow the new barge. The sand company is figuring on a total output of 25 carloads of sand daily, and for this purpose is investing a total of $60,000. This will be the largest sand plant west of Kansas City.

The sand plant is being operated by the firm of Dunn & Ambrose, under the title of the Arkansas City Sand company. J. B. Ambrose is the secretary and treasurer and N. C. Dunn is the president. Mr. Dunn bought in about a year and a half ago. He is an old time sand man and is prominent in the sand business.

The sand in the Arkansas river here bears the official test of 92 percent pure, and is the best sand in the state with the exception of the product which is taken from the Kaw river at Kansas City, Kansas, which is 96 percent pure. The sand in the Missouri river near the mouth of the Kaw is not worth anything for building purposes, according to George P. Covell. The A. C. Sand company's plant is located on West Washington avenue. The sand used by the company is pumped from the bed of the Arkansas river into the barge and is again pumped from the barge into the railway cars for shipping.

It is one of the important industries of this city and is marketing its product over a wide territory.

Arkansas City Traveler, Tuesday, April 11, 1922.

Man Riding a Log
There was a weird story being related here this morning in regard to parties who saw a man riding on a large log down the center of the Walnut river here on Sunday afternoon. There seems to be no one who can be located at this time who really saw the man in this predicament but, nevertheless, the story was being told today. Those who are inclined to believe the story are wondering whether or not he gained the bank safely and how far he rode down stream on the log before being rescued, or was saved by his own hands.

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, April 12, 1922.

A FISHING ADVENTURE
Three Boys Brought in Yesterday, Fishless and Clothesless.
Three Arkansas City boys who went fishing yesterday just above the dam three miles northwest of town on the Arkansas river met with some wholly unexpected experiences which furnished excitement not usually incident to the life of a fisherman or expected by pleasure hunters on a fishing expedition, according to a report made by Arthur Hill this morning.

The participants in this fishing event were Bud Sospburg, W. B. Bethel, and R. W. Hide. They constructed a three-log raft which they were using, and on which they had most of their clothing, hats, and shoes. The breaking away of the canal at the point where they were located caused a rush of water; and as a result, they lost control of the raft. In order to save themselves, they caught onto the branches of a tree and pulled themselves out while the raft came on down the canal. They were left with but little wearing apparel, most of their clothes having come down with the raft. In this plight they were compelled to hike for town and presented a spectacular aspect, when they were later picked up by Arthur Hill in his automobile near the Chestnut Avenue bridge which spans the Arkansas river west of town, and delivered to their respective destinations in town, fishless, and nearly clothesless, but rich enough in adventure.

Arkansas City Traveler, Saturday, April 15, 1922.

J. B. Ambrose, of the Arkansas City Sand company, reports that his company is again doing business on the Arkansas river west of the city after an enforced vacation on account of the recent high water in that stream. Yesterday the company hands, with the machinery at the pumping station near the Madison avenue bridge, loaded and shipped out eight cars of sand.

The Arkansas river sand from this point is in great demand all over the country for building purposes and the local company expects to get its share of the business this spring and summer. The work of yesterday was the first done there for a week or more, on account of the high water and the recent wind storm.

Mr. Ambrose also tells a good joke on himself and the company, which was the result of conditions of the elements, and which might have been prevented, had the men of the company known just what turn the elements were going to take on a certain occasion.

The company had a large raft, or barge, located on the Walnut river, which was used in the pumping of gravel from that stream, and during the high water in that river, the barge was towed from the main part of the stream, where there was lots of back water, in order that it might not break loose and float down the raging stream. Now the boat is on dry land, as the water fell several feet in the night recently, and naturally the barge had to remain there, as it was anchored. Now, there is going to be a big job for someone in getting the heavy barge and the machinery which it contains back into the stream.

[MR. AND MRS. GUY ECROYD: WILL ROW DOWN THE ARKANSAS RIVER.]

Arkansas City Traveler, Monday, July 10, 1922.

Mr. and Mrs. Guy Ecroyd will leave the city next Sunday for a new and novel trip, while on a two weeks vacation from the Newman store. They have purchased a row boat and will go down the Arkansas river, until they get tired of rowing and camping, and will then ship the boat back to the city. They have no particular destination in view, but may go as far downstream as Fort Smith, Arkansas. They are fitting up the boat with a canvass top to keep off the hot sun and also will take along camping apparatus, as they intend to camp out along the stream at night, while en route.

Arkansas City Traveler, Thursday, July 20, 1922.

Guy Ecroyd, who with Mrs. Ecroyd, started down the Arkansas River in a row boat on Sunday morning, sends word to the Newman store that they had reached Kaw City on Monday afternoon and that there was plenty of water for the small row boat. Mr. and Mrs. Ecroyd will go down the river until they have had enough of that sort of outing, and will then ship the boat back to the city, and will return home on the train. They chose this novel method of spending a two weeks vacation.

Arkansas City Traveler, Friday, July 21, 1922.

Guy Ecroyd sends a post card message to the Traveler from Ralston, Oklahoma, under date of Wednesday, July 19, stating there is "plenty of water and going fine. Water fell the first two days and then came up again, about like it was on Sunday when we left the city. Camped the second night below Ponca City and last night on Turkey Island. Talk about eating, you should see us." Mr. and Mrs. Ecroyd started down the Arkansas in a row boat last Sunday morning, on a vacation trip.

Arkansas City Traveler, Monday, July 31, 1922.

"It sure was fine and I will try the same stunt another year, when I take my annual vacation," said Guy Ecroyd, of the Newman store this morning, who with Mrs. Ecroyd enjoyed the trip of two weeks down the Arkansas river in a boat. Guy returned Saturday and Mrs. Ecroyd stopped off at Tulsa, for a several days' visit with her sister.

Mr. and Mrs. Ecroyd left the city two weeks ago yesterday in a row boat, which they rented from Marvin Wells, of North Fourth street, and they started back on the train from Fort Smith, Ark. The boat was shipped back from that city. He stopped at Tulsa overnight and she remained there. They did not intend to get as far as Fort Smith in the limited time allotted for the trip, but rather took the advance report in regard to them going there as a joke. However, as the water was high all the time they were away, they made the trip to Fort Smith and had time to spare. In other words, they went downstream along with the high water, which was just beginning to recede here at the time they left Arkansas City. When they reached Muskogee, they were overtaken by a rise which was said there to be as much as ten feet, as other streams flowing into the Arkansas near there had caused another big flow in the river. On account of the high water and the swift current, there wasn't much rowing to do, but Guy shows the signs of the burning sun. They camped on the banks of the river each night and thoroughly enjoyed the outing. They made the trip to Fort Smith, which by the river route covers several hundred miles, in eleven days and 3 hours.

 

Cowley County Historical Society Museum